Internists, Geriatric Specialist (elderly care)
29 years of experience

Accepting new patients
University City
Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center
3900 Woodland Ave
Philadelphia, PA 19104
800-949-1001
Locations and availability (4)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
University of California at San Francisco (1981)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Internal Medicine

Affiliations ?

Dr. Kinosian is affiliated with 6 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Hospital of the University of PA
    3400 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • University of PA Medical Center/Presbyterian
    51 N 39th St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • University Of Pennsylvania Medical Center
  • Presbyterian Hospital
  • Presbyterian Medical Center
  • Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    3900 Woodland Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19104
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Kinosian has contributed to 16 publications.
    Title Pressure Ulcers in Elderly Patients with Hip Fracture Across the Continuum of Care.
    Date June 2009
    Journal Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    Excerpt

    To identify care settings associated with greater pressure ulcer risk in elderly patients with hip fracture in the postfracture period.

    Title Energy Absorption is Reduced with Oleic Acid Supplements in Human Short Bowel Syndrome.
    Date February 2009
    Journal Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
    Excerpt

    Oleic acid premeal supplements have been described as a method to trigger the ileal brake and thus lengthen transit time and the opportunity for nutrient absorption. The aims of this study were to determine whether oleic acid supplements would lengthen transit time and improve absorption of nutrients in study participants with short bowel syndrome as well as affect diarrhea or patient weight.

    Title Obesity Reduces the Risk of Pressure Ulcers in Elderly Hospitalized Patients.
    Date January 2008
    Journal The Journals of Gerontology. Series A, Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Both underweight and obesity have been suggested as risk factors for pressure ulcers (PU) development, although data are limited. Our aim was to evaluate the odds of PU in underweight and obese, relative to optimal weight patients. METHODS: Secondary data analysis of a prospective cohort study of risk factors for PU on admission or by hospital day 3 in 3214 elderly patients admitted during 1998-2001 to two hospitals in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. RESULTS: Patients who were underweight had greater odds of developing PU (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.8, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2-2.6). Patients who were obese had reduced odds (adjusted OR = 0.7, 95% CI, 0.4-1.0), and those with severe obesity had the lowest odds of PU (adjusted OR = 0.1, 95% CI, 0.01-0.6). CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest that extra body fat reduces the risk of PU in elderly hospitalized patients.

    Title Systemic Inflammatory Mediators and Bone Homeostasis in Intestinal Failure.
    Date May 2007
    Journal Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: A proinflammatory state has been described in patients with intestinal failure. The prevalence of metabolic bone disease in this group is considerable. It is not known whether this proinflammatory state is related to bone parameters, though bone disease is recognized as a proinflammatory process in postmenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to examine whether inflammation was related to bone disease. METHODS: Eight patients with parenteral nutrition (PN)-dependent intestinal failure but no recent infections or immunosuppressive medications had serum assayed for interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, and its receptors (TNFR-I and TNFR-II), C-reactive protein, and whole blood for lymphocyte proliferation. Routine clinical laboratory measures of vitamin D, parathyroid hormone, serum calcium, and phosphorus within 3 months of the inflammatory measures were compared by Pearson's correlation to the inflammatory measures. RESULTS: Mean values for calcium, phosphorus, and albumin were normal, but 25-hydroxy vitamin D was reduced and parathyroid hormone and alkaline phosphatase elevated. Serum total calcium was negatively related to TNFR-II, TNF-alpha and positively to T-helper cells. Longer PN dependence was associated with inflammation and negatively with T-helper cells. CONCLUSIONS: These preliminary findings are hypothesis generating only but support an association of low calcium and longer duration of PN with inflammation in patients with intestinal failure. Whether the inflammation results from vitamin D deficiency or the vitamin D deficiency develops secondary to excessive use of activated vitamin D to modulate inflammation from some other cause, such as a component of PN or repeated infectious challenge, requires further study.

    Title Intestinal Failure-associated Metabolic Bone Diseases and Response to Teriparatide.
    Date February 2007
    Journal Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
    Excerpt

    Patients requiring home parenteral nutrition (PN) may develop metabolic bone disease, the etiology of which can be multifactorial. We report a case of significantly low bone mass in a postmenopausal woman with history of short bowel syndrome, renal impairment, and previous radiation exposure who responded to intermittent subcutaneous administration of parathyroid hormone. Her bone mineral density normalized after she completed a course of 18 months of treatment, and a bone isotope scan was negative for skeletal malignancy.

