Otolaryngologists
36 years of experience

Accepting new patients
Center City East
Jefferson University Physician
925 Chestnut St
Fl 6
Philadelphia, PA 19107
215-955-6784
Locations and availability (1)

Education ?

Medical School
Drexel University (1974)

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Otolaryngology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Reiter is affiliated with 3 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    111 S 11th St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
    324 S 34th St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Methodist Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    2301 S Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19148
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Reiter has contributed to 59 publications.
    Title Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome and Postoperative Complications: Clinical Use of the Stop-bang Questionnaire.
    Date November 2010
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    To determine whether high risk scores on preoperative STOP-BANG (Snoring, Tiredness during daytime, Observed apnea, high blood Pressure, Body mass index, Age, Neck circumference, Gender) questionnaires during preoperative evaluation correlated with a higher rate of complications of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS).

    Title Meta-analysis of Surgical Techniques for Preventing Parotidectomy Sequelae.
    Date January 2010
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    To conduct a meta-analysis of the literature on surgical methods for the prevention of Frey syndrome and concave facial deformity after parotidectomy.

    Title Resonant Pedestal Pressure Reduction Induced by a Thermal Transport Enhancement Due to Stochastic Magnetic Boundary Layers in High Temperature Plasmas.
    Date January 2010
    Journal Physical Review Letters
    Excerpt

    Good alignment of the magnetic field line pitch angle with the mode structure of an external resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) field is shown to induce modulation of the pedestal electron pressure p(e) in high confinement high rotation plasmas at the DIII-D tokamak with a shape similar to ITER, the next step tokamak experiment. This is caused by an edge safety factor q95 resonant enhancement of the thermal transport, while in contrast, the RMP induced particle pump out does not show a significant resonance. The measured p(e) reduction correlates to an increase in the modeled stochastic layer width during pitch angle variations matching results from resistive low rotation plasmas at the TEXTOR tokamak. These findings suggest a field line pitch angle resonant formation of a stochastic magnetic edge layer as an explanation for the q95 resonant character of type-I edge localized mode suppression by RMPs.

    Title Hand-washing Practices of Facial Plastic Surgeons.
    Date October 2009
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    (1) To define and characterize knowledge of effective hand hygiene and its scientific basis among practicing facial plastic surgeons; (2) to review the existing literature of, basis for, and guidelines on hand washing in clinical practice; and (3) to motivate and facilitate optimum hand hygiene among facial plastic surgeons.

    Title Review of Atomic Data Needs for Active Charge-exchange Spectroscopy on Iter.
    Date February 2009
    Journal The Review of Scientific Instruments
    Excerpt

    The quantitative exploitation of active beam spectra is largely based on an advanced atomic modeling. Under the ITER operating conditions the penetration depth of a diagnostic beam into the plasma core crucially affects the intensities of spectral lines and hence the uncertainties of derived plasma parameters. A critical review of atomic data and an assessment of its error margins are, therefore, urgently needed. The aim of the present work is to verify the existing beam-stopping and beam-emission data for hydrogen beam in fusion plasmas. The agreement between the ADAS database and the present calculations is found to be within 5% for the beam-stopping data in a H-plasma. The calculation of beam attenuation in the presence of He-ash (4%) and Be ions (2%) demonstrates the agreement between the present data and the ADAS database within 10%. Finally, the maximum deviation of 15% is found only for beam-emission data at the electron density of 1x10(12)-2x10(12) cm(-3), which is significantly below the ITER density of 10(14) cm(-3).

    Title Our Journal, Our Literature, Our Culture, Our Voice.
    Date February 2009
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Title A Winged-helix Protein from Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus Points Toward Stabilizing Disulfide Bonds in the Intracellular Proteins of a Hyperthermophilic Virus.
    Date December 2007
    Journal Virology
    Excerpt

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) was the first non-tailed icosahedral virus to be isolated from an archaeal host. Like other archaeal viruses, its 37 open reading frames generally lack sequence similarity to genes with known function. The roles of the gene products in this and other archaeal viruses are thus largely unknown. However, a protein's three-dimensional structure may provide functional and evolutionary insight in cases of minimal sequence similarity. In this vein, the structure of STIV F93 reveals a homodimer with strong similarity to the winged-helix family of DNA-binding proteins. Importantly, an interchain disulfide bond is found at the dimer interface, prompting analysis of the cysteine distribution in the putative intracellular proteins of the viral proteome. The analysis suggests that intracellular disulfide bonds are common in cellular STIV proteins, where they enhance the thermostability of the viral proteome.

