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Overall Rating:
3.5
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Total Ratings

23

Total Reviews

10

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Average Wait: 22 minutes
Ease of Appointment:
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Courteous Staff:
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Accurate Diagnosis:
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Spends Time with Me:
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Average Wait: 22 minutes
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Apr 25th, 2016

My daughter had surgery by Dr.Cockings when she was approx. 5 yrs old with great success . She had been treated by a female Dr. prior to seeing him with little help and very poor treatment! ( she was very hateful). 20 years later my red head would give anything to have him as her Dr. but she is an adult now, we are proud to say we would do it all over again.

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Very happy for over 7 years show details Very happy for over 7 years
by McKenzie Tanner's Mom on Feb 18th, 2016

My daughter saw Dr. Cockings first when she was 8 years old. She will be 16 next month and still enjoys her appointments. His staff is always understanding and helpful. I am not able to drive so there have been times they worked with me without making me feel bad, like some places do. Dr. Cocking's office is set up for the kids. They love leaving their art work for other kids to add to on the huge chalkboard wall. The colorful carpet and wall of magnets are a true reflection of Dr. Cocking's fun and playful personality. He has always made sure I was aware of what was going on and what was about to happen as he examined my daughter. He talks to her but for my understanding as well. After reading some of the reviews on here, I want to share a conversation that he had with my daughter after putting the diolation drops in her eyes. First of all he told her that the drops would sting but only for a short time. So, he put the drops in and told her it was ok to use the tissue he had given her to dab her eyes. He talked to her as she dabbed her eyes. She said "why do they have to burn, someone needs to make some that don't burn". He joked with her and told her that if someone found a way to make diolation drops that didn't sting they would make alot of money. They laughed as she dabbed a bit more before I knew it they had plans to invent "stingless diolation drops". Once she said that she was good he asked her if she wanted to go work on her chalk masterpeice, she jumped at the idea. As I walked out behind her, he explained that the drops will need a little while to work and that he would call us back in 15 to 20 minutes. He called a family that had a infant in a carrier and a toddler. The lady at the front desk asked him a quick question to assist a new patient with something on their way out. The family he had called had barely made their way to the exam room door when he walked back to them saying hello. I appreciate that he will take that few seconds to assist the family as they are leaving so they don't have to wait for a phone call after they have left. I also like the fact that Dr. Cockings plays an active roll from start to finish. I have never been offended by Dr. Cockings or his staff. I have Thaught to myself, wow that parent's attitude is going to cause their child to act out though. My daughter was diagnosed with Tyoe 1 Diabetes in 2008 she was 6. As you know having her eyes checked regularly is very important. She saw another eye doc in Lubbock twice before we found Dr. Cockings. The experience was very different. It was at a hospital in a Doctor's office clinic setting. We filed out paperwork and sat to wait, a nurse called us back and did as much as she could before having the doctor come in to finish up. I never felt like it was a good time to ask questions. I was always given a pamplet describing things like diabetic retinopathy, which tarrified me. When we first saw Dr. Cockings I felt like I could ask questions for the first time. I learned quickly that her eyes were healthy, not affected by her diabetes, and that if we continued to keep good control of her blood sugar levels, she should not have to deal with this "complication of uncontrolled Diabetes." Now that my Daughter is a teenager with a mind of her own, Dr. Cockings always takes the time to ask her if she is concerned about anything. They have had lengthy conversations about how important good control is. He suprised her during her last visit with a make up tip. He told her that her eye liner should be applied a tiny bit under where she had it. He explained that it will prevent eye irratation and make her eyes appear a littl bigger and really pop. She thaught it was halarious for a man to give her make up abvice. As a parent I know he was concerned about the eye irratation but he did a great job of making it mean something to her. I had told her many times to make this slight adjustment only to be ignored. From that day on she did what he suggested "to make her eyes really pop".

Doctor's Response

Thank you for the very kind words. I very much appreciate them. Thank you for allowing me to take care of your daughter all these years.

Jan 14th, 2016

He is exceptional with children and the parent's!

Doctor's Response

Thank you very much for the kind words. They are very much appreciated.

Nov 2nd, 2015

He didn't greet us or give very good direction on what to do upon entering the patient room. We waited an hour, just to be seen for 5 minutes. He uses the term "God" in a negative manner and was not very good with describing what was going on or what he found.

Doctor's Response

I am sorry I did not greet you when initially seen. I was called up to the front desk after I called the patient. Usually it takes time for patients with infants to move to the exam room after being called so I thought I could get away quickly. That may have thrown me off my routine. If an exam if a rule-out (another doctor is asking: does this patient have this condition?) and on a small infant the exams can be brief. I do a complete exam. I do a history, the child is dilated for 20 minutes and then I see them again if the exam is not on an emergency patient with a very specific problem. Waiting in the waiting room for a long time can involve problems with insurance or, on this day, I had a very very very elderly patient for whom everything takes time. No patient is the same. A schedule does not run perfectly. Some patients take much much longer than others and that is entirely unpredictable. And remember, ask questions if you don't understand or something is not explained well. It may make perfect sense to me, but that doesn't help if you don't understand it. I have no idea about the "God in a negative manner" statement. I don't speak about religion at all in my practice. I do use the expression "God has a sense of humor" but that is never in reference to patients or their problems.

