Otolaryngologists
26 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Chm ENT - Canton Clinic
45250 Cherry Hl
Detroit, MI 48201
313-745-5227
Locations and availability (5)

Education ?

Medical School Score
Des Moines University (1984)
  • Currently 1 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Hour Detroit Magazine's Top Docs (2011)
Detroit Hour Magazine's Top Docs (2010)
Hour Detroit Magazine's Top Docs (2010)
Hour Detroit Magazine's Top Docs (2010), Hour Detroit Magazine's Top Docs (2011)
Patients' Choice Award (2008 - 2011, 2013)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2009 - 2010)
Top 10 Doctor - Metro Area (2014)
Metro Detroit
Otolaryngologist
Associations
American Academy of Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery

Affiliations ?

Dr. Madgy is affiliated with 22 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe
    Otolaryngology
    468 Cadieux Rd, Grosse Pointe, MI 48230
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • St. John Macomb-Oakland Hospital (Macomb Center)
    Otolaryngology
    11800 E 12 Mile Rd, Warren, MI 48093
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital,Troy
    Otolaryngology
    44201 Dequindre Rd, Troy, MI 48085
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • DMC - Sinai-Grace Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    6071 W Outer Dr, Detroit, MI 48235
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center
    Otolaryngology
    18101 Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn, MI 48124
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Harper University Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    3990 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Detroit Receiving Hospital & University Health Center
    Otolaryngology
    4201 Saint Antoine St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Oakwood Annapolis Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    33155 Annapolis St, Wayne, MI 48184
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
    Otolaryngology
    3601 W 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48073
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    1 William Carls Dr, Commerce Township, MI 48382
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Henry Ford Macomb Hospitals
    Otolaryngology
    15855 19 Mile Rd, Clinton Township, MI 48038
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Harper Hospital
  • Children's Hospital of Michigan
    3901 Beaubien St, Detroit, MI 48201
  • Sinai-Grace Hospital
    6071 W Outer Dr, Detroit, MI 48235
  • Annapolis Center-Oakwood Hospital
  • Beaumont Affiliation & Years on StaffRoyal Oak
  • Childrens Hosp Of Michigan, Detroit, Mi
  • Royal Oak (9 Years
  • OAKWOOD HOSPITAL & MEDICAL CENTER DEARBORN
  • HARPER UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL & HUTZEL WOMEN'S HOSPIT
  • Royal Oak
  • Oakwood Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Madgy has contributed to 15 publications.
    Title Nut Midline Carcinoma Mimicking Tonsillitis in an Eight-year-old Girl.
    Date November 2011
    Journal The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology
    Excerpt

    We review a unique case of NUT midline carcinoma that presented in a young girl with an initial diagnosis of tonsillar abscess. We stress the importance of assaying poorly differentiated carcinomas in young patients for the t(15;19) translocation. Our patient presented with tonsillar enlargement and cervical lymphadenopathy mimicking acute tonsillitis. The clinical suspicion for malignancy arose after an aspirate from the tonsil did not yield any pus, and biopsy of a cervical lymph node demonstrated undifferentiated carcinoma. Further analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization was positive for rearrangements in both BRD4 and NUT genes consistent with NUT carcinoma. In addition, fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) revealed a very high standard uptake value in both the primary tumor and metastatic foci, suggesting that FDG-PET could be a useful tool in the staging and follow-up of NUT midline carcinoma.

    Title Management of Complicated Facial Hemangiomas with Beta-blocker (propranolol) Therapy.
    Date October 2010
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Title A Simple Surgical Technique Using the Plasma Hook for Correcting Acquired Nasopharyngeal Stenosis.
    Date March 2005
    Journal The Laryngoscope
    Title Pediatric Total Tonsillectomy Using Coblation Compared to Conventional Electrosurgery: a Prospective, Controlled Single-blind Study.
    Date June 2004
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Postoperative recovery after tonsillectomy using Coblation excision (CES) was compared with conventional electrosurgery (ES). STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Patients aged 3 to 12 years from 3 clinical sites were randomly assigned and blinded to receive tonsillectomy using CES (n = 44) or ES (n = 45). RESULTS: Operative parameters did not differ between groups. Return to normal diet, activity, and pain-free status were similar, although fewer CES patients contacted the physician regarding postoperative complications (33% vs 54%; p = 0.081), experienced nausea (35% vs 62%, p = 0.013), or had localized site-specific swelling (p < 0.05) during the 2 weeks after surgery. In addition, CES children tended to discontinue prescription narcotics 1 day earlier than ES patients (7 vs 8 days, p = 0.071) and took one half as many daily doses. More CES than ES parents rated the postoperative experience as 'better than expected' (79% vs 60%, p = 0.055). CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: Children who received CES tonsillectomy appeared to experience a better quality postoperative course, with no detriment to operative benefits of conventional electrosurgery.