    Title Sailing the Straits of Approval: the Nature of Fda Approval and Its Implications for Surgeons.
    Date August 2007
    Journal Facial Plastic Surgery Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Use of Food and Drug Administration-approved medications and products for other than the approved indications is common in facial plastic surgery and violates no laws. Addressing practical concerns about such use strengthens the doctor-patient relationship and can minimize the risk of successful allegations of negligence in the event of untoward outcomes. The facial plastic surgeon can find support and assistance with off-label use in two general areas. Abundant scientific literature focuses on off-label use and addresses its practical, scientific, legal, moral, and ethical issues. The Food and Drug Administration also addresses off-label use in its own publications. It offers guidelines for physicians that, if followed, facilitate incorporation of off-label use into practice with minimal risk and maximum potential for therapeutic success.

    Title A New Dna Binding Protein Highly Conserved in Diverse Crenarchaeal Viruses.
    Date July 2007
    Journal Virology
    Excerpt

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) infects Sulfolobus species found in the hot springs of Yellowstone National Park. Its 37 open reading frames (ORFs) generally lack sequence similarity to other genes. One exception, however, is ORF B116. While its function is unknown, orthologs are found in three additional crenarchaeal viral families. Due to the central importance of this protein family to crenarchaeal viruses, we have undertaken structural and biochemical studies of B116. The structure reveals a previously unobserved fold consisting of a five-stranded beta-sheet flanked on one side by three alpha helices. Two subunits come together to form a homodimer with a 10-stranded mixed beta-sheet, where the topology of the central strands resembles an unclosed beta-barrel. Highly conserved loops rise above the surface of the saddle-shaped protein and suggest an interaction with the major groove of DNA. The predicted B116-DNA interaction is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assays.

    Title Treatment of Keloids and Hypertrophic Scars: a Meta-analysis and Review of the Literature.
    Date February 2007
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    Management of hypertrophic scars and keloids has advanced from crude, invasive methods such as gross excision and radiation to intralesional or topical agents that act on a cellular level. There is no universally accepted treatment regimen and no evidence-based literature to guide management. Our objectives are to present a list of available treatment regimens, their proposed mechanisms of action, and supporting evidence and to perform a meta-analysis of clinical trials to identify treatments with a better-than-even likelihood of improvement. We conducted a PubMed search through October 2005, identifying clinical studies of various treatments for hypertrophic scars and keloids. We graded the quality of each study, delineated the results into favorable vs nonfavorable, and calculated the statistical significance of the findings. The meta-analysis of 70 treatment series for various clinical measures showed a 70% chance of improvement with treatment; however, the mean amount of improvement to be expected was around 60%. There was no statistically significant difference between treatments. Most treatments for keloidal and hypertrophic scarring offer minimal likelihood of improvement. The magnitude of likely permanent improvement in any sign or symptom may be clinically meaningful but far short of cure. Novel therapies deserve further investigation but remain without proven benefit to date.

    Title Structure of A197 from Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus: a Crenarchaeal Viral Glycosyltransferase Exhibiting the Gt-a Fold.
    Date August 2006
    Journal Journal of Virology
    Excerpt