    Title Perioperative Parenteral Nutrition: Impact on Morbidity and Mortality in Surgical Patients.
    Date January 2006
    Journal Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
    Title Comparison Between Medgem and Deltatrac Resting Metabolic Rate Measurements.
    Date December 2005
    Journal European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The primary aims of this trial were to evaluate the reproducibility of a portable handheld calorimeter (Medgem) in a clinical population, and to compare its measures with a calorimeter in typical use with these patients. DESIGN: Cross-sectional clinical validation study. SETTING: Outpatient Clinical Research Center. SUBJECTS: A total of 24 stable home nutrition support patients. INTERVENTIONS: In random order three measures of resting metabolic rate (RMR) were taken after a 4-h fast, 15 min rest and 2-h abstention from exercise. Two measures were taken with the same Medgem (MG) and one with the traditional calorimeter (Deltatrac). Reproducibility of MG measures and their comparability to a Deltatrac measure were assessed by Bland-Altman analysis, with >+/-250 kcal/day established a priori as a clinically unacceptable error. In addition, disagreement between the two types of measures was defined as greater than 10% difference. RESULTS: The mean difference between two MG measures was -6.8 kcal/day, with limits of agreement between 233 and -247 kcal/day and clinically acceptable. The mean difference between the Deltatrac and mean of two MG measures was -162 kcal/day, with limits of agreement between 577 and -253 kcal/day and clinically unacceptable. In all, 80% of the repeated MG RMR measures agreed within 10%, and the mean MG reading agreed with the Deltatrac in 60% of cases. CONCLUSIONS: RMR obtained using the MG calorimeter has an acceptable degree of reproducibility, and is acceptable to patients. The MG measures, however, are frequently lower than traditional measures and require further validation prior to application to practice in this vulnerable patient group.

    Title A Case of Cronkhite-canada Syndrome with Taste Disturbance As a Leading Complaint.
    Date December 2005
    Journal Digestion
    Excerpt

    Cronkhite-Canada syndrome was first described in 1955. The clinical features of this rare syndrome of unknown etiology include nonhereditary gastrointestinal polyposis together with diarrhea, nail dystrophy, alopecia, and hyperpigmentation of the skin. This syndrome has been divided into five clinical types based on initial symptoms. We describe a case of Cronkhite-Canada syndrome presenting with taste disturbance as the major symptom, present a comprehensive review of the literature concerning this rare syndrome, and suggest therapeutic treatment options.

    Title Choline and Vitamin B12 Deficiencies Are Interrelated in Folate-replete Long-term Total Parenteral Nutrition Patients.
    Date September 2002
    Journal Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Choline has recently been recognized as an essential nutrient, in part based on deficiency data in long-term home total parenteral nutrition (TPN) patients. Choline, a methyl donor in the metabolism of homocysteine, is intricately related to folate status, but little is known about choline and vitamin B12 status. Long-term TPN patients are also subject to vitamin B12 deficiency. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to evaluate any interaction between choline, vitamin B12, and folate in patients with severe malabsorption syndromes, requiring long-term TPN. DESIGN: Plasma free choline, serum and red blood cell (RBC) folate, serum vitamin B12 methylmalonic acid, B6, and plasma total homocysteine concentrations were assayed by standard methods. Low choline was defined as values that fall 1 to < or =3 and marked low choline concentration as >3 SD below the control mean. RESULTS: Both low choline concentrations (52% were marked low, 33% low, 14% normal) and elevated methylmalonic acid concentrations (47%) were prevalent. Choline concentration was significantly lower and RBC folate higher in patients with elevated methylmalonic acid. Total homocysteine elevations were rare (3 of 21) and mild. CONCLUSIONS: These data suggest a strong interaction between vitamin B12 and choline deficiencies and folate status in this population, which may be due in part to variations in vitamin and choline delivery by TPN. Folate adequacy may increase B12 use for homocysteine metabolism, thus limiting B12 availability for methylmaIonic acid metabolism. Choline use may also increase, and choline deficiency may worsen if choline substitutes when the vitamin B12 side of the homocysteine metabolic pathway cannot be used.

