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Neurologist (brain, nervous system)
22 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score
George Washington University (1988)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Appointments
University of Southern California School of Medicine
Associate Professor of Clinical
Associations
American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
American Epilepsy Society
Epilepsy Foundation

Affiliations ?

Dr. Ko is affiliated with 4 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

  • USC University Hospital
  • Los Angeles County + University of Southern California Medical Center
  • USCNorris Cancer Hospital
  • Veterans Affairs Greater Los Angeles Healthcare Center
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Ko has contributed to 19 publications.
    Title Isolated Fatty Liver from Prolonged Propofol Use in a Pediatric Patient with Refractory Status Epilepticus.
    Date October 2009
    Journal Clinical Neurology and Neurosurgery
    Excerpt

    Propofol is a widely used rapidly acting sedating or hypnotic agent in the intensive care setting. It is generally considered safe in both pediatric and adult patients and has been used frequently in cases of refractory status epilepticus. The formulation of propofol is highly lipophilic to facilitate central nervous system penetration and has a high fat content, and prolonged infusions have been known to cause both extrahepatic complications and hepatomegaly secondary to fatty liver. Whereas extrahepatic manifestations of prolonged propofol infusions have been well reported in non-neurologic intensive care patients, cases of pathologically confirmed fatty liver in patients with status epilepticus are relatively few. Furthermore, these cases of hepatomegaly and fatty liver have been also in the context of concomitant extrahepatic side effects. We report on a pediatric patient with refractory status epilepticus treated with a prolonged propofol infusion who developed isolated pathologically confirmed fatty liver without the usually reported extrahepatic manifestations.

    Title Clinical Evaluation of Patients with Head Trauma.
    Date January 2003
    Journal Neuroimaging Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Head trauma is a very common and sometimes life-threatening medical condition that involves sports medicine physicians, emergency room physicians, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedists, anesthesiologists, rehabilitation physicians, psychiatrists, and radiologists; as well as allied health care workers such as physical, occupational, and speech therapists, clinical psychologists, neuropsychologists, and many others. Head trauma needs to be approached by a mutlidisciplinary team because it is complex. Specialized trauma centers incorporate all of these specialists and the best medical technology for optimal management of head trauma. The following chapters cover the use of different neuroimaging techniques, including CT scan and MRI, that greatly aid clinicians in evaluation and management of head trauma patients. These advances have truly revolutionized medicine and it has happened rapidly--pneumoencephalography was the neuroimaging study of choice less than half a century ago. The future of neuroimaging in head trauma will undoubtedly include advances we can not yet foresee but that will allow clinicians to continue to improve patient care.

    Title T Cell Vaccination in Secondary Progressive Multiple Sclerosis.
    Date July 2000
    Journal Journal of Neuroimmunology
    Excerpt

    Four secondary progressive MS patients were vaccinated with bovine myelin-reactive irradiated T cell lines from their peripheral blood. Patients were followed for 30-39 months, and monitored for immunological responses toward the vaccine, and for their clinical characteristics. Two patients showed stable EDSS score over time, one patient showed improvement by one EDSS step, and in the remaining patient her EDSS advanced over time. After the second inoculation there was a progressive decline of circulating whole myelin-reactive T cells, MBP143-168, PLP104-117, and MOG43-55-peptide-reactive T cells. In contrast the frequency of tetanus toxoid-reactive T cells remained unchanged. T cell vaccination (TCV) was also associated with a decline of myelin-specific IL-2- and IFN-gamma-secreting T cells. Twelve T cell lines (TCL) that recognize the inoculates were isolated from the peripheral blood of two patients. Ten of these TCL were CD8(+) and lysed the inoculates in a MHC Class I restricted manner. The remaining two TCL were CD4(+), and lysed the inoculates by MHC Class II restricted cytolytic activity. All T cell lines lysed not only myelin-reactive T cells, but also TCL specific for MBP143-168, PLP104-117 and MOG43-55 peptides. Control TCL specific for tetanus toxoid were not lysed. Neutralizing anti-Fas mAb did not influence the killing. Moreover, culture supernatants from two TCL which produce IL-10, were able to block the proliferation of myelin protein-specific TCL. This effect was abrogated using mAbs specific for IL-10. The data obtained indicated that TCV using autologous irradiated bovine myelin-reactive T cells promotes an effective depletion of T cells reactive against different myelin antigens.

    Title Contrast Agent Neurotoxicity Presenting As Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.
    Date March 2000
    Journal Neurology
    Title Isolated Echinococcus Granulosus Hydatid Cyst in the Cns with Severe Reaction to Treatment.
    Date March 2000
    Journal Neurology
    Title Electrocerebral Inactivity Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea.
    Date July 1998
    Journal Neurology
    Title Albendazole Therapy for Neurocysticercosis.
    Date April 1998
    Journal Neurology
    Title Source Localization Determined by Magnetoencephalography and Electroencephalography in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy: Comparison with Electrocorticography: Technical Case Report.
    Date April 1998
    Journal Neurosurgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE AND IMPORTANCE: Source modeling by magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) may be useful techniques for noninvasive localization of epileptogenic zones for surgery in patients with partial seizures. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: Simultaneous recordings of MEG and EEG, obtained in two patients, were coregistered on each patient's magnetic resonance image for direct comparison of these two methods with intracranial electrocorticography. TECHNIQUE: The average difference between MEG and EEG for localization of the same interictal spikes was approximately 2 cm in one patient and 3.8 cm in the other patient. One patient experienced a complex partial seizure during testing, which permitted comparison between interictal and ictal source localization by both MEG and EEG. The EEG ictal localization differed from the interictal one, whereas the MEG ictal and interictal localizations were more similar. In this patient, the MEG interictal source seemed to localize close to the ictal source, whereas EEG did not. The patients underwent temporal lobectomy after electrocorticography, and the results were compared with the findings of MEG and EEG. Although the results of both techniques agreed with the findings of electrocorticography, in one patient the MEG localization seemed to be more accurate. Both patients experienced good surgical outcomes. CONCLUSION: Both MEG and EEG source localization can add useful and complementary information for epilepsy surgery evaluation. MEG seemed to be more accurate than EEG, especially when comparing interictal versus ictal localization. Further study is needed to evaluate the validity of source localization as useful noninvasive techniques to localize the epileptogenic zone.

    Title Forearm Rolling Test.
    Date August 1994
    Journal Neurology
    Title Matrix Method for Tunneling in Heterostructures: Resonant Tunneling in Multilayer Systems.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Microscopic Calculation of Electric Field Effects in Gaas/alxga1-xas/gaas Tunnel Structures.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Simulations of Deposition Growth Models in Various Dimensions: The Possible Importance of Overhangs.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. E, Statistical Physics, Plasmas, Fluids, and Related Interdisciplinary Topics
    Title Effects of Vacancies in the Triangular Spin-1/2 Antiferromagnet.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Deposition Growth Modes from Numerical Simulations.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Localization in a Random Magnetic Field: The Semiclassical Limit.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Real-space Renormalization-group Study of the Phase Diagram of Two Coupled Quantum Spin-1/2 Chains.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Vibronic Coupling in C60 and C603-
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Ground State of a Model with Competing Interactions and Spin Anisotropy.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review. B, Condensed Matter
    Title Spin-wave Renormalization in Two-dimensional Antiferromagnets with Finite Hole Density.
    Date
    Journal Physical Review Letters

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