    Title Airway Management in Mucopolysaccharide Storage Disorders.
    Date March 2004
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    Mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS), a group of disorders caused by a genetic disruption, create a special challenge for the otolaryngologist. With the rare types of MPS IV and MPS 1 S, a skilled practitioner is required to abate airway management complications. The erratic deposits of mucopolysaccharides throughout the trachea should be taken into account when decisions to stent the airway are made. Proper management requires to provide an airway that is custom-made to meet the patient's needs. This is a case-by-case presentation of 3 patients with MPS who presented to the Children's Hospital of Michigan with progressive respiratory embarrassment. Discussed are the various issues revolving around our ability to provide proper airway management, from intubation to tracheostomy tube placement.

    Title Esophagoscopy for Removal of Foreign Bodies in the Pediatric Population.
    Date January 2004
    Journal International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
    Excerpt

    A retrospective chart review of children who had rigid esophagoscopy for potential foreign body ingestion from 1998 to 2001 was conducted at Children's Hospital of Michigan Detroit. All pediatric patients less than 11 years of age who presented with suspected foreign body ingestion in a hospital setting over a 4-year period were retrospectively studied. Patient characteristics noted included age, sex and clinical presentation. Pre-operative radiographic findings, esophagoscopy findings, clinical presentations and types of foreign bodies were recorded. A history compatible with foreign body ingestion dictates diagnostic endoscopy with or without radiographic confirmation, and an acceptable rate of performing esophagoscopy without finding a foreign body was found to be 6.2%.

    Title Otolaryngologic Manifestations of Rosai-dorfman Disease.
    Date August 2001
    Journal International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: To describe an unusual head and neck occurrence of Rosai-Dorfman Disease (RDD) and to review the otolaryngologic manifestations of this rare entity. METHODS: A case presentation with review of the literature describing Rosai-Dorfman Disease and its head and neck involvement. Setting: A tertiary care, urban children's hospital. RESULTS: This is the first description, to the best of our knowledge, of RDD [Sinus Histiocytosis with Massive Lymphadenopathy (SHML)] involving bilateral external auditory canals and middle ear in a 12 year old patient previously diagnosed with 'asthma' and hearing loss. This patient also had extensive involvement of the tracheobronchial tree. Representative clinical, radiographic and histological findings are presented. Its etiology, diagnosis and management are also reviewed. CONCLUSION: This is the first reported case of middle ear and external auditory canal involvement of RDD in a patient with hearing loss and associated tracheobronchial lesions. RDD, although rare, may be considered in the differential diagnosis of unusual histiocytic lesions of the external auditory canal, especially with findings of similar or comparable lesions involving the respiratory tract. Confirmation is with identification of emperipolesis and appropriate immunohistochemical staining (S-100 positive, CD-68 positive and CD-1a negative). Intervention is recommended in cases where there is increased risk of mortality, as in severe obstruction of the tracheobronchial tree. Otherwise, since these lesions are self-limiting, the patients can be observed closely.

    Title Unilateral Conductive Hearing Loss Secondary to a High Jugular Bulb in a Pediatric Patient.
    Date September 1997
    Journal Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
    Excerpt

    A high jugular bulb is not an uncommon otologic anomaly. It may be noted as an incidental finding on physical exam, middle ear surgery, or computed tomography of the temporal bones. Frequently the patient is asymptomatic, but a high jugular bulb can occasionally cause tinnitus or conductive hearing loss. The case of a seven-year-old black male with unilateral conductive hearing loss secondary to a high jugular bulb is presented. The diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and management of a conductive hearing loss associated with a high jugular bulb are discussed.

    Title Pediatric Tracheotomy Discharge Teaching: a Comprehensive Checklist Format.
    Date January 1996
    Journal International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
    Excerpt

    Discharge planning for a child undergoing a tracheotomy is a complex process. In 1989, a multidisciplinary team at Children's Hospital of Michigan developed specific discharge criteria in a checklist format to address all facets of home care for these patients. We present and discuss the checklist. A survey of user satisfaction with the checklist demonstrated that 80% of parents and care-givers felt well-prepared by this format at the time their child was discharged from the hospital with a new tracheotomy. We conclude that the protocol allows for comprehensive and efficient discharge teaching of parents and care-givers for children with new tracheotomies.

    Title The Incidence of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Recurrent Croup.
    Date October 1995
    Journal International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
    Excerpt

    The incidence of gastroesophageal reflux in recurrent croup was evaluated by a retrospective analysis of patients at the Children's Hospital of Michigan from 1986 to 1991. Sixty-six patients required hospitalization for recurrent croup during this 6-year period. Of the patients evaluated, 47% with recurrent croup had an additional diagnosis established of gastroesophageal reflux. In patients with three or more hospitalizations for croup, there was a 63% association with gastroesophageal reflux. Compared to all patients with recurrent croup, the patients with gastroesophageal reflux tended to be younger and had a shorter interval between episodes of croup. A prospective series of six cases of recurrent croup was seen in consultation. The diagnostic procedures involving lipid-laden macrophage quantitation, endoscopy, and gastroesophageal reflux scintiscans were utilized to establish the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux with tracheal aspiration. The results of these studies and the follow-up is discussed.