    Sulfolobus turreted icosahedral virus (STIV) was the first icosahedral virus characterized from an archaeal host. It infects Sulfolobus species that thrive in the acidic hot springs (pH 2.9 to 3.9 and 72 to 92 degrees C) of Yellowstone National Park. The overall capsid architecture and the structure of its major capsid protein are very similar to those of the bacteriophage PRD1 and eukaryotic viruses Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 and adenovirus, suggesting a viral lineage that predates the three domains of life. The 17,663-base-pair, circular, double-stranded DNA genome contains 36 potential open reading frames, whose sequences generally show little similarity to other genes in the sequence databases. However, functional and evolutionary information may be suggested by a protein's three-dimensional structure. To this end, we have undertaken structural studies of the STIV proteome. Here we report our work on A197, the product of an STIV open reading frame. The structure of A197 reveals a GT-A fold that is common to many members of the glycosyltransferase superfamily. A197 possesses a canonical DXD motif and a putative catalytic base that are hallmarks of this family of enzymes, strongly suggesting a glycosyltransferase activity for A197. Potential roles for the putative glycosyltransferase activity of A197 and their evolutionary implications are discussed.

    Title Perioperative Antibiotic Usage by Facial Plastic Surgeons: National Survey Results and Comparison with Evidence-based Guidelines.
    Date July 2006
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    To determine current practice for use of perioperative antibiotics among facial plastic surgeons, to determine the extent of use of literature support for preferences of facial plastic surgeons, and to compare patterns of use with nationally supported evidence-based guidelines.

    Title The Implications of "pay-for-performance" Reimbursement for Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery.
    Date July 2006
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To introduce otolaryngologists to outcomes-linked reimbursement ("pay-for-performance"), identify clinical practice implications, and recommend changes for successful transition from the traditional "pay-for-effort" reimbursement model. STUDY DESIGN: Policy review. RESULTS: Payers are actively linking reimbursement to quality. Since the Institute of Medicine issued its report on medical errors in 1999, there has been much public and private concern over patient safety. In an effort to base health care payment on quality, "pay-for-performance" programs reward or penalize hospitals and physicians for their ability to maintain standards of care established by payers and regulatory groups. More than 100 such programs are operational in the United States today. This reimbursement model relies on detailed documentation in specific patient care areas to facilitate evaluation of outcomes for purposes of determining reimbursement. Because performance criteria for reimbursement have not yet been proposed within otolaryngology-head and neck surgery, otolaryngologists must be involved to ensure the adoption of reasonable goals and development of reasonable systems for documentation. CONCLUSION: "Pay-for-performance" reimbursement is increasingly common in the current era of outcomes-based medicine. It will assume an even greater role over the next 3 years and will directly affect most otolaryngologists.

    Title Bacterial Motility.
    Date May 2006
    Journal Journal of Bacteriology
    Title Color-specific Enhancement of Digital Photographs for Identification of the Extent of Cutaneous Malignancy.
    Date June 2005
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To introduce the concept of active digital imaging to the literature and to support further investigation by showing the utility of photochromatography in the identification of cutaneous cancer margins METHODS: Digital color images of 10 cutaneous basal cell carcinomas were digitally enhanced to highlight color change in and around each lesion. After the most intense area of tumor coloration was located and sampled, the color was digitally changed to a sharply contrasting color across the entire region, thereby highlighting abnormal areas not readily seen by the unaided eye. The enhanced areas of predicted tumor extent were compared with digital images of the resulting defect after treatment with Mohs micrographic surgery. RESULTS: The extent of tumor was predicted with good accuracy in 5 cases and with fair accuracy in 2 cases and was not determinable in the remaining 2 cases. In no case did photochromatography overestimate the extent of the lesion. CONCLUSIONS: Digital highlighting of color change not readily seen by the unaided eye (photochromatography) can improve identification and localization of cutaneous tumor. Our findings justify further investigation into algorithms for photographic color detection and enhancement in the evaluation of tissue change.

    Title Toroidal Plasma Rotation Induced by the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor in the Textor Tokamak.
    Date April 2005
    Journal Physical Review Letters
    Excerpt

    The first results of the Dynamic Ergodic Divertor in TEXTOR, when operating in the m/n=3/1 mode configuration, are presented. The deeply penetrating external magnetic field perturbation of this configuration increases the toroidal plasma rotation. Staying below the excitation threshold for the m/n=2/1 tearing mode, this toroidal rotation is always in the direction of the plasma current, even if the toroidal projection of the rotating magnetic field perturbation is in the opposite direction. The observed toroidal rotation direction is consistent with a radial electric field, generated by an enhanced electron transport in the ergodic layers near the resonances of the perturbation. This is an effect different from theoretical predictions, which assume a direct coupling between rotating perturbation and plasma to be the dominant effect of momentum transfer.

