Browse Health
Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)
33 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
The University of Texas Southwestern (1977)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice Award (2008 - 2011, 2013 - 2014)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2013)
On-Time Doctor Award (2014)
Associations
American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology
American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Affiliations ?

Dr. Rogers is affiliated with 10 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - St. Paul
    5909 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Frisco Medical Center
    5601 Warren Pkwy, Frisco, TX 75034
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano
    6200 W Parker Rd, Plano, TX 75093
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - Zale Lipshy
    5151 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Medical Center Of Lewisville
    500 W Main St, Lewisville, TX 75057
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Medical Center Of Plano
    3901 W 15th St, Plano, TX 75075
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • UT Southwestern St Paul Hospital
  • Baylor Medical Center Frisco
  • Medical Center of McKinney
  • Parkland Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Rogers has contributed to 89 publications.
    Title Directional Selection by Fisheries and the Timing of Sockeye Salmon (oncorhynchus Nerka) Migrations.
    Date July 2007
    Journal Ecological Applications : a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
    Excerpt

    The timing of migration from feeding to breeding areas is a critical link between the growth and survival of adult animals, their reproduction, and the fitness of their progeny. Commercial fisheries often catch a large fraction of the migrants (e.g., salmon), and exploitation rates can vary systematically over the fishing season. We examined daily records of sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) in the Egegik and Ugashik management districts in Bristol Bay, Alaska (USA), for evidence of such temporally selective fishing. In recent years, the early migrants have experienced lower fishing rates than later migrants, especially in the Egegik district, and the median migration date of the fish escaping the fisheries has been getting progressively earlier in both districts. Moreover, the overall runs (catch and escapement) in the Egegik district and, to a lesser extent the Ugashik district, have been getting earlier, as predicted in response to the selection on timing. The trends in timing were not correlated with sea surface temperature in the region of the North Pacific Ocean where the salmon tend to concentrate, but the trends in the two districts were correlated with each other, indicating that there may be some common environmental influence in addition to the effect of selection. Despite the selection, both groups of salmon have remained productive. We hypothesize that this resilience may result from representation of all component populations among the early and late migrants, so that the fisheries have not eliminated entire populations, and from density-dependent processes that may have helped maintain the productivity of these salmon populations.

    Title Small-scale Medical Waste Incinerators--experiences and Trials in South Africa.
    Date January 2007
    Journal Waste Management (new York, N.y.)
    Excerpt

    Formal waste management services are not accessible for the majority of primary healthcare clinics on the African continent, and affordable and practicable technology solutions are required in the developing country context. In response, a protocol was established for the first quantitative and qualitative evaluation of relatively low cost small-scale incinerators for use at rural primary healthcare clinics. The protocol comprised the first phase of four, which defined the comprehensive trials of three incineration units. The trials showed that all of the units could be used to render medical waste non-infectious, and to destroy syringes or render needles unsuitable for reuse. Emission loads from the incinerators are higher than large-scale commercial incinerators, but a panel of experts considered the incinerators to be more acceptable compared to the other waste treatment and disposal options available in under-serviced rural areas. However, the incinerators must be used within a safe waste management programme that provides the necessary resources in the form of collection containers, maintenance support, acceptable energy sources, and understandable operational instructions for the incinerators, whilst minimising the exposure risks to emissions through the correct placement of the units in relation to the clinic and the surrounding communities. On-going training and awareness building are essential in order to ensure that the incinerators are correctly used as a sustainable waste treatment option.

    Title Biocomplexity and Fisheries Sustainability.
    Date July 2003
    Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
    Excerpt

    A classic example of a sustainable fishery is that targeting sockeye salmon in Bristol Bay, Alaska, where record catches have occurred during the last 20 years. The stock complex is an amalgamation of several hundred discrete spawning populations. Structured within lake systems, individual populations display diverse life history characteristics and local adaptations to the variation in spawning and rearing habitats. This biocomplexity has enabled the aggregate of populations to sustain its productivity despite major changes in climatic conditions affecting the freshwater and marine environments during the last century. Different geographic and life history components that were minor producers during one climatic regime have dominated during others, emphasizing that the biocomplexity of fish stocks is critical for maintaining their resilience to environmental change.