    Title The Enlarged Vestibular Aqueduct Syndrome (eva Syndrome).
    Date January 1994
    Journal Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
    Excerpt

    The presentation to the Department of Pediatric Otolaryngology at the Children's Hospital of Michigan of a series of patients with sensorineural hearing loss and enlargement of the vestibular aqueduct prompted exploratory tympanotomy in three patients (two unilateral and one bilateral), for a total of four ears. These explorations were prompted by progression and/or fluctuation of hearing levels. The discovery of abnormal round windows in all four ears with a post-traumatic fistula present in one ear suggested the presence of a new association. A previously undescribed association of an enlarged vestibular aqueduct, sensorineural hearing loss and round window abnormality with potential fistula formation was identified. A review of the anatomy and physiology, literature review, and a prospective analysis with discussion of eight patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome evaluated and treated at Children's Hospital of Michigan, is presented. We conclude that all children with sensorineural hearing loss should undergo extensive evaluation to determine etiology, including radiographic studies of the temporal bone. Further, the presence of an enlarged vestibular aqueduct should prompt the otolaryngologist to consider the presence of a round window abnormality and the potential for predisposition to perilymph fistula.

    Title An Analysis of the Inferior Based Tracheal Flap for Pediatric Tracheotomy.
    Date July 1993
    Journal International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
    Excerpt

    In the past, various tracheotomy incisions have been used at the Children's Hospital of Michigan with the occurrence of complications related to accidental decannulation and immediate recannulation. Since that time the inferior based tracheal cartilage flap has been used to minimize early complications. A retrospective study of 126 pediatric tracheotomies performed at the Children's Hospital of Michigan from June 1986 to January 1991 was reviewed. Only tracheotomies performed by a staff otolaryngologist utilizing the inferior based tracheal cartilage flaps were reviewed. This study includes patients with a 6 month to 5 year follow up. The early complication rate was 4%, while the late was 50%. Stomal granulation tissue was comparatively increased in this series of patients but did not hinder decannulation. We consider the use of the inferior based tracheal cartilage flap in the pediatric population a safe and effective technique without increasing the morbidity of long-term tracheotomy.

    Title Postoperative Technetium Scanning in Patients with Submandibular Duct Diversion.
    Date January 1993
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    Submandibular duct diversion is a common procedure for refractory sialorrhea in children. The procedure reroutes Wharton's ducts from the floor of the mouth to the tongue base. As the majority of saliva in the resting state is produced by the submandibular glands, rerouting markedly decreases sialorrhea. However, the procedure has been criticized in that diversion may cause fibrosis and stricture of the ducts. The gland would atrophy, and the physiologic functions of saliva would be lost. Glandular function of six patients with cerebral palsy (mean age, 14.7 years) was evaluated by technetium scanning (mean time after surgery, 43 months). Four patients had normal bilateral function; two patients had no function in one gland but normal function in the contralateral gland. We conclude that bilateral submandibular duct diversion maintains long-term function in at least one gland.

    Title Congenital Subglottic Hemangioma: Frequency of Symmetric Subglottic Narrowing on Frontal Radiographs of the Neck.
    Date December 1992
    Journal Ajr. American Journal of Roentgenology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE. This study was undertaken to determine how often symmetric subglottic airway narrowing is present in cases of infantile subglottic stenosis and to determine if the radiographic finding has any association with the anatomic location of the hemangioma. MATERIALS AND METHODS. All cases (n = 12) of endoscopically proved subglottic hemangioma from 1976 to 1991 were collected from the records at Children's Hospital of Michigan. In 10 cases, high-kilovoltage magnification studies or frontal radiographs of the neck were available for review by two observers who classified the subglottic narrowing as either symmetric or asymmetric. The radiographic findings in these 10 cases were then compared with the location and extent of the lesion as described endoscopically. RESULTS. In 50% of cases (n = 5), narrowing of the subglottic airway was symmetric. In four of these the hemangioma was either situated on the posterior wall or was circumferential, and in the remaining one an associated marked fibrotic reaction to a lateral wall lesion was present. All other lesions were on the lateral wall, and asymmetric subglottic airway narrowing was consistently shown on radiographs. CONCLUSION. Our results show that subglottic hemangioma often manifests as a symmetric subglottic airway narrowing and that the anatomic location of the hemangioma appears to be associated with the appearance on radiographs.

    Title Pediatric Tracheotomy: a Review of Technique.
    Date August 1992
    Journal American Journal of Otolaryngology

    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Michael Haupert

    Otolaryngology
    22 years experience
    Detroit, MI

    Dr. George Yoo

    Otolaryngology
    20 years experience
    Detroit, MI

    Dr. Michael Frett

    Otolaryngology
    Detroit, MI

    Dr. Gregory Kruper

    Otolaryngology
    Detroit, MI

    Dr. Esmael Amjad

    Otolaryngology
    9 years experience
    Detroit, MI

    Dr. Dennis Bojrab

    Otolaryngology
    31 years experience
    Detroit, MI
    Search All Similar Doctors