Neurologists, Radiologist
27 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
21318 Foxcroft Rd
Middleburg, VA 20117
540-687-3098
Locations and availability (7)

Education ?

Medical School Score
Eastern Virginia Medical School (1983)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Appointments
George Washington University School Of Medicine And Health Sciences - Washington Dc
Assistant Professor
George Washington University (1995 - Present)
University Of Virginia School Of Medicin
Neuroradiology instructor
George Washington University School Of M
Assistant Clinical Professor Radiology
Associations
American Board of Radiology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Dubovsky is affiliated with 66 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • St. Luke's Cornwall Hosptal- Cornwall Campus
    70 Dubois St, Newburgh, NY 12550
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • White Plains Hospital Medical Center
    122 Maple Ave, White Plains, NY 10601
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Somerset Medical Center
    110 Rehill Ave, Somerville, NJ 08876
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Jersey Shore University Medical Center
    1945 State Route 33, Neptune, NJ 07753
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Vassar Brothers Medical Center
    45 Reade Pl, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Montefiore Medical Center: Moses Division
    111 E 210th St, Bronx, NY 10467
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • North Shore University Hospital
    300 Community Dr, Manhasset, NY 11030
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Ny Hospital Medical Ctr Of Queens,The
    5645 Main St, Flushing, NY 11355
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Margaretville Memorial Hospital
    42084 State Highway 28, Margaretville, NY 12455
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Ocean Medical Center
    425 Jack Martin Blvd, Brick, NJ 08724
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Northern Westchester Hospital
    380 E Main St, Mount Kisco, NY 10549
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Good Samaritan Hospital
    255 Lafayette Ave, Suffern, NY 10901
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • The Kingston Hospital
    396 Broadway, Kingston, NY 12401
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • SJRH - St John's Division
    976 N Broadway, Yonkers, NY 10701
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Columbus Hospital
    495 N 13th St, Newark, NJ 07107
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Benedictine Hospital
    105 Marys Ave, Kingston, NY 12401
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • East Orange General Hospital
    300 Central Ave, East Orange, NJ 07018
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Mt Vernon Hospital
    12 N 7th Ave, Mount Vernon, NY 10550
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Laurel Regional Hospital
    7300 Van Dusen Rd, Laurel, MD 20707
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • South Nassau Communities Hospital
    2445 Oceanside Rd, Oceanside, NY 11572
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Holy Name Hospital
    718 Teaneck Rd, Teaneck, NJ 07666
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Sharon Hospital
    PO Box 789, Sharon, CT 06069
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Phelps Memorial Hospital Center
    701 N Broadway, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • New York Methodist Hospital
    506 6th St, Brooklyn, NY 11215
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Jersey City Medical Center
    355 Grand St, Jersey City, NJ 07302
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Community Hospital at Dobbs Ferry
    128 Ashford Ave, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Sound Shore Medical Center
    16 Guion Pl, New Rochelle, NY 10801
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Peconic Bay Medical Center
    1300 Roanoke Ave, Riverhead, NY 11901
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Orange Regional Medical Center Goshen
    4 Harriman Dr, Goshen, NY 10924
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Hoboken University Medical Center
    308 Willow Ave, Hoboken, NJ 07030
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Northern Dutchess Hospital
    6511 Spring Brook Ave, Rhinebeck, NY 12572
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Mount Sinai Hospital of Queens
    2510 30th Ave, Astoria, NY 11102
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Cape Canaveral Hospital, 701 W. Cocoa Beach Causeway, Cocoa Beach Florida
  • Cape Canaveral Hospital
  • Hoboken University Medical Center
  • Catskill Regional Medical Center
    68 Harris Bushville Rd, Harris, NY 12742
  • St. John's Riverside Hospital-Park Care Pavillion
    2 Park Ave, Yonkers, NY 10703
  • Columbia Memorial Hospital
    71 Prospect Ave, Hudson, NY 12534
  • Jersey City Medical Center
  • Syosset Hospital
  • East Orange General Hospital
  • Atlanticare Regional Medical
  • Children's National Medical Center
    111 Michigan Ave NW, Washington, DC 20010
  • Englewood Hospital and Medical Center
  • Eatern Long Islan Hospital
  • Columbus Hospital
  • Unity Hospital Of Rochester
  • Jersey Shore University
  • Lee Memorial Hospital
  • St. John's Riverside Hospital
    967 N Broadway, Yonkers, NY 10701
  • Jersey City Medical Center, Meadowlands Hospital
  • St John's Riverside Hospital - Andrus Pavilion
    976 N Broadway, Yonkers, NY 10701
  • Franklin Hospital Medical Center
  • Cayuga Medical Center Ithaca Roswell Park Cancer Institute
  • Orange Regional Medical Center-Middletown Campus
  • Brookhaven Memorial Hospital
  • Palm Bay Hospital
  • Vassar Brothers Hospital
  • South Oaks Hospital
    400 Sunrise Hwy, Amityville, NY 11701
  • Highland Hospital
  • St. Petersburg General Hospital
  • Soldiers And Sailors Memorial Hospital Of Yates County Inc
  • Medical Center
  • Meadowlands Hospital Medical Center
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Dubovsky has contributed to 8 publications.
    Title Retrospective Family Study of Childhood Medulloblastoma.
    Date June 2005
    Journal American Journal of Medical Genetics. Part A
    Excerpt

    Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant central nervous system tumor of childhood and can occur sporadically or in association with inherited cancer susceptibility syndromes such as the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS). To determine whether an association existed between the risk of developing medulloblastoma and undiagnosed syndromes, we retrospectively reviewed clinical data on 33 patients with medulloblastoma from a single institution and compared them with their unaffected relatives (n = 46). Six patients had tumors showing desmoplastic histology. Two of the six met diagnostic criteria for NBCCS. One NBCCS patient had a missense mutation of patched-1 (PTCH1); the other had no identifiable PTCH1 mutation. Two patients with isolated desmoplastic medulloblastoma had an insertion and splice site mutation, respectively, in suppressor of fused (SUFU). All patients with nondesmoplastic medulloblastoma histology received molecular testing for SUFU. None of these patients had an identifiable mutation in PTCH1 or SUFU. We performed a clinical evaluation for Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) in four medulloblastoma families, who exhibited macrocephaly as the only finding consistent with the diagnosis of GCPS. Molecular analysis of GLI3 in these four families was negative. There was a paucity of clinical findings among the majority of medulloblastoma patients in this study group to suggest a definable cancer genetic syndrome. We conclude that clinically recognizable syndromes are uncommon among patients with medulloblastoma, however, PTCH1 and SUFU mutations are present at a low but significant frequency.

    Title Ct Scout Films: Don't Forget to Look!
    Date January 2004
    Journal Pediatric Radiology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: A lateral scout view of the head is always obtained when performing head computed tomography (CT). It is common knowledge that viewing the lateral scout view may provide additional information. For a variety of reasons, however, a careful review may not be performed routinely. OBJECTIVE: To illustrate the value of the lateral scout view, we present a series of representative cases. PATIENTS: Six patients with clinically relevant findings on the scout view. RESULTS: Most of the ancillary findings were in the upper cervical spine/neck, which is typically included on the lateral scout view. CONCLUSION: Careful evaluation of the scout view of the head CT, including the skull and neck, may yield valuable information, which may not be visualized on the axial CT images.

    Title Fetal Mri Evaluation of an Intracranial Mass: in Utero Evolution of Hemorrhage.
    Date October 2002
    Journal Pediatric Radiology
    Excerpt

    The role of MRI in the evaluation of fetal abnormalities is still under evaluation. We describe a case of an intracranial mass that was initially identified by prenatal ultrasound and was further evaluated by MRI. Ultimately, the findings were most consistent with hematoma secondary to an underlying dural malformation with spontaneous involution. The advantages of fetal MRI in the assessment and management of this abnormality will be discussed.

    Title Mr Imaging of the Corpus Callosum in Pediatric Patients with Neurofibromatosis Type 1.
    Date March 2001
    Journal Ajnr. American Journal of Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Many pediatric patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1) have an apparent increased thickness of the corpus callosum (CC) on sagittal T1-weighted images compared with patients not affected by NF-1. In this study, we compared the surface area of the CC in children with NF-1 with that of healthy pediatric control subjects to determine if this was another common intracranial manifestation of NF-1. METHODS: Midsagittal T1-weighted MR images of 43 consecutive children with NF-1 and 43 age- and gender-matched healthy control subjects were reviewed retrospectively. The surface area of the CC and the midsagittal intracranial skull surface (MISS) area were measured five times each on all midsagittal images. A mean CC to mean midline intracranial surface area ratio (CC/MISS) was calculated for each. RESULTS: There is a statistically significant increase in the mean CC surface area in pediatric patients with NF-1 (680 mm2 +/- 98, range 509-974 mm2) compared with control subjects (573 mm2 +/- 83, range 404-797 mm2). The mean MISS is significantly increased in patients with NF-1 (16568 mm2 +/- 1161, range 14107-19394 mm2 vs 15402 mm2 +/- 1133, range 12951-17905 mm2 for control subjects). CC/MISS was also significantly increased in the patients with NF-1 relative to the control subjects (.0410 +/- .0043, range .0330-.0530 vs .0372 +/- .0043, range .0270-.0470 for control subjects). CONCLUSION: A larger midsagittal surface area of the CC is another intracranial manifestation of NF-1 that can be demonstrated by sagittal MR imaging. The etiology is unclear, but could be related to abnormal neurofibromin and Ras protein activity. Potential clinical relevance is discussed herein.