    Title Beware of Payment Schemes and Bad Advice.
    Date February 2002
    Journal Texas Medicine
    Title Unrecognized Durotomy After Lumbar Discectomy: a Report of Four Cases Associated with the Use of Adcon-l.
    Date February 2001
    Journal Spine
    Excerpt

    STUDY DESIGN: This report describes four cases of symptomatic cerebral spinal fluid leak after lumbar microdiscectomy where ADCON-L was used. OBJECTIVES: To report that ADCON-L may exacerbate cerebral spinal fluid leak from unrecognized, small dural tears after lumbar discectomy. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: ADCON-L is a porcine-derived polyglycan that is used with increasing frequency in spinal surgery. It is advocated to reduce postoperative peridural fibrosis and adhesions. METHODS: Four cases of symptomatic cerebral spinal fluid leak after lumbar microdiscectomy were identified. Information on these patients was obtained by chart review. RESULTS: Three patients had small, inadvertent durotomies that were not appreciated at surgery even with the aid of a microscope. The dural violation in the fourth patient occurred at the previous epidural steroid injection site located on the contralateral side of the laminotomy. CONCLUSION: ADCON-L may inhibit dural healing and exacerbate cerebral spinal fluid leak from microscopic durotomies not recognized at the time of surgery.

    Title They Call It Claims Processing. I Call It Fraud Against Doctors.
    Date November 2000
    Journal Medical Economics
    Title The Arthroscopic Drainage, Irrigation, and DĂ©bridement of Late, Acute Total Hip Arthroplasty Infections: Average 6-year Follow-up.
    Date January 2000
    Journal The Journal of Arthroplasty
    Excerpt

    We present our experience with arthroscopy for the treatment of late, acute periprosthetic hip infections in 8 consecutive patients, treated from 1989 to 1994. After a hip aspiration confirmed the presence of bacterial infection, all patients underwent prompt arthroscopic treatment, which consisted of drainage, lavage, and debridement. Postoperatively, patients were given 2 to 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, followed by long-term oral antibiotic suppression. At a mean follow-up of 70 months (range, 29-104 months), no recurrence of infection occurred. No progressive radiographic loosening was noted. Based on this initial study, we believe that arthroscopic irrigation and debridement can benefit well-selected patients who suffer late, acute hip periprosthetic infections. Effective treatment requires early diagnosis, prompt arthroscopic debridement, well-fixed components, a sensitive microorganism, and patient tolerance to and compliance with the antibiotic therapy.

    Title Illness Must Be Understood Not in Scientific but in Human Terms.
    Date June 1995
    Journal Virginia Medical Quarterly : Vmq
    Title Patient-physician Covenant.
    Date June 1995
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Title Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection and Tuberculosis: an Analysis and a Course of Action.
    Date September 1994
    Journal Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
    Excerpt

    Tuberculosis, once on the steady decline in the western world, has resurfaced with renewed vigor in the wake of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) epidemic. People with HIV infection are both more likely to contract primary tuberculosis and at greater risk for reactivation of latent tuberculosis. Tuberculous disease may present with atypical signs and symptoms in HIV-infected hosts because of alterations in the immune system. Superimposed on the virulent interaction of HIV and tuberculosis is the emerging problem of multidrug resistant strains that often resist currently available therapies. HIV-positive health professionals working in high-risk environments pose a special problem, while populations unable to comply with currently available pharmacological therapies pose another. We have many tools available to combat the resurgence of tuberculosis, but new methods of diagnosis and new approaches to treatment are sorely needed.

    Title On Trust: a Basic Building Block for Healing Doctor-patient Interactions.
    Date September 1994
    Journal Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine
    Title Denture Labels Affixed with Light-cured Versus Self-cured Resin.
    Date August 1994
    Journal Journal (indiana Dental Association)
    Excerpt

    The use of a light-cured acrylic resin was compared to self-cured resin for sealing personal identification labels in existing removable dental prostheses. The light-cured material rated better consistently than the self-cured resin in lack of stain or yellowing, legibility of print, lack of porosity, marginal seal, and surface finish. Another valuable feature of this system was the reduced time required for completion of the procedure.