    Title Complications of Mandibulotomy.
    Date October 2004
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Title Mercury Exposure in Protein A Immunoadsorption.
    Date October 2004
    Journal Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
    Excerpt

    Immunoadsorption is increasingly used to treat antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. To prevent microbial growth during storage, reusable protein A-Sepharose gel columns are primed with ethyl mercury thiosalicylate (thiomersal, 0.1% solution) and rinsed with phosphate buffer before use. In this study, we tested the hypothesis of systemic mercury exposure in protein A immunoadsorption.

    Title Prospective Evaluation of Novel System for Jejunal Feeding.
    Date May 2003
    Journal Surgical Endoscopy
    Excerpt

    Enteral nutrition should be restored immediately after trauma, acute lesion, or surgical intervention. Nutrition through nasogastric tubes is often not feasible in patients in the posttraumatic state in medical intensive care units because of recurrent episodes of gastroesophageal reflux and subsequent aspiration due to gastric paresis. Placement of nasojejunal tubes with available techniques is unreliable.

    Title Nodal Yield in Neck Dissection and the Likelihood of Metastases.
    Date March 2003
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to begin investigating the relationship between nodal yield in neck dissection and the likelihood of finding cervical metastases in T1 and T2 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). No clinical implications are drawn from this preliminary work. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: This study was a retrospective analysis of 564 patients with T1 and T2 HNSCC of the oral cavity, oropharynx, or hypopharynx from the National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program registry. A multivariate analysis was performed to evaluate the relationship between nodal yield in neck dissection and the discovery of cervical metastases. Other independent factors included in the analysis were gender, age, race, and primary site of tumor. RESULTS: Compared with nodal yield < 13, cervical metastases were more likely to be found for nodal yield 21-28 (P < 0.001, odds ratio [OR] = 3.68), 29-40 (P = 0.021, OR = 1.98), and >40 (P < 0.001, OR = 3.52). Increased age, male sex, and oropharynx and hypopharynx primaries were also associated with a significantly increased likelihood of finding cervical metastases. CONCLUSION: In T1 and T2 cases of HNSCC, nodal yield >20, increased age, male sex, and primary site correspond with an increased likelihood of finding cervical metastases.

    Title Biplanar Plating of Mandibular Fractures: a New Concept with in Vitro Testing and Comparison with the Traditional Plate-and-screw Technique.
    Date March 2002
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    To introduce the concept of biplanar plating of mandibular fractures and to present an in vitro comparison of this method with traditional use of a single mandibular plate.

    Title Acute Alcohol Withdrawal and Free Flap Mandibular Reconstruction Outcomes.
    Date December 2001
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    To evaluate the effect of acute postoperative alcohol withdrawal on survival of vascularized fibular grafts for mandibular reconstruction.

    Title Management of Vocal Fold Scar with Autologous Fat Implantation: Perceptual Results.
    Date December 2001
    Journal Journal of Voice : Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
    Excerpt

    Vocal fold scar disrupts the mucosal wave and interferes with glottic closure. Treatment involves a multidisciplinary approach that includes voice therapy, medical management, and sometimes surgery. We reviewed the records of the first eight patients who underwent autologous fat implantation for vocal fold scar. Information on the etiology of scar, physical findings, and prior interventions were collected. Videotapes of videostroboscopic findings and perceptual voice ratings [Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, Strain (GRBAS)] were randomized and analyzed independently by four blinded observers. Etiology of scar included mass excision (7), vocal fold stripping (3), congenital sulcus (2), and hemorrhage (1). Prior surgical procedures performed included thyroplasty (1), autologous fat injection (9), excision of scar (2), and lysis of adhesions (2). Strobovideolaryngoscopy: Statistically significant improvement was found in glottic closure, mucosal wave, and stiffness (P = 0.05). Perceptual ratings (GRBAS): Statistically significant improvement was found in all five parameters, including overall Grade, Roughness, Breathiness, Asthenia, and Strain (P = 0.05). Patients appear to have improved vocal fold function and quality of voice after autologous fat implantation in the vocal fold. Autologous fat implantation is an important adjunctive procedure in the management of vocal fold scar, and a useful addition to the armamentarium of the experienced phonomicrosurgeon.

