Pediatric / Adolescent Psychiatrist, Psychiatrists
23 years of experience

Accepting new patients
Washington Ave - Memorial Park
550 Westcott St
Ste 520
Houston, TX 77007
713-864-6696
Locations and availability (2)

Education ?

Medical School Score
The University of Texas at Houston (1987)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology

Publications & Research

Dr. Mao has contributed to 6 publications.
Title Dexmethylphenidate Extended-release Capsules in Children with Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder.
Date April 2008
Journal Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Excerpt

OBJECTIVE: This study compared once-daily dexmethylphenidate extended release (D-MPH-ER) 20 mg/day and placebo over 12 hours in children ages 6 to 12 with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in a laboratory classroom setting. METHOD: All of the children were stabilized for > or =2 weeks on a total dose (nearest equivalent) MPH 40 mg/day or immediate-release D-MPH 20 mg/day before screening. After a practice day, they received 6 days of D-MPH-ER 20 mg/day or placebo at home, returning on day 7 for one dose. Subjects were evaluated at predose and postdose hours 0.5, 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 9, 10, 11, and 12 and then crossed over to the other treatment arm using the identical protocol. The primary efficacy variable was the change from predose in Swanson, Kotkin, Agler, M-Flynn, and Pelham rating scale (SKAMP) combined score from 1 to 12 hours. Secondary efficacy variables included SKAMP combined score at 0.5 hours, SKAMP subscale scores, and math test results over 12 hours. RESULTS: Sixty-eight children were randomized, with 67 completing the study. Onset of action was indicated by a significant difference between D-MPH-ER and placebo at 0.5 hour on the SKAMP combined score (p = .001). For efficacy measures, differences from placebo were significant at all points between 0.5 and 12 hours (p < .001 top = .013). CONCLUSIONS: D-MPH-ER provided sustained improvement in attention, deportment, and academic productivity throughout the 12-hour laboratory day.

Title Growing Evidence to Support Early Intervention in Early Onset Bipolar Disorder.
Date October 2007
Journal The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Title Premigratory Expectations and Mental Health Symptomatology in a Group of Vietnamese Amerasian Youth.
Date April 1993
Journal Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Excerpt

This paper reports on the first phase of a prospective longitudinal evaluation of the relationship between premigratory expectations for life in the United States and postmigratory symptoms of anxiety and depression in a group of Vietnamese Amerasian youth. Premigratory expectations, as measured by an expectations questionnaire, are correlated with concurrent symptomatology assessed utilizing the General Health Questionnaire, Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25, and Vietnamese Depression Scale. Those with higher premigratory expectations tended to report fewer symptoms of anxiety and depression. Implications of these findings for future research defining the relationship between premigratory expectations and postmigratory symptoms are discussed.

Title Premigratory Risk Factors in Vietnamese Amerasians.
Date March 1993
Journal The American Journal of Psychiatry
Excerpt

OBJECTIVE: The study's goal was to determine the ability of risk factors determined before migration to predict future levels of anxiety and depression in a group of Vietnamese Amerasian immigrants. METHOD: In a cohort of 161 randomly selected Vietnamese Amerasian youth in Vietnam awaiting placement, risk factors for psychological distress were identified with Felsman's 35-item Personal Information Form and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25 (HSCL-25). Ninety-five members of the original cohort were subsequently reevaluated, again with the HSCL-25, at a Philippine refugee center during their 6-month stay there awaiting placement in the United States. RESULTS: A statistically significant relationship was found between greater numbers of risk factors identified in Vietnam and higher total symptom levels in the Philippines. The strongest relationship was between greater numbers of risk factors and higher levels of depression. The relationship between number of risk factors and levels of anxiety was not significant. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the ability of risk factors determined prior to departure in Vietnam to predict future levels of psychological distress in a group of Vietnamese Amerasian immigrants.

Title A Risk Profile Predicting Psychological Distress in Vietnamese Amerasian Youth.
Date November 1992
Journal Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Excerpt

The relationship between risk factors and psychological distress was examined in 161 Vietnamese Amerasian youth. Background factors such as a history of missing school, frequent hospitalizations, and previous refugee camp experience distinguished those with higher levels of anxiety and depression. This study provides support for attempts to link specific risk factors with increased levels of psychological distress in immigrant populations. Confirmation of the predictive power of these risk factors awaits completion of a longitudinal study following the Ameriasians as they resettle in the United States.

Title Onset of Efficacy of Long-acting Psychostimulants in Pediatric Attention-deficit/hyperactivity Disorder.
Date
Journal Postgraduate Medicine
Excerpt

Background: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) adversely impacts the educational achievement, mood and emotion processing, and interpersonal relationships of children and adolescents. Effective treatments include a number extended-release (ER) methylphenidate-(MPH) and amphetamine-based drugs. Some formulations release a comparatively larger bolus after dosing and can result in different onset and duration of efficacy. Objective: Provide an evidence-based description of the time course of efficacy of psychostimulant medications used in ADHD treatment of children and adolescents. Data Sources: A literature search from 1998 to 2008 was conducted using a MEDLINE database and the keywords "attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder," "extended-release," "sustained-release," "methylphenidate," "amphetamine," "randomized," "controlled," "placebo," "efficacy," "time course," and "classroom study." Data Extraction: Selection criteria included randomized, blinded, placebo- or active comparator-controlled clinical studies that evaluated an ER formulation of a psychostimulant treatment for ADHD in at least 30 children and adolescents aged 6 to 17 years. Study Selection: Eighteen clinical trials met the chosen criteria and evaluated: d, l-MPH, long-acting (d, l-MPH-LA); d, l-MPH-OR; d, l-MPH-CD (MCD); d-MPH-ER; MPH transdermal system (MTS); mixed amphetamine salts, ER (MAS-XR); and lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX). Data Synthesis: Onset of efficacy was earliest for d-MPH-ER at 0.5 hours, followed by d, l-MPH-LA at 1 to 2 hours, MCD at 1.5 hours, d, l-MPH-OR at 1 to 2 hours, MAS-XR at 1.5 to 2 hours, MTS at 2 hours, and LDX at approximately 2 hours. Duration of efficacy for each treatment was: MCD 7.5 hours; d, l-MPH-LA 8 to 12 hours; and 12 hours for MTS, d-MPH-ER, d, l-MPH-OR, MAS-XR, and LDX. However, data should be interpreted with caution given the different trial designs and assessment time points. Conclusions: d-MPH-ER has the earliest onset of efficacy at 0.5 hours postdose, and MTS, d-MPH-ER, d, l-MPH-OR, MAS-XR, and LDX have a long duration of action at 12 hours postdose. Clinicians should consider differences in the onset of efficacy of each drug in the context of individual patient needs.


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