Dentist
39 years of experience

Accepting new patients
Connecticut Ave - K Street
Washington Hospital Center
1234 19th St NW
Ste 508
Washington, DC 20036
202-223-3391
Locations and availability (2)

Patient Reviews ?

Overall Rating:
1.0
  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
Total Ratings

4

Total Reviews

4

Ratings
4 stars
3 stars
2 stars
1 star
Ease of Appointment:
  • Currently 2.5 of 4 stars
Comfortable Office:
  • Currently 2.5 of 4 stars
Cleanliness:
  • Currently 3 of 4 stars
Advanced Technology:
  • Currently 2 of 4 stars
Caring Manner:
  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
Pain Minimized:
  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
Satisfaction:
  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
 |  A Headache  |  show details
by Calvin S. on May 1st, 2013

I have never been so ridiculed about money I'm owed. AFTER A YEAR THEY STILL OWED ME $540.00!!! This is ridiculous. Especially after we sat for hours on the phone listening to my insurance company explain clearly what I'm responsible for.

  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
 |  Anesthesia-free Follow-up With a Steel Pick in Wound Site  |  show details
Feb 17th, 2012

The surgery itself went OK. I received treatment for two dry sockets following removal of four wisdom teeth. The dry socket treatment, with Dr. Gitelman, was the most painful medical experience that I have had in my life. Dr. Merlo followed up after the initial dry socket treatment and his bedside manner was lacking in listening skills and patient respect. My first post-op visit was to receive treatment for dry sockets. I appreciated that I was able to visit the office quickly, the same morning that I called to report the pain of the dry sockets. I also understand that dry sockets are something that can happen, outside of the doctors control. However, treatment of the dry sockets, specifically the pushing of gauze into the wound sites with a sharp, steel pick with no anesthesia was the most intense pain I have ever experienced. I was shocked it took place and could not believe the amount of pain that I was in while sitting in the chair receiving treatment. I pushed the back of my head into the chair as tears welled up in my eyes, in shock and unable to speak. When I arrived in my own work office later, I told some of my coworkers that I felt as though I had just been tortured or received medieval dental care. One of my colleagues referred me to her relative who works in an oral surgery clinic. I consulted with this dental professional at length about what happened. She was of the opinion that anesthesia should have been used and encouraged me to keep in touch with her. She also encouraged me to ask if antibiotics might be used at the next follow up visit to reduce the risk of infection of the dry sockets.Dr. Merlo conducted my follow-up visit for removal of the gauze. Before he began looking at my mouth, I explained to him the level of pain that I experienced while the gauze was put in place. He assured me that removing it would not be painful. This turned out to be true. However, when I asked him whether antibiotics might reduce the risk of dry socket infection, he erupted with a comment to the effect that, People go online and think they understand something from what they read on the Internet but they dont get the right information. Dr. Merlo should not assume where patients are getting their information. In reality, my information came from an active, licensed dental professional. I would encourage him to listen to what patients actually have to say and to engage them in a dialogue so that patients can better understand their medical situation and how to best care for their health post-operation. I left the office that day hoping to heal quickly and to have no further need to visit or interact with the office. The dry sockets took over six months to completely heal for all discomfort to cease and after that extended period of discomfort I felt relieved that this experience was over.However, I later received an additional bill from the office. I asked them to waive it as a courtesy, considering the pain (due to no use of anesthesia) and difficulty they had caused me, and received no response from the doctor, which I had requested in a letter. All I received was a threat from the receptionist to call collections the next day, which was a week before the bill was even due - highly unprofessional. My dentist, told me that he would no longer refer to Dr. Gitelman. My dentist also consulted with other oral surgeons on the issue, and all of them said that anesthesia should have been used for treating of the dry sockets.I asked Dr. Gitelman to inform future patients of the potential for intense pain during the dry socket treatment and to offer them, or simply just provide them with, a topical drip of anesthesia into the wound site or an injection of anesthesia before using a sharp, steel pick to insert gauze into dry sockets. He did not respond at all.I paid my outstanding bill with the office, but hope that others will not put money into this man's pockets, who doesn't seem to care or respect his patients, or respect the opinions of other dental professionals who suggest anesthesia for painful follow-up treatments.

  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
 |  Anesthesia-free Follow-up With a Steel Pick in Wound Site  |  show details
Feb 17th, 2012