    Title On Trust: a Basic Building Block for Healing Doctor/patient Interactions.
    Date August 1994
    Journal The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
    Title The Influence of Attitudes on the Response to Aids in the United States.
    Date June 1994
    Journal The Journal of Infectious Diseases
    Title Clear Acrylic Resin T-bar Used in Denture Identification.
    Date October 1993
    Journal The Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry
    Excerpt

    A preformed, T-shaped, clear acrylic resin bar can be utilized as a vehicle for identification of an existing removable dental prosthesis. A printed label attached to the T-bar makes a convenient vehicle for embedding the label in the prosthesis with light-cured acrylic resin. The resultant finished surface of the T-bar assembly provides a protective cover and an exceptionally clear window for viewing the label. The procedure is time-effective and relatively easy.

    Title On Entering Medicine.
    Date May 1993
    Journal Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
    Title Kurt W. Deuschle As an Actor and Community Medicine As His Stage.
    Date February 1993
    Journal The Mount Sinai Journal of Medicine, New York
    Title Another Ode to High Technology--or Having a Coronary Revisited.
    Date May 1992
    Journal The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
    Title Medicine and the Social Contract.
    Date October 1991
    Journal The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
    Title Another Approach to the Aids Epidemic.
    Date September 1991
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Title Statement on the Risk of Contracting Hiv Infections in the Course of Health Care.
    Date July 1991
    Journal Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
    Title The Bright Spot About Aids: It is Very Tough to Catch.
    Date October 1990
    Journal Aids (london, England)
    Title The Formation and Properties of Wheat Flour Doughs.
    Date September 1990
    Journal Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition
    Excerpt

    Among the cereal flours, only wheat flour will form a viscoelastic dough when mixed with water. The viscoelasticity appears to be because the gluten proteins are water compatible and thus will swell and interact. The gluten protein's large molecular size and low charge density appear to allow them to interact by both hydrogen and hydrophobic bonds. Wheat flour doughs are also unique in their ability to retain gas. This property appears to result from a slow rate of gas diffusion in the dough. The third major unique property of wheat flour doughs is their ability to set in the oven during baking, and thereby to produce a rigid loaf of bread. Although not clearly understood, this appears to be a heat-induced crosslinking of the gluten proteins.

    Title Aids in New York City: the Role of Intravenous Drug Users.
    Date March 1990
    Journal Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
    Excerpt

    The key to the future of the HIV epidemic is the intravenous drug user. In New York City the future has arrived--intravenous drug use is now the predominant risk factor among new cases of AIDS. Our limited knowledge of most facets of drug abuse prevention and treatment and the emotional polarity and politicalization of the issues surrounding AIDS have made control of its spread among intravenous drug users very difficult. Clearly new research efforts are needed better to decide how to reduce the further spread of HIV infection among this group. But efforts to stop the spread cannot await these results. Intense and immediate efforts should focus on five areas for potential control of the spread of HIV infection among drug users: education, treatment on demand, expanding support services, providing sterile equipment, and readjustment of some of society's moral judgments that currently block action. Let us hope that in 10 years we do not look back and realize that we did too little too late while it was still possible to make a difference.

    Title Aids in the United States: Patient Care and Politics.
    Date February 1990
    Journal Daedalus
    Title Federal Spending on Aids--how Much is Enough?
    Date July 1989
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Title Aids in the United States: Patient Care and Politics.
    Date May 1989
    Journal Daedalus
    Title Health Indicators for an Aging Population.
    Date May 1989
    Journal Vital and Health Statistics. Ser. 4: Documents and Committee Reports
    Title Thoughts on the Role of the Generalist in Medicine, Circa 1988.
    Date April 1989
    Journal Journal of General Internal Medicine
    Title New York City's Health Care Crisis: Aids, the Poor, and Limited Resources.
    Date September 1988
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Title On Improving the Health of Children.
    Date July 1988
    Journal The Journal of Pediatrics
    Title Caring for the Patient with Aids.
    Date March 1988
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Title Some Observations on Having a Coronary.
    Date October 1986
    Journal The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
    Title The Early Years: the Medical World in Which Walsh Mcdermott Trained.
    Date August 1986
    Journal Daedalus
    Title Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going?
    Date August 1986
    Journal Daedalus
    Title The Early Years: the Medical World in Which Walsh Mcdermott Trained.
    Date July 1986
    Journal Daedalus
    Title Where Have We Been? Where Are We Going?
    Date July 1986
    Journal Daedalus
    Title On Iron Men in Wooden Ships: Some Thoughts on House Staff Training--1984.
    Date September 1985
    Journal Transactions of the American Clinical and Climatological Association
    Title Internists: More Specialists or More Generalists?
    Date May 1985
    Journal Annals of Internal Medicine
    Title Further Musings on Medical Education.
    Date January 1985
    Journal The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
    Title The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Programs in Dental Health Philanthropy.
    Date December 1984
    Journal Journal of Dental Education
    Title Cutting Medical Care Costs. Primum Non Nocere.
    Date November 1983
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Excerpt

