Urologist, Preventive Medicine, Medical Oncologist
15 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Center City East
Thomas Jefferson University
833 Chestnut St
Ste 703
Philadelphia, PA 19107
215-955-1000
Locations and availability (2)

Education ?

Medical School Score
New York University (1995)
  • Currently 1 of 4 apples
Residency
Univ Of Md Med Sys (2001) *
Urology
* This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

Awards & Distinctions ?

Appointments
Thomas Jefferson University Jefferson Medical College
Associations
Society of Urologic Oncology
American Urological Association
American Board of Urology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Glassman is affiliated with 7 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
    Urology
    111 S 11th St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Our Lady Of Lourdes Medical Center
    Urology
    1600 Haddon Ave, Camden, NJ 08103
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Underwood Memorial Hospital
    509 N Broad St, Woodbury, NJ 08096
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Methodist Hospital
    Urology
    2301 S Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19148
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Virtua West Jersey Hospital - Voorhees
    94 Brick Rd, Marlton, NJ 08053
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Virtua West Jersey Hospital - Marlton
    Urology
    94 Brick Rd, Marlton, NJ 08053
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Methodist Hospital Division of Thomas Jefferson University Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Glassman has contributed to 9 publications.
    Title Extra-gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor of the Pancreas: Case Report and a Review of the Literature.
    Date March 2008
    Journal Archives of Surgery (chicago, Ill. : 1960)
    Excerpt

    Gastrointestinal (GI) stromal tumors are mesenchymal tumors that arise from the GI tract. In rare cases, these tumors are found in intra-abdominal sites unrelated to the GI tract and are immunohistochemically similar to their GI tract counterparts. Primary pancreatic GI stromal tumors are very rare, with only 4 previous cases reported.

    Title Rhabdomyolysis After Laparoscopic Nephrectomy.
    Date February 2008
    Journal Jsls : Journal of the Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons / Society of Laparoendoscopic Surgeons
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Laparoscopic renal surgery has become a widely applied technique in recent years. The development of postoperative rhabdomyolysis is a known but rare complication of laparoscopic renal surgery. Herein, 4 cases of rhabdomyolysis and a review of the literature are presented with respect to pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of this dire complication. METHODS: A retrospective review of over 600 laparoscopic renal operations over the past 8 years was performed. All cases of postoperative rhabdomyolysis were identified. A Medline search was performed to find articles related to the development of postoperative rhabdomyolysis. Cases of rhabdomyolysis developing after laparoscopic renal surgery and common risk factors between cases were identified. RESULTS: The incidence of postoperative rhabdomyolysis in our series is 0.67%. It is similar to the rate reported in other series. Male sex, high body mass index, prolonged operative times, and the lateral decubitus position are all risk factors in its development. CONCLUSION: The prevention and optimal management of postoperative rhabdomyolysis following laparoscopic renal surgery has yet to be defined. The risk factors we identified should be carefully addressed and minimized. A better understanding of the pathogenesis of rhabdomyolysis will also be a key component in its prevention.

    Title Outcomes of Hand-assisted Laparoscopic Nephrectomy in Technically Challenging Cases.
    Date March 2006
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the outcomes of hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy in patients with significant complicating clinical factors. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of 322 hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy cases that were completed at a single institution from 1998 to 2004. Patients with a history of extensive abdominal surgery or prior procedures on the affected kidney, evidence of perirenal inflammation, renal lesions 10 cm or more in diameter, or level I renal vein thrombus were included. RESULTS: A total of 42 patients were included in this series. Of these, 16 patients had a lesion 10 cm or larger, 10 had a renal vein thrombus, and 10 had undergone prior major abdominal surgery. Many patients had more than one complicating factor. Another 6 patients had a history of prior renal procedures or chronic inflammatory processes involving the affected kidney. One Stage T4 renal tumor with paraspinous muscle invasion was successfully managed without conversion. The overall mean operative time and estimated blood loss was 235 minutes and 439 mL, respectively, with a mean hospital stay of 4 days. Four patients (9.5%) required open conversion (one renal hilar injury, two failure to progress, and one persistent bleeding from the renal fossa). Postoperative complications included pulmonary embolism in 1, ileus in 1, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation in 1 patient. One patient developed an incarcerated port site hernia requiring reoperation. CONCLUSIONS: Hand-assisted laparoscopic nephrectomy is an attractive minimally invasive option in the setting of significant complicating factors. This technique may facilitate the successful laparoscopic completion of these challenging cases with reasonable operative times, blood loss, and complication rates.

    Title Xanthogranulomatous Adrenalitis.
    Date July 2003
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Title Induction of Prostate Apoptosis by Alpha1-adrenoceptor Antagonists: Mechanistic Significance of the Quinazoline Component.
    Date March 2003
    Journal Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Diseases
    Excerpt

    alpha(1)-Adrenoceptor antagonists, have been documented to induce apoptosis and reduce prostate tumor vascularity in benign and malignant prostate cells. The quinazoline based alpha(1)-antagonists, doxazosin and terazosin but not tamsulosin (a sulphonamide derivative) suppress prostate growth without affecting cell proliferation. These quinazoline-mediated apoptotic effects occur via an alpha(1)-adrenoceptor independent mechanism potentially involving activation of the TGF-beta signal transduction pathway. This review discusses the current knowledge of the action of quinazoline-derived alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonists in the benign and malignant prostate and their potential therapeutic use in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. Finally, a molecular pathway is proposed for their observed apoptotic function against prostate cells. Increased understanding of the action of these established and clinically accepted agents would provide a basis for the design of safe, effective therapeutic regimens in the treatment of prostatic diseases.