Jul 7th, 2015

My three year old just seen him for the second time and he was very rude and scolded my child for not correctly pronouncing shapes calling a square a box. He then threatened him by telling my THREE year old "I will put burning eye drops in your eye for no apparent reason other than your not cooperating". I also feel as if he is very short with his patients and shouldn't be working with children. His equipment is outdated.

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Doctor's Response

I have never responded to a negative review but some of the issues in here need some further explanation. 1. The child called the square a triangle. I did not scold the child; I merely corrected him/her. There are only four shapes on the symbol chart: a heart, a circle, a square and a house. The house has a triangular roof so calling the square a triangle could lead to confusion. I like to practice the symbols with the children before actually testing their visiond so that they know and are comfortable with what the symbols are . Actually, if a child has difficulty with the "skwa" sound in "square" on multiple occasions, I suggest that they call it a box. 2. I cajoled this child multiple times into doing the chart correctly. By the way he/she was answering, it appeared that the vision in the good eye had gone down significantly. In that case, I would be concerned about an evolving process involving both eyes; possibly in the brain. Compressive brain lesions can cause whitening of the optic nerves. That would result in the need for dilation. The "threat" was a warning given after multiple previous attempts to get the child to pay attention and do the chart. The parent added the "burning" part; the actual statement was"you will be dilated for no reason if you don't start cooperating". I was implying that he/she was making a bad choice at this point. At least 95% of children over the age of 3.5 years who are not developmentally delayed can do the symbol chart. The child had not just turned three as seems to be implied; he/she was closer to four. 3. The parent also states that I was not patient with this child. The first time I spent at least 10 minutes trying to fit the child with glasses because he/she kept looking away. I spent nearly 15 minutes doing an eye chart with this child the second time. I did want the child to finish up the chart on vision testing and he/she did eventually and satisfactorily after the previous warning. 4. I am not sure what equipment is outdated in my office. The equipment used in eye lanes has not changed in many years in terms of function. If the parent is referring to my use of a retinoscope to figure out a child's prescription, that is standard practice in the pediatric age group. The use of a phoropter (the machine most people think about when getting their eyes checked for glasses) is not possible in children. A retinoscope is standard of care. A lens is placed in front of the child's eye and then the light reflection is used to determine the prescription for glasses. An automated version of this machine is not necessarily accurate in a child. I hope that clarifies the issues. I know I am not perfect and I have bad days as do all of us. There will always be personality conflicts with the parents of patients.

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not happy show details not happy
Mar 18th, 2015

When we went to see dr. Cockings exactly One year ago he told me my daughter had an astigmatism in one eye and perfect vision in the other. I was kind of shocked he did not prescribe glasses. To maybe fix the issue. Now one year later her eye sight has worsened and the eye that had perfect vision is now weak. Maybe i should of gotten a second opinion but i figured.....the Dr. Knows whats he Talking about. He was very nice. No complaints there.

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Doctor's Response

So, while I am here.... A child's prescription is dynamic. I can't place this patient. Some children have an unequal prescription. I can only assume that at one point the child was 20/20 in one eye and maybe slightly near-sighted in the other. A child in that situation will not usually accept glasses as they use the 20/20 eye for distance and the near-sighted one for near. The 20/20 eye probably then became near sighted over the next year because the child grew. An increase in size of the eye can make a 20/20 eye near-sighted. The need for glasses probably is just normal for the child with age. It wasn't due to a lack of glasses.

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Amazing Doctor show details Amazing Doctor
by Katrina W on Feb 4th, 2013

My daughter has been seeing doctor cockings since she was first diagnosed with estotropia 4 years ago, we absolutely would recommend him. My daughter has never felt uneasy in his care. There are so many things in his office to keep the children at ease. He is very patient with us and therally explains things to us.

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Dont judge a book show details Dont judge a book
Feb 6th, 2012

After reading a few reviews posted on random sites for this doctor, my mom, grandma and I took my daughter to him expecting the worst. We got there and I filled out my registration info and went to sit with my family. There is wall magnetic with letters to keep the kids entertained. Another wall is a chalk wall and they provided chalk for the kids to write withI swear we were in there not even 5-10 mins and he called us back. He had us laughing and showed care in what we were telling him. He had a video going for my daughter while we we in the room. He showed us not to judge a book by the cover. WE recommend!!!

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May be smart, but bad bedside! show details May be smart, but bad bedside!
Apr 30th, 2011

He put drops in my chld's eyes with no warning, then chided my child for protesting. He refused to explain ANYTHING to my child, but got flustered when my child didn't respond immediately. Called our child immature for age because he couldn't get immediate results when he ordered him to do something without clarification and the child didn;t understand. We are not isolated in this experience. His manner may be "different", but is completely disrespectful and unacceptable!

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Good doctor show details Good doctor
by Sissie Donnell on Nov 6th, 2008

Thorough exam. Good doctor.

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