    A serious slowdown in the nation's economy has led to widespread agreement that the rate of escalation of medical care costs must be slowed. In responding to the pressures to cut costs, physicians need to be guided by the basic tenet of medicine: first do no harm. In recent years, this nation has made extraordinary progress in improving health and longevity. A recent study suggestively links reductions in mortality to increased expenditures for health. Thus, physicians should watch closely how the nation reduces medical care expenses. We suggest a series of yardsticks that might track the effects of the nation's cost-cutting efforts on personal health. Keeping a careful eye on where people receive care, how frequently they see a physician, trends in mortality, and the adequacy or timeliness of care could help us keep our sights set on the continuing improvement of the health of Americans.

    Title Technology's Consort.
    Date April 1983
    Journal The American Journal of Medicine
    Title Where Does the Geriatrician Fit?
    Date March 1983
    Journal Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
    Title An Innovation in Physician Training: the Clinical Scholars Program.
    Date March 1983
    Journal Journal of Medical Education
    Excerpt

    The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars Program was developed to allow selected physician clinicians to acquire certain skills which are not part of the usual physician's repertoire. Begun in 1969 with support from the Carnegie Corporation and the Commonwealth Fund, funding has been provided since 1973 by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. By June 1981, 309 physicians had completed their training as clinical scholars, and a majority were pursuing careers in academic medicine. This paper recounts the factors and forces which led to the initiation and development of the program, its successes and failures, the problems faced, the achievements of clinical scholar alumni, and the program's current status.

    Title Social Ramifications of Control of Microbial Disease.
    Date February 1983
    Journal The Johns Hopkins Medical Journal
    Title Ambulatory Care--a New Research Frontier.
    Date January 1983
    Journal Clinical Research
    Title Some Musings on Medical Education: Is It Going Astray?
    Date September 1982
    Journal The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
    Title Who Needs Medicaid?
    Date July 1982
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Excerpt

    Faced by a worsening economy and a powerful public mandate to decrease taxes and non-defense government expenditures, many are calling for additional cuts in spending for Medicaid-a large, not very popular program that pays for the medical care of many of the nation's poor. Available evidence suggests that Medicaid has been far more valuable than is commonly realized: It serves a broad cross-section of the American people, its adoption coincides with major improvements in the health of Americans, and its costs per recipient are about the same as the costs of care per person for all Americans of similar age. Not widely recognized is the program's importance to the financial well-being (if not the very survival) of any major teaching hospitals and the majority of nursing homes in this country. Public and professional awareness of the accomplishments of this program may be a crucial factor in determining whether the cuts will spare many of the gains in access to medical care that have been made during the past two decades. If we do not wish to reduce needed medical services to the poor, health-care institutions and health professionals will have to cooperate with each other and with the government in developing less costly ways of delivering high-quality care.

    Title Subperiosteal Hematomas of the Orbit: Angiographic and Computed Tomographic Diagnosis.
    Date July 1982
    Journal Radiology
    Title On Humanism in Medicine.
    Date January 1982
    Journal The Pharos of Alpha Omega Alpha-honor Medical Society. Alpha Omega Alpha
    Title Thoughts on the Academic Center in the 1980s.
    Date September 1981
    Journal Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
    Title Who Should Give Primary Care? The Continuing Debate.
    Date September 1981
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Title Some Observations on Pediatrics: Its Past, Present, and Future.
    Date August 1981
    Journal Pediatrics
    Title An Era of Stress for Health Institutions. The 1980s.
    Date July 1981
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Excerpt

    The United States enters the 1980s beset with serious economic problems. The picture currently projected from long-term economic forecasts supplemented by national opinion polls for the early to mid-1980s suggests a downturn in our nation's economy and a sharp decrease in monies available for further growth or improvements in America's medical care system. These prospects have serious implications for many of America's most important health care institutions, their health professionals, and how plan for the future.

