Physiatrist, Pain Medicine, Sports Medicine
11 years of experience

Accepting new patients
Midtown East
820 2nd Ave
Suite 6D
New York, NY 10017
347-404-5122
Locations and availability (2)

Education ?

Medical School
St. George's University (1999)
Residency
University Of Washington Medical Ctr (2003) *
Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation
Fellowship
Beth Israel Medical Center *
* This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice 5th Anniversary Award (2012 - 2013)
Patients' Choice Award (2008 - 2013)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2011 - 2013)
Top 10 Doctor - State (2014)
New York
Physiatrist
Top 10 Doctor - City (2014)
New York, NY
Physiatrist
Appointments
Weill Medical College Of Cornell University (2004 - Present)
Cornell University School of Medicine
Assistant Professor of Rehabilitation Medicine
Associations
American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine
American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Affiliations ?

Dr. Panagos is affiliated with 4 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • NewYork-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell
    525 E 68th St, New York, NY 10065
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • New York Presbyterian Hospital
  • New York Presbyterian HospitalNew York Weill Cornell Center
  • Nyp-Weill Cornell
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Panagos has contributed to 13 publications.
    Title Musculoskeletal Performance and Hydration Status.
    Date June 2010
    Journal Current Reviews in Musculoskeletal Medicine
    Excerpt

    Maximal performance during competition is the drive many competitors use to train harder. However, there are several variables that contribute to impair a competitor's performance. These variables work by altering the homeostatic mechanisms within the body. Once homeostasis is altered the competitor's body is no longer optimized to face the stresses of the athletic competition. The environment works as an all encompassing variable that will affect sweat rate. During increased environmental heat strain, one must adjust for critical variables, such as temperature regulation, hydration status, and electrolyte levels, as they can contribute to impaired performance. Acclimatization through training and competition will reduce or slow down the effects of these stress factors. Ever evolving recommendations are produced to aid competitors in maintaining homeostasis. Despite all the generic recommendations that are made, however, every athlete needs to individualize their training and competition regimens to optimize personal performance.

    Title Industrial Medicine and Acute Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 2. Medications for the Treatment of Acute Musculoskeletal Pain.
    Date April 2007
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    This self-directed learning module highlights medications used in the treatment of acute musculoskeletal pain in the context of industrial rehabilitation. It is part of the study guide on industrial rehabilitation medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article compares various skeletal muscle relaxants, addresses issues related to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medications, provides an algorithm for acute pain management in an injured worker, and discusses topical medications for the treatment of pain. OVERALL ARTICLE OBJECTIVE: To summarize medication options in the treatment of acute musculoskeletal pain in the setting of injured workers.

    Title Industrial Medicine and Acute Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 3. Work-related Musculoskeletal Conditions: the Role for Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Bracing, and Modalities.
    Date April 2007
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    This chapter focuses on the use of modalities, therapeutic exercise, and orthotic devices in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, plantar fasciitis, neck pain and low back pain. It is part of the study guide on industrial rehabilitation medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. OVERALL ARTICLE OBJECTIVE: To review the medical literature that may help clinicians make treatment decisions regarding modalities, therapeutic exercise, and orthotic devices for treating common work-related conditions in the upper and lower limbs.

    Title Industrial Medicine and Acute Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 4. Interventional Procedures for Work-related Cervical Spine Conditions.
    Date April 2007
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    This self-directed learning module outlines the use of interventional techniques in the treatment of neck pain with and without referred pain into the arm. It is part of the supplement on industrial rehabilitation medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article specifically focuses on interventions used to diagnose or treat the conditions commonly seen in patients with neck pain or referred pain into the upper limb. Techniques reviewed include the use of botulinum toxin injections in the treatment of myofascial pain, cervical zygapophyseal joint injections and radiofrequency neuroablation in the treatment of posterior column disorders, and epidural steroid injections in the treatment of cervical radicular and referred upper-limb pain. OVERALL ARTICLE OBJECTIVE: To give an overview of the current state of the art regarding diagnostic and nonsurgical invasive treatment procedures for neck pain with and without referred upper-limb pain.

    Title Industrial Medicine and Acute Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 5. Interventional Procedures for Work-related Lumbar Spine Conditions.
    Date April 2007
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    This chapter emphasizes the importance of establishing a differential diagnosis for low back pain (LBP) with and without referred lower-limb pain and outlines potential interventional treatments appropriate for each diagnosis. It is part of the study guide on industrial rehabilitation and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. The article specifically focuses on the various interventions used to diagnose or treat those conditions commonly seen in patients with work-related LBP or referred pain in the lower limb. Current criterion treatments for lumbar disk pain, including surgical options, are reviewed. OVERALL ARTICLE OBJECTIVE: To give an overview of the current state of diagnosis and treatment options for low back pain with or without referred leg pain focusing on interventional procedures.