    Title Complete Genitourinary Exenteration for Multifocal Transitional Cell Carcinoma in Renal Transplant Recipient.
    Date October 2001
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Title Concealed Umbilical Stoma: Long-term Evaluation of Stomal Stenosis.
    Date October 2001
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: The technique of forming a concealed umbilical stoma has been described previously and includes a posterior umbilical flap for improved cosmesis and stenosis prevention. We assessed long-term stomal stenosis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed retrospectively the charts of 46 patients (mean age at surgery 14 years) of whom 35 had undergone concealed umbilical stoma creation and 11 the Malone antegrade continence enema procedure for continent urinary diversion. Urinary stomas were created from appendix in 20 cases, ileum in 8, sigmoid colon in 5, bladder in 1 and stomach in 1. Malone antegrade continence enema stomas were constructed from appendix in 10 cases and sigmoid colon in 1. A total of 21 patients underwent urinary diversion and augmentation cystoplasty. RESULTS: At followup of 12 to 84 months (median 3.4 years) 93.5% of patients had an intact stoma with no need for surgical revision. Of the remaining patients 3 (6.5%) required revision of the stoma at skin level for stomal stenosis at 1, 4 and 38 months after initial surgery and 2 had a brief period of indwelling catheterization for correction of stenosis. CONCLUSIONS: The concealed umbilical stoma technique provides an excellent cosmetic result with a low rate of stomal stenosis in patients requiring intermittent bladder or bowel catheterization.

    Title Combined Effect of Terazosin and Finasteride on Apoptosis, Cell Proliferation, and Transforming Growth Factor-beta Expression in Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.
    Date March 2001
    Journal The Prostate
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Medical treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) targets relief of symptoms by causing either relaxation of the prostatic smooth muscle with alpha1 adrenergic blockade, or shrinkage of the gland with 5alpha-reductase inhibitors. We recently demonstrated that alpha1-blockers, such as terazosin, induce apoptosis in prostatic cells. In this study, we examined the combined effect of finasteride and terazosin on the rate of apoptosis and cellular proliferation to investigate their potential synergy at the cellular level. METHODS: Prostate specimens were obtained from men who were treated with either finasteride (n = 24), terazosin (n = 42), or combination therapy (n = 10) for varying time periods (1 week to 36 months) for the relief of the symptoms of BPH. The proliferative and apoptotic indices of both stromal and epithelial prostatic cell populations were determined. Antibodies against TGF-beta1 and TbetaRII were used to examine the immunoreactivity of TGF-beta1 and TbetaRII, respectively, in all prostate tissue sections. RESULTS: The apoptotic index in both prostate cell populations was significantly higher following the combination treatment compared to terazosin or finasteride alone. There were no significant changes in the rate of cellular proliferation with any treatment. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in TGF-beta1 expression in the prostates of patients treated with terazosin or combination therapy, while there was no change in TbetaRII expression. CONCLUSIONS: These results support the concept that induction of prostate apoptosis is a potential molecular mechanism underlying the combination effect of alpha1 blockade with 5alpha-reductase inhibitors in the effective treatment of BPH. The upregulation of TGF-beta1 implies a role for this ligand as an effector of apoptosis induction in response to alpha1-blockade or finasteride therapy of BPH patients.

    Title Bilateral Nephrectomy with Concomitant Renal Graft Transplantation for Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease.
    Date September 2000
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: There has been controversy about pre-transplant nephrectomy in patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Kidneys may be removed in these patients when they cause respiratory compromise, early satiety, increased abdominal girth, pain, hematuria or recurrent infection. We determined whether concomitant bilateral nephrectomy at renal transplantation is safe and efficacious. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between December 1996 and January 1999, 10 patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease underwent bilateral nephrectomy with concomitant renal grafting (group 1). We compared these patients to 9 with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease matched for age and gender who underwent transplantation only (group 2) and 4 with the same condition who underwent bilateral nephrectomy and renal transplantation as staged procedures (group 3). RESULTS: No patients died perioperatively. There was a lower rate of complications in group 1 than in groups 2 or 3. The only significant differences in intraoperative and perioperative parameters were operative time and intraoperative blood loss, which were greater in group 1 than in group 2. We noted no significant differences in groups 1 and 3. Patient satisfaction analyzed by a survey revealed that the 70% of group 1 patients who responded were satisfied with kidney removal and 7 of the 9 in group 2 desired native kidney removal. All group 3 patients already had a functioning renal graft but were satisfied with native kidney removal, although they would rather have undergone bilateral nephrectomy at transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: Our data imply that there is no higher morbidity or mortality when performing concomitant bilateral nephrectomy at renal transplantation in patients with renal failure due to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. There was a higher rate of satisfaction in patients who underwent nephrectomy and transplantation simultaneously, while those who did not undergo concomitant procedures strongly desired to have had that option. Bilateral nephrectomy may alleviate symptoms while providing greater room for renal graft placement. When done without transplantation, bilateral nephrectomy resulted in the highest number of complications. Our data indicate that if bilateral nephrectomy is performed as an adjunct to transplantation, it should be done at renal grafting.


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