    Title Ear Piercing for Individuals with Metal Hypersensitivity.
    Date August 2001
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To describe and evaluate an ear piercing and earring retention method for individuals with metal hypersensitivity. SETTING: Private facial plastic surgery practice associated with a tertiary care medical center. METHODS: Thirty-one patients with a history of hypersensitivity to metallic jewelry (62 ears) underwent earlobe piercing with an intravenous catheter. RESULTS: None of the patients experienced an infection or hypersensitivity reaction. All patients were able to wear nickel-free earrings for short periods without using the shortened catheter. CONCLUSION: Using the distal shaft of an intravenous catheter as an earring post sheath is a safe and effective technique that allows hypersensitive individuals to wear earrings in pierced ears on a limited basis.

    Title An Ethical Coding Perspective.
    Date July 2001
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Title Node Counts in Neck Dissection: Are They Useful in Outcomes Research?
    Date June 2001
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: We studied the unilateral nodal yields for procedures reported as standard or modified radical neck dissection (RND) to determine their applicability in outcomes research. METHODS: We analyzed the unilateral nodal yields for all procedures reported as RND for carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, and larynx at our institution from 1985 to 1997 (n = 64, no prior treatment). These included both standard and modified techniques, encompassing levels I through V of the neck. Each side of a bilateral RND was treated as a separate case. This sample was compared with a similar population from the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End-Results (SEER) registry. Nodal yield was obtained for RND alone and for unspecified neck dissection with primary excision for the same diseases and time period (n = 1499). RESULTS: The mean nodal yield from 64 RND was 30 vs 27 in the SEER data. The standard deviation was 14.7 compared with 17.2 in the SEER data. Values ranged from 7 to 66 nodes whereas the SEER range was from 1 to 97 nodes. Although the SEER data contain nodal yields from regional or selective neck dissection, we corroborate our findings of large variance in nodal yield from our RND sample. CONCLUSIONS: Large variance in nodal yields from RND may have undefined effects on quality of life, cure rate, and survival. Until correlation of nodal yields with outcomes is examined, we cannot know how to relate RND to outcomes.

    Title Laser Resurfacing of Silicone-injected Skin: the "silicone Flash" Revisited.
    Date May 2001
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    To determine whether prior silicone injection increases the risks associated with carbon dioxide laser resurfacing.

    Title Identification of the Stimulated Hemiretina in Primary School Children and Adults Based on Left and Right Hemifield Pattern Reversal Visual Evoked Potentials--a Comparative Study.
    Date March 2001
    Journal Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology
    Excerpt

    The analysis of left and right hemifield pattern-reversal visual evoked potentials (PVEPs) in children and the identification of the stimulated hemiretina testing different identification procedures previously applied to adults.

    Title On Market Share, Ethics, and the Exercise of Public Policy. Point of View.
    Date September 2000
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    Make no mistake about it: our ethics drive public policy. The failure to understand this has contributed to the alarming proliferation of inquiries and legislation about surgery for appearance, those of us who provide it, and the facilities in which we work. Office-based surgery, surgery for appearance, and the qualifications of physicians who do both are currently under intense scrutiny by public agencies. We will examine why this is so, how we might respond, and how we can minimize the intensification of such efforts in the future. Although we will not be able to crawl off the stage of society's microscope, we may be able to get the makers of public policy to use a lower-power objective if we demonstrate more ethical scrutiny of our own.

