Orthopedic Surgeons, Surgical Specialist
12 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Center City East
Rothman Institute Jefferson
925 Chestnut St
Fl 5
Philadelphia, PA 19107
800-321-9999
Locations and availability (12)

Education ?

Medical School Score
UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson (1998)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Appointments
Thomas Jefferson Medical School
Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery
Associations
American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery
American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons

Affiliations ?

Dr. Getz is affiliated with 21 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Bryn Mawr Rehabilitation Hospital
    414 Paoli Pike, Malvern, PA 19355
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Nazareth Hospital
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    2601 Holme Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19152
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Mercy Suburban Hospital
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    2701 Dekalb Pike, Norristown, PA 19401
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Riddle Memorial Hospital
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    1068 W Baltimore Pike, Media, PA 19063
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Main Line Hospital - Bryn Mawr
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    130 S Bryn Mawr Ave, Bryn Mawr, PA 19010
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Pennsylvania Hospital University PA Health System
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    800 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • University of PA Medical Center/Presbyterian
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    51 N 39th St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    111 S 11th St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Hospital of the University of PA
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    3400 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Methodist Hospital
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    2301 S Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19148
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    1400 Lansdowne Ave, Darby, PA 19023
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Bucks County Specialty Hospital
  • Thomas Jefferson University Hospitals, Inc-Methodist Hospital Div
  • Methodist Hospital Division of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
  • Pennsylvania Hospital
  • Presbyterian Medical Center
  • University Of Pennsylvania Medical Center
  • Presbyterian Medical Center Of The University Of Pennsylvania Health System
  • Presbyterian Hospital
  • Riddle Hospital
  • Riddle Hospital - On staff since
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Getz has contributed to 6 publications.
    Title The Recurrent Unstable Elbow: Diagnosis and Treatment.
    Date August 2010
    Journal The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
    Title What's New in Shoulder and Elbow Surgery.
    Date March 2008
    Journal The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
    Title Neer Award 2005: Peripheral Nerve Function During Shoulder Arthroplasty Using Intraoperative Nerve Monitoring.
    Date June 2007
    Journal Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery / American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons ... [et Al.]
    Excerpt

    The incidence of neurologic injury after shoulder arthroplasty has been reported to be 1% to 4%. However, the true incidence may be higher, because injury is identified only clinically and examination of the post-arthroplasty shoulder is difficult. This study used intraoperative nerve monitoring to identify the incidence, pattern, and predisposing factors for nerve injury during shoulder arthroplasty. Continuous intraoperative monitoring of the brachial plexus was performed in 30 consecutive patients undergoing shoulder arthroplasty. Impending intraoperative compromise of nerve function was signaled by sustained neurotonic electromyographic activity or greater than 50% amplitude attenuation of transcranial electrical motor evoked potentials (or both). Arm and retractor positions were recorded and adjusted to relieve tension. Patients with intraoperative nerve alerts underwent diagnostic electromyography at least 4 weeks postoperatively. Of the patients, 17 (56.7%) had 30 episodes of nerve dysfunction (ie, nerve alerts) during surgery. None of these 30 nerve alerts returned to baseline with retractor removal alone. Of the 30 alerts, 23 (76.7%) returned to baseline after repositioning of the arm into a neutral position. Postoperative electromyography results were positive in 4 of 7 patients (57.1%) who did not have a return to baseline transcranial electrical MEPs intraoperatively and in 1 of 10 (10%) whose nerve function did return to baseline. In all cases of positive postoperative electromyographic results, the pattern of nerve involvement matched the pattern of intraoperative nerve dysfunction. The affected nerves included the following: combined (ie, mixed plexopathy) (46.7%), musculocutaneous (20%), axillary (16.7%), ulnar (10%), and radial (6.7%). Prior shoulder surgery and passive external rotation of less than 10 degrees were associated with an increased incidence of nerve dysfunction (P < .05). The incidence of nerve injury during shoulder arthroplasty is likely greater than reported. Positioning of the arm at the extremes of motion should be minimized. Patients with decreased motion (<10 degrees passive external rotation with the arm at the side) and a history of prior open shoulder surgery are at higher risk for nerve injury and should be counseled on the increased risk. This patient population may also be considered for routine nerve monitoring.