    Title Hyperhomocysteinemia is Associated with Venous Thrombosis in Patients with Short Bowel Syndrome.
    Date June 2001
    Journal Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocysteinemia is associated with venous thrombosis and vitamin deficiency. Patients with short bowel syndrome have increased risk of venous thrombosis due to central catheters, and of vitamin deficiency due to malabsorption. The current investigation was designed to evaluate the relationship between history of venous thrombosis and current hyperhomocystinemia and vitamin deficiency in patients with short bowel syndrome. METHODS: Plasma total homocysteine (tHcy), serum vitamin B12, folate, B6, and methylmalonic acid (MMA) were measured. Venous thrombosis was documented by venogram or ultrasound. RESULTS: Ten of 17 patients had venous thromboses, including 17 of 38 observed superior and 12 of 26 inferior veins. Total homocysteine was correlated with number of thromboses. The relative risk of multiple thromboses in the highest tHcy tertile was 3.6-fold that of the lowest tertile. Vitamin B12 and folate levels were within normal limits, but B12 deficiency by MMA or tHcy level was apparent in 7 patients. Vitamin-deficient patients had higher tHcy and MMA than those without deficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Venous thrombosis in patients with short bowel syndrome is related to hyperhomocystinemia, which is also related to vitamin B12 deficiency, not detected by serum vitamin B12 concentration. Whether treatment of vitamin deficiencies and associated reduction in tHcy will reduce recurrent venous thrombosis in these patients is not known.

    Title Predicting 10-year Care Requirements for Older People with Suspected Alzheimer's Disease.
    Date June 2000
    Journal Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the types and costs of care received for 10 years after the identification of an older person with suspected Alzheimer's disease (AD) by using data from 3254 patients with suspected AD who participated in the National Long Term Care Survey (NLTCS). METHODS: By using a Markov model derived using grade of membership techniques, the following were determined: survival probabilities at 10 years; years of survival during the 10 years; years in institutions; years with two or more impairments in basic activities of daily living; hours of paid and informal care while the older person lived in the community; and costs of paid community, institutional, and medical care. RESULTS: Greater degrees of cognitive impairment present when AD was identified were associated with reduced predicted probability of surviving 10 years, increased predicted number of years spent in institutions, increased hours of care required while affected individuals remained in the community, and increased costs of paid community, institutional, and medical care. Substantial differences between men and women were seen: severity-adjusted 10-year costs were almost two times higher for women with AD than for men ($75,000 compared with $44,000); according to sensitivity analysis, average 10-year costs might be as high as $109,000 for women and $67,000 for men. CONCLUSIONS: AD imposes a substantial burden on older persons. Interventions that slow the progression of the disease may therefore affect community survival as well as healthcare costs.

    Title Wheat Bran Decreases Aberrant Crypt Foci, Preserves Normal Proliferation, and Increases Intraluminal Butyrate Levels in Experimental Colon Cancer.
    Date October 1999
    Journal Jpen. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Dietary wheat bran protects against colon cancer, but the mechanism(s) of this effect is not known. Butyrate, produced by colonic bacterial fermentation of dietary polysaccharides, such as wheat bran, induces apoptosis and decreases proliferation in colon cancer cell lines. Whether similar effects occur in vivo is not well defined. We hypothesized that wheat bran's antineoplastic effects in vivo may be mediated in part by butyrate's modulation of apoptosis and proliferation. METHODS: Male F344 rats were fed wheat bran-supplemented or an isocaloric, isonitrogenous fiber-free diet. Rats were treated with one dose of the carcinogen azoxymethane or vehicle with sacrifice after 5 days (tumor initiation); or two doses (days O and 7) with sacrifice after 56 days (tumor promotion). Study variables included fecal butyrate levels and the intermediate biomarkers of colon carcinogenesis, aberrant crypt foci (ACF), and changes in crypt cell proliferation and apoptosis. RESULTS: During tumor initiation, wheat bran produced greater apoptosis (p = .01), a trend toward less proliferation, and preserved the normal zone of proliferation (p = .01). At tumor promotion, wheat bran decreased the number of ACF (proximal colon, p = .005; distal colon, p = .047) and maintained the normal proliferative zone. The fiber-free diet shifted the zone of proliferation into the premalignant pattern in both studies. Wheat bran produced significantly higher fecal butyrate (p = .01; .004, .00001) levels than the fiber-free diet throughout the tumor promotion study. CONCLUSIONS: Wheat bran increased apoptosis and controlled proliferation during tumor initiation and resulted in decreased ACF. Wheat bran's antineoplastic effects occurred early after carcinogen exposure, and were associated with increased fecal butyrate levels.