    Title Industrial Medicine and Acute Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 6. Upper- and Lower-limb Injections for Acute Musculoskeletal Injuries and Injured Workers.
    Date April 2007
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    This self-directed study module focuses on the use of corticosteroids and other injections in the treatment of lateral epicondylitis, de Quervain's tenosynovitis, carpal tunnel syndrome, Achilles' tendinitis, and plantar fasciitis. It is part of the study guide on industrial rehabilitation medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. OVERALL ARTICLE OBJECTIVE: To review the medical literature to help clinicians make treatment decisions regarding corticosteroid and other injections in the upper and lower limbs in injured workers.

    Title Industrial Medicine and Acute Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 1. Diagnostic Testing in Industrial and Acute Musculoskeletal Injuries.
    Date April 2007
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    This self-directed learning module reviews the history and physical examination of common acute musculoskeletal conditions that occur in the occupational setting. It is part of the industrial medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation study guide in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. This article presents case vignettes to review the diagnostic evaluation of heel pain, whiplash, repetitive strain injuries, and low back pain. OVERALL ARTICLE OBJECTIVE: To understand the important components of a history, physical examination, and concise diagnostic testing when evaluating acute industrial and musculoskeletal injuries.

    Title Industrial Medicine and Acute Musculoskeletal Rehabilitation. 7. Acute Industrial Musculoskeletal Injuries in the Aging Workforce.
    Date April 2007
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    This learning module highlights the unique challenges faced by physicians treating the aging workforce. It is part of the industrial medicine and acute musculoskeletal rehabilitation study guide in the Self-Directed Physiatric Education Program for practitioners and trainees in physical medicine and rehabilitation. Factors intrinsic and extrinsic to the patient that increase the risk of injury with aging are outlined. Low back injuries are the most common musculoskeletal complaint in the aging workforce. A conceptual framework for low back pain with aging, a differential diagnosis, and appropriate laboratory and radiographic investigations are also presented. Determination of causation in the setting of comorbid medical conditions and rehabilitation strategies are reviewed. OVERALL ARTICLE OBJECTIVE: To recognize diagnosis and treatment issues that are unique to the aging worker.

    Title Quadriparesis Following Cervical Epidural Steroid Injections.
    Date July 2006
    Journal The Spine Journal : Official Journal of the North American Spine Society
    Title Dengue in Grenada.
    Date December 2005
    Journal Revista Panamericana De Salud Pública = Pan American Journal of Public Health
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: Dengue fever is endemic in the country of Grenada and is grossly underreported as a source of morbidity. The goal of this study was to assess the status of dengue fever in a representative community in Grenada. METHODS: Surveys were conducted in the Mont Tout/Grand Anse Valley area in the parish of St. George's from March to June 1996. The objectives of the survey were to: (1) to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAP) of residents; (2) to determine the presence of larval and adult Aedes aegypti and their potential breeding sites; and (3) to identify the seroprevalence of specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) dengue antibodies in the local population. RESULTS: Out of the 102 respondents to the KAP survey, 100 of them (98%) reported never having had dengue fever. Of the 75 persons who agreed to have blood samples taken, 70 of them (93%) (95% confidence interval = 85.1%-97.8%) tested positive with the IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indicating past exposure. In terms of water storage, 98 of 102 respondents (96%) stored fresh water in containers. The vector survey found 57 of the 102 households (56%) had Ae. aegypti larvae in water containers on their property, and 94 of 102 dwellings (92%) had adult Ae. aegypti mosquitoes indoors. CONCLUSIONS: Although many people were familiar with dengue fever and mosquitoes, the 1996 survey found that their knowledge of the important relationships among mosquitoes, human behavior, and disease transmission was incomplete. Since 1996, continued education efforts have been made in the public school system and with national public health campaigns, yet little effort has been specifically targeted towards our study community. These data suggest Grenada has a need for continued community education that addresses dengue fever transmission and Ae. aegypti reduction.