    Title Intracranial Calcifications in Childhood Medulloblastoma: Relation to Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome.
    Date June 2000
    Journal Ajnr. American Journal of Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Medulloblastoma is one of the most common posterior fossa tumors to occur in children. Our purpose was to document the frequency, location, and time of occurrence of intracranial calcifications in cranial CT studies of children with medulloblastoma. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed cranial CT studies of 56 patients diagnosed with medulloblastoma from 1983 through 1997 for the presence of intracranial calcifications. The findings were compared with 159 cranial CT studies of patients who were evaluated in the emergency department (control group). Thirty-two patients with medulloblastoma without shunts were compared with 118 patients from the control group without shunts. Similarly, 24 patients with medulloblastoma with shunts were compared with 41 patients from the control group with shunts. RESULTS: Overall, three (9%) patients with medulloblastoma without shunts, four (16%) patients with medulloblastoma with shunts, and four (10%) patients from the control group with shunts had falx calcification. Only the two children carrying the diagnoses of medulloblastoma and nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, however, had calcification of the falx cerebri shown on the cranial CT scans obtained during the peridiagnostic period. Both were diagnosed with medulloblastoma before the age of 3 years and later developed jaw cysts and multiple basal cell carcinomas in the radiation field. CONCLUSION: Previous studies have shown that falx calcification is a major component of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome. Our two cases illustrate the importance of considering the diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome when falx calcification is present in young patients with medulloblastoma. If the concomitant diagnosis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is made, alternative types of therapy should be sought to minimize radiation therapy sequelae.

    Title Imaging and Clinical Evaluation of Isolated Atresia of the Oval Window.
    Date February 2000
    Journal Ajnr. American Journal of Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Congenital causes of hearing loss in children commonly are encountered, and imaging aids in diagnosis as well as presurgical evaluation. Atresia of the oval window not associated with atresia of the external auditory canal (EAC) is a rare cause of congenital hearing loss in children. We present the clinical and imaging findings in children with isolated oval-window atresia. METHODS: Atresia of the oval window was defined as the absence of the structure with the presence of a bony plate superimposed between the vestibule and middle ear. The bony plate is within the expected region of the oval window. Using a computerized database, nine patients with isolated oval-window atresia were found. All had been evaluated with high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and all had medical records available for review, including audiogram results. Imaging studies were interpreted by the consensus of two pediatric neuroradiologists. RESULTS: Atresia of the oval window was documented in all cases using HRCT criteria. The most common anomalies associated with oval-window atresia were inferomedial malposition of the facial nerve (n = 8), malformed incus (n = 6), and displaced stapes (n = 2). Four patients had symmetric bilateral involvement. Hearing tests were not specific, because conductive, sensorineural, and mixed patterns were found. CONCLUSION: Anomalies of the oval window should be sought in all patients with congenital hearing loss. Associated findings, such as facial nerve aberrancy and ossicular anomalies, are important in both diagnosis and surgical planning.

    Title Stroke After Zoster Ophthalmicus in a 12-year-old Girl with Protein C Deficiency.
    Date November 1999
    Journal Neurology
    Excerpt

    A 12-year-old girl who had zoster ophthalmicus 10 months earlier presented with hemiparesis and corresponding basal ganglionic infarction related to middle cerebral artery branch thrombosis ipsilateral to the zoster. Hematologic evaluation disclosed protein C deficiency. This represents the first zoster-associated stroke reported in childhood associated with protein C deficiency, with extension of the latency period between zoster and infarction, previously reported to be 6 months.

    Title Pediatric Congenital Bilateral Perisylvian Syndrome: Clinical and Mri Features in 12 Patients.
    Date November 1997
    Journal Neuropediatrics
    Excerpt

    In 1926, Foix, Chavany and Marie described an acquired syndrome of fasciopharyngoglossomasticatory diplegia resulting from bilateral infarction of the anterior operculum. Clinical features consisted of facial diplegia, dysarthria, pseudobulbar palsy, mild to severe mental retardation, and seizures. A developmental form, similar in presentation in adults with MRI findings consisting of bilateral perisylvian cortical malformation consistent with polymicrogyria involving the sylvian fissure and opercular cortex, has been recognized; but few pediatric cases of congenital bilateral perisylvian syndrome (CBPS) have been reported. Over the past four years, we have encountered 12 cases of CBPS presenting in childhood. Age ranges were from 1 week to 11 years with a median of 2.25 years; six were less than two years of age. Seven were male and five female. Ten had bilateral perisylvian polymicrogyria on MRI; two had unilateral perisylvian schizencephaly with contralateral perisylvian polymicrogyria. Clinical manifestations included developmental delay in 7; poor palatal function in 5; hypotonia in 4; arthrogryposis in 4; hemiparesis in 3; apnea in 3; paraparesis in 2; micrognathia in 2; pectus excavatum in 2; quadriparesis in 1; and hearing loss in 1. Seizures occurred in seven (58%) and consisted of infantile spasms (n = 1), generalized tonic-clonic (n = 1), complex partial (n = 2), partial motor (n = 2; 1 with secondary generalization), and febrile convulsions (n = 1). CBPS has different manifestations in the pediatric population than in adults. CBPS is more common than previously thought, is recognizable by MRI and should be suspected clinically in any infant or child presenting with oromotor dysfunction/pseudobulbar signs and developmental delay, especially if there are associated congenital malformations. Epilepsy is not a constant feature in the pediatric presentation and is variable in type and severity.


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