    Title Treatment of Glenohumeral Subluxation Using Electrothermal Capsulorrhaphy.
    Date March 2006
    Journal Arthroscopy : the Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery : Official Publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to review the results of a relatively homogenous group of patients with glenohumeral subluxation without labral pathology who were treated with an electrothermal capsulorrhaphy procedure. TYPE OF STUDY: Case series without controls. METHODS: From 1997 to 1998, 42 patients underwent electrothermal capsulorrhaphy using a monopolar radiofrequency probe (Oratec Interventions, Menlo Park, CA). Patients with prior capsular repairs, labral pathology that required repair, or capsular avulsion injuries were excluded from the study. Thirty-one patients met the inclusion criteria. Patients had a minimum of 2 years of follow-up (mean, 25 months), and a mean age of 25 years (range, 16 to 38 years). All of the patients had previously failed conservative treatment. There were 25 patients with unidirectional anterior instability, 2 patients with unidirectional inferior instability, 1 patient with unidirectional posterior instability, and 3 patients with multidirectional instability. The patients were assessed using a modified American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons (ASES) score that examined pain (30 points), function (60 points), and patient satisfaction (10 points). In addition, subjective stability was assessed using a 10-point scale. RESULTS: The average modified ASES score increased to 88 points from 56 preoperatively (P < .01). The average subjective stability scale increased to 8.5 from 4.4 preoperatively (P < .01). Nineteen patients (61%) had an excellent result, 4 (13%) had a good result, 5 (16%) had a fair result, and 3 (10%) had a poor result; 22 of 26 patients who participated in sports were able to return to their preinjury level of play. The subset of patients with isolated anterior instability had results similar to the overall group. There were no instances of axillary neuritis or other neurologic injury. CONCLUSIONS: In carefully selected patients with shoulder instability, including unidirectional anterior instability without associated labral pathology, electrothermal capsulorrhaphy was effective and had few complications. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, case series without controls.

    Title Arthroscopic Versus Mini-open Rotator Cuff Repair: a Comparison of Clinical Outcome.
    Date March 2006
    Journal Arthroscopy : the Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery : Official Publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: To compare the outcome of patients who underwent rotator cuff repair using all arthroscopic or mini-open repair techniques. TYPE OF STUDY: Retrospective comparative study. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 54 patients who underwent either mini-open or arthroscopic rotator cuff repair. Twenty-six patients underwent mini-open repair and 28 patients had arthroscopic repair. Follow-up averaged 33 months (range, 18 to 48 months) for the mini-open group and 19 months (range, 13 to 26 months) for the arthroscopic group. The patient groups were similar with regard to age, activity level, mechanisms of injury, associated findings at surgery, and tear size measured in square centimeters. The outcome for the 2 groups was evaluated using a modified American Shoulder and Elbow Society (ASES) score. Statistical analysis was performed using Pearson correlations and the Student t test. RESULTS: The tear size averaged 2.7 cm2 for the mini-open group and 2.0 cm2 for the arthroscopic group (P = .754). All patients showed significant improvement in their scores for pain, satisfaction, and function at the time of follow-up. The average preoperative and postoperative scores for the mini-open group were as follows: pain 17 and 27 (30 possible points), satisfaction 3 and 9 (10 possible points), function 32 and 53 (60 possible points), and total 52 and 89 (100 possible points) (P < .05). For patients who underwent arthroscopic repair, average preoperative and postoperative scores were as follows: pain 12 and 26, satisfaction 2 and 9, function 28 and 51, and total, 42 and 86 (P < .05). Improvement in scores within each group was significant, but the difference in total scores between the 2 techniques was not statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS: This study confirms that short-term results for arthroscopic and mini-open rotator cuff repair are similar and supports continued use of arthroscopic repair techniques. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, retrospective comparative study.

    Title Axillary Nerve Monitoring During Arthroscopic Shoulder Stabilization.
    Date February 2006
    Journal Arthroscopy : the Journal of Arthroscopic & Related Surgery : Official Publication of the Arthroscopy Association of North America and the International Arthroscopy Association
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: This study evaluated the ability of a novel intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring method used to locate the axillary nerve, predict relative capsule thickness, and identify impending injury to the axillary nerve during arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy of the shoulder. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: Twenty consecutive patients with glenohumeral instability were monitored prospectively during arthroscopic shoulder surgery. Axillary nerve mapping and relative capsule thickness estimates were recorded before the stabilization portion of the procedure. During labral repair and/or thermal capsulorrhaphy, continuous and spontaneous electromyography recorded nerve activity. In addition, trans-spinal motor-evoked potentials of the fourth and fifth cervical roots and brachial plexus electrical stimulation, provided real-time information about nerve integrity. RESULTS: Axillary nerve mapping and relative capsule thickness were recorded in all patients. Continuous axillary nerve monitoring was successfully performed in all patients. Eleven of the 20 patients underwent thermal capsulorrhaphy alone or in combination with arthroscopic labral repair. Nine patients underwent arthroscopic labral repair alone. In 4 of the 11 patients who underwent thermal capsulorrhaphy, excessive spontaneous neurotonic electromyographic activity was noted, thereby altering the pattern of heat application by the surgeon. In 1 of these 4 patients, a small increase in the motor latency was noted after the procedure but no clinical deficit was observed. There were no neuromonitoring or clinical neurologic changes observed in the labral repair group without thermal application. At last follow-up, no patient in either group had any clinical evidence of nerve injury or complications from neurophysiologic monitoring. CONCLUSIONS: We successfully evaluated the use of intraoperative nerve monitoring to identify axillary nerve position, capsule thickness, and provide real-time identification of impending nerve injury and function during shoulder thermal capsulorrhaphy. The use of intraoperative nerve monitoring altered the heat application technique in 4 of 11 patients and may have prevented nerve injury. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, prospective cohort study.


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