    Title Security Aspects of Teleradiology Between the University Centre and Outlying Hospitals in Tyrol.
    Date May 2000
    Journal Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare
    Excerpt

    We assessed a data security system using biometric fingerprint techniques and smartcards to control access to a teleradiology system. Clinical cases were initially discussed between the referring physician and radiologist in Tyrol using a video-phone. Subsequent correspondence, including the transmission of images between the referring physician and the radiologist, was carried out by e-mail using the security system to prevent unauthorized access to patient information. Seventy-eight teleradiology sessions were conducted using this data security system. Speed and stability of data exchange were unaffected by the additional security feature. The average log-on time to the system was 7.8 s. The average training time on how to use the system was 15 min. The radiologist was able to issue a final patient report using the system within 1.5 of the initial contact. The data security feature was user-friendly and did not hinder the normal teleradiology consultation.

    Title Tumefactive Cartilage Proliferation After Rhinoplasty. A Newly Reported Complication.
    Date February 1997
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    To describe and document the development of tumoral proliferation of cartilage in 4 patients after nasal surgery, a complication that, to our knowledge, has not been reported before.

    Title Methods and Materials for Wound Closure.
    Date February 1996
    Journal Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Over the years, a number of different modalities have become available to close wounds. Before selecting a method of wound closure, the characteristics of the specific tissues to be closed and the anticipated time for wound healing to occur must be considered. This article reviews the methods available for tissue closure for the head and neck surgeon.

    Title Isolated Castleman Disease of the Neck: Mr Findings.
    Date August 1995
    Journal Ajnr. American Journal of Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    Castleman disease in an 11-year-old girl appeared as a neck mass that grew despite antibiotic treatment. MR showed a well-defined solid mass, isointense with muscle on short-repetition-time/short-echo-time images, with a stellate area of central hypointensity on long-repetition-time/long-echo-time images, that did not enhance with gadolinium.

    Title Torn Earlobe: a New Approach to Management with a Review of 68 Cases.
    Date December 1994
    Journal The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology
    Excerpt

    The torn earlobe is a common problem, yet no objective analysis of causation or management is found in the literature. We present a series of 68 patients with statistical data on earlobe characteristics and cleft-related historical factors. We describe three new methods of repair: two for full clefts and one for partial clefting (ie, elongation of the piercing site without penetration of the inferior rim). We report follow-up from 4 to 10 years, with a 91% success rate for lobe appearance and a 1.2% recurrence of clefting. We offer guidelines for repair and repiercing based on lobe thickness and shape. We make recommendations for earring use based on lobe characteristics and historical development of the defect.

    Title Fetal Wound Healing.
    Date July 1994
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    Wound healing research has produced some startling discoveries during the past decade. Foremost among these is the observation that cutaneous wounds created and healed in utero are histologically indistinguishable from intact, unwounded tissue. Observers have documented that the acute inflammatory response and endogenous immunoglobulins that characterize healing in human beings after birth are absent in the fetal wound. Determination of the cellular and biochemical differences between fetal and postdelivery wound healing offers the promise of improved control over the process of tissue repair. Another promise of fetal wound healing research is the option of in utero repair of defects such as cleft lip and palate. We review what is known at present about fetal wound healing.

    Title Methods and Materials for Wound Management.
    Date July 1994
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    Rumor, myth, and unsubstantiated opinion have guided wound management since our forebearers achieved upright ambulation. The past decade has seen discovery of specific substances and pathways that initiate, control, and terminate healing. The roles of oxygen, nutrition, and growth factors are rapidly revealing themselves to wound healing researchers, and a scientific basis for wound management is emerging. Although the healing process still harbors much mystery, we know enough to improve our methods of wound management. We can now pick from a variety of tools for surgical incision. Scientific studies help in the choice of sutures, needles, and needle holders, as well as alternative closure methods and materials. Natural and synthetic tissue adhesives vie with staples and tapes for use in wound repair. Dressing materials may be active, passive, selectively interactive, or inert. Wound management can be changed to meet changing wound needs, with dressings as diverse as hydrocolloids, silicone gels, and amino acids. We have new ways of improving hypertrophic scarring and practical hopes for its prevention. This article offers a summary of currently available methods and materials for wound management, along with the scientific information that supports and guides their use.