    Title General Medical Care in America: a Generalist-specialist Mix.
    Date April 1980
    Journal The American Journal of Medicine
    Title On Preparing Academic Health Centers for the Very Different 1980s.
    Date March 1980
    Journal Journal of Medical Education
    Title Medical Technology -- a Different View of the Contentious Debate over Costs.
    Date February 1980
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Excerpt

    There is a growing conviction that medical technologies are major contributors to escalating costs, and regulating them is generally viewed as the least contentious way to control expenses in the 1980's. Five forms of technology control are being discussed or developed. All aim to reduce costs by controlling big, expensive technologies in the class of computed tomographic (CT) scanning. We present evidence that technologies such as the CT scanner account for far less of the growth in medical expenditures than do the collective expenses of thousands of small tests and procedures. Furthermore, we suggest that each strategy for controlling large technology involves substantial practical and conceptual problems that would severely limit its effectiveness. We thus suggest a shift away from attempts to harness the big technologies, and toward incentives to encourage the more discerning use of all technologies. To this end, we propose changes in physician reimbursement and education and expanded insurance incentives to encourage physicians and hospitals to be more selective in the use of technology.

    Title David Preswick Barr 1889-1977.
    Date October 1979
    Journal Transactions of the Association of American Physicians
    Title The Contribution of Specialists to the Delivery of Primary Care.
    Date July 1979
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Excerpt

    Despite increased numbers of medical-school graduates and opportunities for "primary-care" specialty training since the mid-1960's, many believe that the shortage of physicians delivering generalist care will continue through the 1980's. Missing, however, is solid information on the role of physician specialists in providing such care. Two national studies have shown that one of every five Americans now receives continuing general medical care from a specialist physician. Our study suggests that, despite the current shortage of generalist-physician services, continuing specialist participation in primary care will lead to sufficient generalist medical services by the mid-1980's. Whether specialist participation is the most appropriate or cost-effective way to improve access to such care is unclear. However, until this question is resolved, more governmental regulation of graduate medical education may be unwise. Offering all physicains, regardless of specialty, more primary-care experience during residency training might better deal with this aspect of American medical practice.

    Title Yes, but What Do Internists Really Do?
    Date July 1979
    Journal Annals of Internal Medicine
    Title 37th Annual Charles V. Chapin Oration. The Scorecard: How Are We Doing in Health Care in America?
    Date April 1979
    Journal Rhode Island Medical Journal
    Title The Academic Medical Center: a Stressed American Institution.
    Date June 1978
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Excerpt

    In recent years, relations between academic medical centers and the government have become increasingly adversarial. Although the centers and the government were formerly partners in a number of health ventures, to the mutual benefit of both, the climate is now too often confrontational. It is a confrontation in which there will be no winners, but the larger society may be the loser. A number of pressures on academic centers have helped to contribute to this situation. The federal sector and academic medical institutions must understand one another better and rediscover effective ways to preserve the special strengths of academic medicine in this country.

    Title Setting of Priorities for Health Care Delivery.
    Date November 1977
    Journal Clinical Research
    Title The Challenge of Primary Care.
    Date November 1977
    Journal Daedalus
    Title The Twin Responsibility of the Physician in Disease and Illness.
    Date April 1977
    Journal Israel Journal of Medical Sciences
    Title Primary Care: Some Issues.
    Date March 1977
    Journal Bulletin of the New York Academy of Medicine
    Title Letter: The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
    Date September 1976
    Journal Journal of Community Health
    Title Similarities in Coronary Flow Between External Counterpulsation and Intra-aortic Balloon Pumping.
    Date August 1976
    Journal The American Journal of Physiology
    Excerpt