The surgery itself went OK. I received treatment for two dry sockets following removal of four wisdom teeth. The dry socket treatment, with Dr. Gitelman, was the most painful medical experience that I have had in my life. Dr. Merlo followed up after the initial dry socket treatment and his bedside manner was lacking in listening skills and patient respect. My first post-op visit was to receive treatment for dry sockets. I appreciated that I was able to visit the office quickly, the same morning that I called to report the pain of the dry sockets. I also understand that dry sockets are something that can happen, outside of the doctors control. However, treatment of the dry sockets, specifically the pushing of gauze into the wound sites with a sharp, steel pick with no anesthesia was the most intense pain I have ever experienced. I was shocked it took place and could not believe the amount of pain that I was in while sitting in the chair receiving treatment. I pushed the back of my head into the chair as tears welled up in my eyes, in shock and unable to speak. When I arrived in my own work office later, I told some of my coworkers that I felt as though I had just been tortured or received medieval dental care. One of my colleagues referred me to her relative who works in an oral surgery clinic. I consulted with this dental professional at length about what happened. She was of the opinion that anesthesia should have been used and encouraged me to keep in touch with her. She also encouraged me to ask if antibiotics might be used at the next follow up visit to reduce the risk of infection of the dry sockets.Dr. Merlo conducted my follow-up visit for removal of the gauze. Before he began looking at my mouth, I explained to him the level of pain that I experienced while the gauze was put in place. He assured me that removing it would not be painful. This turned out to be true. However, when I asked him whether antibiotics might reduce the risk of dry socket infection, he erupted with a comment to the effect that, People go online and think they understand something from what they read on the Internet but they dont get the right information. Dr. Merlo should not assume where patients are getting their information. In reality, my information came from an active, licensed dental professional. I would encourage him to listen to what patients actually have to say and to engage them in a dialogue so that patients can better understand their medical situation and how to best care for their health post-operation. I left the office that day hoping to heal quickly and to have no further need to visit or interact with the office. The dry sockets took over six months to completely heal for all discomfort to cease and after that extended period of discomfort I felt relieved that this experience was over.However, I later received an additional bill from the office. I asked them to waive it as a courtesy, considering the pain (due to no use of anesthesia) and difficulty they had caused me, and received no response from the doctor, which I had requested in a letter. All I received was a threat from the receptionist to call collections the next day, which was a week before the bill was even due - highly unprofessional. My dentist, told me that he would no longer refer to Dr. Gitelman. My dentist also consulted with other oral surgeons on the issue, and all of them said that anesthesia should have been used for treating of the dry sockets.I asked Dr. Gitelman to inform future patients of the potential for intense pain during the dry socket treatment and to offer them, or simply just provide them with, a topical drip of anesthesia into the wound site or an injection of anesthesia before using a sharp, steel pick to insert gauze into dry sockets. He did not respond at all.I paid my outstanding bill with the office, but hope that others will not put money into this man's pockets, who doesn't seem to care or respect his patients, or respect the opinions of other dental professionals who suggest anesthesia for painful follow-up treatments.

  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
 |  Anesthesia-free Follow-up With a Steel Pick in Wound Site  |  show details
Feb 17th, 2012

The surgery itself went OK. I received treatment for two dry sockets following removal of four wisdom teeth. The dry socket treatment, with Dr. Gitelman, was the most painful medical experience that I have had in my life. Dr. Merlo followed up after the initial dry socket treatment and his bedside manner was lacking in listening skills and patient respect. My first post-op visit was to receive treatment for dry sockets. I appreciated that I was able to visit the office quickly, the same morning that I called to report the pain of the dry sockets. I also understand that dry sockets are something that can happen, outside of the doctors control. However, treatment of the dry sockets, specifically the pushing of gauze into the wound sites with a sharp, steel pick with no anesthesia was the most intense pain I have ever experienced. I was shocked it took place and could not believe the amount of pain that I was in while sitting in the chair receiving treatment. I pushed the back of my head into the chair as tears welled up in my eyes, in shock and unable to speak. When I arrived in my own work office later, I told some of my coworkers that I felt as though I had just been tortured or received medieval dental care. One of my colleagues referred me to her relative who works in an oral surgery clinic. I consulted with this dental professional at length about what happened. She was of the opinion that anesthesia should have been used and encouraged me to keep in touch with her. She also encouraged me to ask if antibiotics might be used at the next follow up visit to reduce the risk of infection of the dry sockets.Dr. Merlo conducted my follow-up visit for removal of the gauze. Before he began looking at my mouth, I explained to him the level of pain that I experienced while the gauze was put in place. He assured me that removing it would not be painful. This turned out to be true. However, when I asked him whether antibiotics might reduce the risk of dry socket infection, he erupted with a comment to the effect that, People go online and think they understand something from what they read on the Internet but they dont get the right information. Dr. Merlo should not assume where patients are getting their information. In reality, my information came from an active, licensed dental professional. I would encourage him to listen to what patients actually have to say and to engage them in a dialogue so that patients can better understand their medical situation and how to best care for their health post-operation. I left the office that day hoping to heal quickly and to have no further need to visit or interact with the office. The dry sockets took over six months to completely heal for all discomfort to cease and after that extended period of discomfort I felt relieved that this experience was over.However, I later received an additional bill from the office. I asked them to waive it as a courtesy, considering the pain (due to no use of anesthesia) and difficulty they had caused me, and received no response from the doctor, which I had requested in a letter. All I received was a threat from the receptionist to call collections the next day, which was a week before the bill was even due - highly unprofessional. My dentist, told me that he would no longer refer to Dr. Gitelman. My dentist also consulted with other oral surgeons on the issue, and all of them said that anesthesia should have been used for treating of the dry sockets.I asked Dr. Gitelman to inform future patients of the potential for intense pain during the dry socket treatment and to offer them, or simply just provide them with, a topical drip of anesthesia into the wound site or an injection of anesthesia before using a sharp, steel pick to insert gauze into dry sockets. He did not respond at all.I paid my outstanding bill with the office, but hope that others will not put money into this man's pockets, who doesn't seem to care or respect his patients, or respect the opinions of other dental professionals who suggest anesthesia for painful follow-up treatments.