    Title Unusual Subcutaneous Sarcoidosis of the Face.
    Date December 1992
    Journal Ajnr. American Journal of Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    Two unusual cases of sarcoidosis manifesting as subcutaneous masses of the face are reported: in the first, the lesion occurred at the site of an osteotomy for rhinoplasty and was the initial clinical manifestation of sarcoidosis; in the second, the skin lesion was part of a multisystemic disease. The cases were documented with CT. Sarcoidosis should be added to the differential of soft-tissue masses of the face.

    Title Invasive Intramuscular Hemangiomas of the Head and Neck.
    Date January 1990
    Journal Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
    Excerpt

    Intramuscular hemangiomas make up less than 1% of all hemangiomas [1]. These invasive and aggressive lesions appear to have a predilection for large muscle masses. They can be strikingly aggressive in the head and neck, and persistence despite radical treatment is common. Spontaneous resolution in adults to our knowledge has not been reported in the literature. We present a case report of an invasive intramuscular hemangioma involving the parotid gland, the masseter and pterygoid muscles, and the infratemporal fossa after local resection of an apparently isolated lesion of the lip and the submandibular triangle. We describe a detailed course of treatment and review the literature.

    Title Alternatives to Packing in Septorhinoplasty.
    Date November 1989
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    Nasal packing is considered routine by most physicians and patients at the completion of nasal and septal surgery. Yet the rationale for this maneuver is not clearly defined by reported investigation or logical analysis. We discuss 75 consecutive nasal surgical procedures completed without packing. There were two postoperative episodes of bleeding, both from pyriform aperture incisions for lateral osteotomy and both managed in the recovery room with an absorbable gelatin sponge. Technical refinements such as scrupulous preoperative history taking, through-and-through suturing of the entire septal flaps, small-caliber osteotomy, meticulous closure of all intranasal incisions, and proper application of a conforming dressing are essential for hemostasis. We offer specific procedural guidance to minimize the risk of postoperative nasal bleeding.

    Title Surgery of the Latent Image: Creative Clinical Photography.
    Date April 1987
    Journal Transactions - Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
    Title The Divergent Second Opinion: Eventual Outcome of Physician-changing.
    Date August 1985
    Journal Transactions - Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
    Title Cosmetic Considerations of Dental Arch Form and Function in Managing the Aging Face.
    Date November 1984
    Journal Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
    Title Evaluation of Unilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss.
    Date February 1984
    Journal Transactions - Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
    Title Myofascial Pain--the Real Temporomandibular Joint Syndrome.
    Date May 1983
    Journal Transactions - Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
    Title Diagnostic Imaging in Malignant Otitis Externa.
    Date April 1983
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Title Auditory Distortion.
    Date April 1983
    Journal The Laryngoscope
    Excerpt

    The auditory system responds to pulsatile energy flow from the environment. Compression and rarefaction of gaseous molecular mass is transduced into electromechanical forms, in order to produce an effect at the cortical level. For energy input to have consistent meaning, transduction must preserve information coded within the pattern of energy flow. Distortion, or alteration of the original form, occurs in many ways throughout the chain of generation/transmission/reception/interpretation. Parameters of energy flow are discussed, and distortion of each parameter is presented in a context which permits the development of a distortion-based analysis of common clinical problems in otolaryngology.

    Title Third Branchial Cleft Sinus: an Unusual Cause of Neck Abscess.
    Date December 1982
    Journal International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology
    Excerpt

    Sinuses and fistulae of the third branchial cleft or pouch are rarely encountered. We have cared for a child with a history of multiple neck masses and abscesses, in whom the causative factor seems to have been an unrecognized branchial cleft sinus. This case suggests the need for contrast radiography of the hypopharynx in children with recurrent neck abscess, and dramatizes the need to exercise all reasonable diagnostic options before proceeding with surgery of newly presenting neck masses in children.

    Title Dentoalveolar Considerations in the Management of Facial Trauma.
    Date October 1982
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology (chicago, Ill. : 1960)
    Excerpt

    Facial trauma may result in damage to the structures of the mouth, both by direct insult and by hindering access for routine oral health and hygiene measures. Successful management must include consideration of the stomatognathic system. The four major areas of consideration are dentoalveolar response to the forces of trauma and repair, evaluation and management of changes in vitality of the dental pulp, control of infectious and inflammatory periodontal disease throughout the period of evaluation and management, and restoration of the dentition and supporting structures. Guidelines are offered for use in the management of patients with facial trauma in each specific area presented for consideration.