    The ability of external counterpulsation (Cardiassist) and intra-aortic balloon pumping (AVCO) to influence collateral coronary blood flow in ischemic myocardium was measured in anesthetized dogs. Cardiac output and heart rate (atrial pacing) were held constant on right-heart bypass. Both external counterpulsation and balloon pumping augmented peak diastolic pressure (30 mmHg and 38 mmHg, respectively), while mean aortic pressure, peak left-ventricular pressure, left-ventricular end-diastolic pressure, maximum left-ventricular dp/dt, hematocrit, and osmolality remained unchanged. Regional coronary blood flow was measured using 9-mum radioactive microspheres. External counterpulsation and balloon pumping begun immediately following ligation of the left-anterior descending coronary artery significantly increased collateral coronary blood flow 29 +/- 7.5% (SE, P is less than .01) and 20 +/- 8% (P is less than .05), respectively, to ischemic myocardium. This redistribution of collateral coronary blood flow produced by both methods of counterpulsation was primarily to the subepicardial region of the ischemic myocardium. The mechanism responsible for the measured increases in collateral coronary blood flow appears most likely to be an increased pressure gradient produced by diastolic augmentation.

    Title Presidential Address on Technologic Restraint.
    Date July 1976
    Journal Transactions of the Association of American Physicians
    Title Medical Academe and the Problems of Primary Care.
    Date February 1976
    Journal Journal of Medical Education
    Title On the Selection of Priorities for an Emerging Foundation of National Scope.
    Date December 1975
    Journal Ciba Foundation Symposium
    Title Medical Academy and the Problems of Health Care Provision.
    Date December 1975
    Journal Archives of Internal Medicine
    Title On Technologic Restraint.
    Date December 1975
    Journal Archives of Internal Medicine
    Title Catalysts for Model Building.
    Date May 1975
    Journal Hospitals
    Title A Private Sector View of Public Health Today.
    Date July 1974
    Journal American Journal of Public Health
    Title M. Glenn Koenig, 1931-1972.
    Date June 1974
    Journal Transactions of the Association of American Physicians
    Title Medicine and Change.
    Date November 1973
    Journal The Johns Hopkins Medical Journal
    Title Shattuck Lecture--the American Health-care Scene. Views from a Foundation Perspective.
    Date July 1973
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Title Identification of Mountebank Healing Artists.
    Date June 1973
    Journal The Journal of School Health
    Title The Hepatic Uptake of Bacterial Endotoxin. I. The Influence of Humoral and Cellular Factors.
    Date December 1969
    Journal Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine. Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine (new York, N.y.)
    Title Treatment of Disseminated Mycotic Infectioons. A New Approach to Amphotericin B Therapy.
    Date October 1968
    Journal The American Journal of Medicine
    Title Antitoxin Treatment for Botulism.
    Date August 1968
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Title Studies on Human Leukocyte Motility. Ii. Effects of Bacterial Endotoxin on Leukocyte Migration, Adhesiveness, and Aggregation.
    Date June 1968
    Journal The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine
    Title Serum Factors and the Reticuloendothelial Uptake of Staphylococcus Aureus. I. The Role of Whole Serum.
    Date May 1968
    Journal Journal of Immunology (baltimore, Md. : 1950)
    Title Further Observations on the Mechanism of Reticuloendothelial Blockade.
    Date January 1968
    Journal The Journal of Experimental Medicine
    Title Type B Botulism in Man.
    Date April 1967
    Journal The American Journal of Medicine
    Title Studies on Human Leukocyte Motility. I. Effects of Alterations in Ph, Electrolyte Concentration, and Phagocytosis on Leukocyte Migration, Adhesiveness, and Aggregation.
    Date January 1967
    Journal The Journal of Experimental Medicine
    Title The Problem of Gram-negative Bacteremia and Its Management.
    Date December 1965
    Journal Southern Medical Journal

    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Jeanne Sheffield

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    17 years experience
    Dallas, TX

    Dr. James Alexander

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    19 years experience
    Dallas, TX

    Dr. Ruth Word

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    32 years experience
    Dallas, TX

    Dr. Barbara Hoffman

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    23 years experience
    Dallas, TX

    Dr. David Nelson

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    49 years experience
    Dallas, TX

    Dr. Debra Richardson

    Internal Medicine
    9 years experience
    Dallas, TX
    Search All Similar Doctors