    Title Treatment of Myofascial Shoulder Pain in the Spinal Cord Injured Population Using Static Magnetic Fields: a Case Series.
    Date August 2004
    Journal The Journal of Spinal Cord Medicine
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Magnetic therapy has been used in the treatment of a wide variety of chronic pain syndromes. It has not been studied in the treatment of myofascial shoulder pain in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI). Because this type of pain is commonly refractory to traditional therapy, alternative treatments often are considered. The primary objective is to determine whether myofascial shoulder pain in persons with SCI can be temporarily ameliorated with static magnetic fields. DESIGN: Case series. SETTING: Clinic of a university hospital system. PARTICIPANTS: A volunteer sample of 8 participants with SCI; 3 women, 5 men; mean age = 45 years; mean duration of injury = 12.3 years. INTERVENTIONS: Placement of a commercially available magnet with a static magnetic field of 500 gauss on the affected shoulder for 1 hour. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pretreatment and posttreatment scores on the short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire and pressure algometry were compared. RESULTS: The short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire descriptors demonstrated significant decreases: stabbing, 0.75 +/- 0.71 (P < 0.02); sharp, 0.50 +/- 0.53 (P < 0.033); and tender, 0.88 +/- 0.83 (P < 0.021). They also demonstrated a significant decrease in the present pain intensity of 0.63 +/- 0.52 (P < 0.011). Participants demonstrated a nonsignificant decrease of 0.813 +/- 0.998 (P < 0.55) on the visual analog scale. Pressure algometry was nonsignificant with a difference of 0.062 +/- 1.17 (P < 0.885). CONCLUSION: Static magnetic fields may decrease the sensory dimensions and intensity of myofascial shoulder pain in persons with SCI.

    Title Candida Albicans Cell Walls Contain the Fluorescent Cross-linking Amino Acid Dityrosine.
    Date October 1995
    Journal Infection and Immunity
    Excerpt

    Several clinical and laboratory isolates of Candida albicans have a natural blue surface fluorescence when cultured and observed with sensitive optics. The localization and color of the fluorescence are similar to those of the natural fluorescence of sporulated Saccharomyces cerevisiae which is caused by the generation and surface deposition of the cross-linking amino acid dityrosine. In S. cerevisiae, dityrosine production results from the direct action of at least two genes and is responsible for resistance of the ascospores to lytic enzymes and physicochemical trauma. Among the criteria for the identification of dityrosine is pH sensitivity of the fluorescence intensity and a highly characteristic shift of the fluorescence excitation maximum with a change in pH. Video microscopy of whole Candida organisms revealed the characteristic dityrosine intensity maximum at pH approximately 10 and the intensity minimum at pH approximately 2. Separation of an acid hydrolysate of Candida cell walls by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography revealed a fluorescence peak that coelutes with the reagent dityrosine. At pH approximately 10, this peak has a fluorescence excitation maximum of 320 to 325 nm, while at pH approximately 2, the excitation maximum is 285 to 290 nm. This excitation maximum shift and the observed emission maximum of approximately 410 nm are characteristic of dityrosine. Two separate strains of C. albicans were injected intraperitoneally into mice and harvested at 24 h. Blue surface fluorescence was observed, suggesting that dityrosine generation occurs in vivo as well as in vitro. This is the first report of the presence of dityrosine in a human fungal pathogen.

    Title Ventricular Fibrillation in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy is Associated with Increased Fractionation of Paced Right Ventricular Electrograms.
    Date September 1992
    Journal Circulation
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND. Intraventricular conduction in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) has been characterized to test the hypothesis that myofibrillar disarray will cause dispersion of activation throughout the ventricular myocardium. METHODS AND RESULTS. Of 37 patients with HCM, four had spontaneous ventricular fibrillation (VF), five had nonsustained ventricular tachycardia (VT), 13 had no risk factors, and 15 had a family history of sudden death. These patients and four controls were studied by pacing one site in the right ventricle and recording electrograms from three other right ventricular sites. These electrograms were high-pass filtered to emphasize small deflections due to activation of small bundles of myocytes close to the electrode. Intraventricular conduction curves were obtained with S1S2 coupling intervals decreasing in 1-msec steps from 479 msec to ventricular effective refractory period (VERP). These curves were repeated by pacing each RV site in turn and were characterized by two parameters: the point at which latency increased by 0.75 msec/20 msec reduction of the S1S2 coupling interval and an increase in electrogram duration between an S1S2 of 350 msec and VERP. Patients with VF, VT, and family history of sudden death had a mean increase in electrogram duration of 12.8 (2.9-32.3) msec versus 4.6 (-4.2 to 14.0) msec in low-risk patients and controls. Electrogram latency increased at an S1S2 of 363 msec in the VF group (342-386), 269 msec in the controls (266-279), and 326 msec in the non-VF group (260-399). Discriminant analysis separated VF patients from the remainder (p less than 0.0001) and VF, VT, and family history of sudden death patients from the low-risk and control groups (p less than 10(-6)). CONCLUSIONS. Patients with HCM who are at risk of sudden death have increased dispersion and inhomogeneity of intraventricular conduction, and this may create the conditions for reentry and arrhythmogenesis.


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