    Title Spectral Analysis of Tuning Fork Generated Tones.
    Date September 1982
    Journal The Laryngoscope
    Title Concepts of Dental Occlusion.
    Date February 1981
    Journal American Journal of Otolaryngology
    Excerpt

    The otolaryngologist frequently encounters problems related to the form and function of the stomatognathic system. Much has been published over the past 50 years regarding the "ideal occlusion," but controversy continues to rage over the relevance of various occlusal parameters to the evaluation and management of problems involving occlusal dysfunction. A review of the literature on occlusion is offered, maintaining historical perspective while expanding each theory with relevant clinical correlates. A concept of occlusion is offered that may help in the evaluation and management of otolaryngologic problems involving the stomatognathic system.

    Title Regional Anaesthesia in and Around the Oral Cavity.
    Date June 1980
    Journal Transactions - Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
    Title Asymptomatic Nasal Septal Perforations in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.
    Date April 1980
    Journal The Annals of Otology, Rhinology, and Laryngology
    Excerpt

    Nasal septal performation has been considered a diagnostic criterion for systemic lupus erythematosus since 1971. However, little has been published in the otorhinolaryngologic literature regarding this lesion. We report six patients having asymptomatic anteroinferior nasal septal perforations and symptomatic lupus. No obvious clinical correlates were found. We support the hypothesis that nasal septal perforation in systemic lupus erythematosus is a common phenomenon, and attribute its infrequent detection to the asymptomatic nature of the lesion in this setting.

    Title Middle Ear Immittance in Rheumatoid Arthritis.
    Date March 1980
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology (chicago, Ill. : 1960)
    Excerpt

    Audiologic and electroacoustic immittance measurements were obtained from each ear of 23 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 13 normal control subjects. Audiologic findings revealed 14 patients with rheumatoid arthritis with hearing loss of either conductive (three patients) or sensorineural (11 patients) type, while only two control subjects demonstrated hearing loss, both of sensorineural type. Immittance data revealed abnormal findings in 59% of the patients with rheumatoid arthritis as compared to only 4% of the control subjects. The increased incidence of sensorineural hearing loss in the sample with rheumatoid arthritis could not be readily explained. The observed prevalence of abnormal immittance findings in patients with rheumatoid arthritis suggested either increased middle ear stiffness or increased stiffness associated with decreased stability of ligamentous anchorage.

    Title Head and Neck Symptomatology in Plasma Cell Dyscrasia.
    Date March 1980
    Journal Transactions - Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
    Title Tracheoinnominate Artery Fistula As a Complication of Radiation Therapy.
    Date January 1980
    Journal Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    Tracheoinnominate artery fistulization is a well-known complication of tracheostomy and of tracheal resection. The first known occurrence of this problem in a patient in whom no transtracheal procedure had ever been performed is reported, and high-dose radiation therapy delivered three years before for a mediastinal malignancy is suggested as the cause. No evidence of tumor was found in or adjacent to the tracheovascular communication. The tracheoinnominate artery fistula must be considered a potential complication of radiation therapy as well as of surgery.

    Title Head and Neck Symptomatology in Plasma Cell Dyscrasia.
    Date February 1979
    Journal Transactions - Pennsylvania Academy of Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology
    Title Stomatitis in Patients on Anti-neoplastic Drugs: Report of Case and Management.
    Date September 1976
    Journal The Bulletin of the Philadelphia County Dental Society
    Title Impact of a Standardized Protocol and Antibiotic-impregnated Catheters on Ventriculostomy Infection Rates in Cerebrovascular Patients.
    Date
    Journal Neurosurgery
    Excerpt

    Ventriculostomy infections create significant morbidity. To reduce infection rates, a standardized evidence-based catheter insertion protocol was implemented. A prospective observational study analyzed the effects of this protocol alone and with antibiotic-impregnated ventriculostomy catheters.

    Title Facial Plastic Surgical Outcomes and Clinical Depression.
    Date
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies

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