    Title Revised Estimates of Diagnostic Test Sensitivity and Specificity in Suspected Biliary Tract Disease.
    Date December 1994
    Journal Archives of Internal Medicine
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to estimate the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests for gallstones and acute cholecystitis. METHODS: All English-language articles published from 1966 through 1992 about tests used in the diagnosis of biliary tract disease were identified through MEDLINE. From 1614 titles, 666 abstracts were examined and 322 articles were read to identify 61 articles with information about sensitivity and specificity. Application of exclusion criteria based on clinical and methodologic criteria left 30 articles for analysis. Cluster-sampling methods were adapted to obtain combined estimates of sensitivities and specificities. Adjustments were made to estimates that were biased because the gold standard was applied preferentially to patients with positive test results. RESULTS: Ultrasound has the best unadjusted sensitivity (0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.95 to 0.99) and specificity (0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.88 to 1.00) for evaluating patients with suspected gallstones. Adjusted values are 0.84 (0.76 to 0.92) and 0.99 (0.97 to 1.00), respectively. Adjusted and unadjusted results for oral cholecystogram were lower. Radionuclide scanning has the best sensitivity (0.97; 95% confidence interval, 0.96 to 0.98) and specificity (0.90; 95% confidence interval, 0.86 to 0.95) for evaluating patients with suspected acute cholecystitis; test performance is unaffected by delayed imaging. Unadjusted sensitivity and specificity of ultrasound in evaluating patients with suspected acute cholecystitis are 0.94 (0.92 to 0.96) and 0.78 (0.61 to 0.96); adjusted values are 0.88 (0.74 to 1.00) and 0.80 (0.62 to 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound is superior to oral cholecystogram for diagnosing cholelithiasis, and radionuclide scanning is the test of choice for acute cholecystitis. However, sensitivities and specificities are somewhat lower than commonly reported. We recommend estimates that are midway between the adjusted and unadjusted values.

    Title Strategies for Screening Blood for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Antibody. Use of a Decision Support System.
    Date October 1990
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Excerpt

    A decision analytic model was used to examine alternative strategies to screen donated blood for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) using data from the literature and from 1987 blood-screening programs in areas with high and low prevalence of HIV. Sensitivity analyses incorporated uncertainties about HIV infection and test performance. Current screening strategies are estimated to allow 20.5 infected units per million donated units to be transfused at a cost of $16,850 per HIV-positive unit detected in high-prevalence areas and 4.7 infected units per million donated units to be transfused at a cost of $32,275 per HIV-positive unit detected in low prevalence areas, with nine false-positive notifications of uninfected patients per million units screened and 14.9 discarded, noninfected units per HIV-positive unit in low-prevalence areas. Testing donated blood for HIV can be improved by individualizing screening strategies for areas with different prevalences of HIV. Efforts to further reduce transfusion-associated HIV should focus on improved test performance in early stages of infection, reduction of unnecessary transfusions, donor recruitment in lower-risk groups, and public health measures to reduce HIV infection among the general population.

    Title Human Immunodeficiency Virus Test Evaluation, Performance, and Use. Proposals to Make Good Tests Better.
    Date May 1988
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Excerpt

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) tests are essential for detecting asymptomatic infection and are helpful in confirming the diagnoses of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-related complex and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Nonetheless, many aspects of their use remain controversial, partly because of concerns about test accuracy. This article reviews the scientific basis for the evaluation, performance, and use of the most commonly employed HIV assays. Current test performance could be improved by better standardization of test procedures and institution of mandatory proficiency testing and licensure of clinical laboratories that perform HIV testing. Test utility could be enhanced by sequencing tests more appropriately and by interpreting test results in conjunction with the clinical purpose for which the test is being used and the characteristics of the population under study. Finally, HIV tests should be evaluated in a manner that minimizes spectrum and referral bias and inadequate reference standard confirmation, problems that have affected the evaluation of current tests.

    Title Cutting into Cholesterol. Cost-effective Alternatives for Treating Hypercholesterolemia.
    Date May 1988
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Excerpt

    We performed an analysis of the cost-effectiveness of treating individuals with significantly elevated levels of total serum cholesterol (greater than 6.85 mmol/L [greater than 265 mg/dL], comparing treatment with three alternative agents: cholestyramine resin, colestipol, and oat bran (a soluble fiber). We simulated a program for lowering cholesterol levels that was similar to that of the Coronary Primary Prevention Trial, and then used the outcomes of the trial to calculate the incremental cost per year of life saved (YOLS) from the perspective of society. Our findings suggest that the cost per YOLS ranges from $117,400 (cholestyramine resin packets) to $70,900 (colestipol packets) and $17,800 (oat bran). Using bulk drug reduces the cost per YOLS to $65,100 (cholestyramine resin) and $63,900 (colestipol). Targeting bulk colestipol treatment only to smokers has a cost per YOLS of $47,010; the incremental cost of treating nonsmokers would be $89,600 per additional YOLS. Although pharmacologic therapy has substantial costs, it may be more cost-effective when low-cost forms are applied to particular high-risk groups, such as smokers. However, a broad public health approach to lowered cholesterol levels by additional dietary modification, such as with soluble fiber, may be preferred to a medically oriented campaign that focuses on drug therapy.


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