Otolaryngologist (ear, nose, throat), Pediatrician
24 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Sterling Heights
11080 Hall Rd
Ste A
Sterling Heights, MI 48314
586-254-7200
Locations and availability (8)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
University of Michigan Medical School (1986)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Otolaryngology
American Academy of Otolaryngology: Head and Neck Surgery
American College of Surgeons

Affiliations ?

Dr. Sargent is affiliated with 15 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Beaumont Hospital,Troy
    Otolaryngology
    44201 Dequindre Rd, Troy, MI 48085
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Providence Hospital and Medical Center
    Otolaryngology
    16001 W 9 Mile Rd, Southfield, MI 48075
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • St. John Hospital & Medical Center
    Otolaryngology
    22101 Moross Rd, Detroit, MI 48236
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe
    Otolaryngology
    468 Cadieux Rd, Grosse Pointe, MI 48230
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • St. John Macomb-Oakland Hospital (Oakland Center)
    27351 Dequindre Rd, Madison Heights, MI 48071
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
    Otolaryngology
    3601 W 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48073
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center
    Otolaryngology
    18101 Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn, MI 48124
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • St John Detroit Riverview Hospital
    7733 E Jefferson Ave, Detroit, MI 48214
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • OAKWOOD HOSPITAL & MEDICAL CENTER DEARBORN
  • Providence Park Hospital
    47601 Grand River Ave, Novi, MI 48374
  • Royal Oak
  • St Louis University Hospital
  • Oakwood Hospital
  • Beaumont Affiliation & Years on StaffRoyal Oak
  • Royal Oak 8 Years
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Sargent has contributed to 21 publications.
    Title Quality-of-life Assessment of Ménière's Disease Patients After Surgical Labyrinthectomy.
    Date February 2007
    Journal Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the impact of surgical labyrinthectomy on quality of life of Ménière's disease patients. STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Otology subspecialty referral center. PATIENTS: All patients with Ménière's disease who underwent surgical labyrinthectomy between 1998 and 2004 were selected. Fifty-three patients satisfied inclusion criteria. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 44 patients. INTERVENTION(S): The Ménière's Disease Outcomes Questionnaire is a disease-specific quality-of-life questionnaire. It was used to assess the quality of life of patients before and after surgical labyrinthectomy. The questionnaire encompasses physical, mental, and social well-being domains of quality of life. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): Change in total quality-of-life score was used to assess the overall impact of surgical labyrinthectomy on subjective patient outcome. Individual quality-of-life domains were also assessed. RESULTS: Forty-three of 44 respondents (98%) had improvement in total score after surgery. The one patient who demonstrated deterioration developed latent contralateral disease. Average preoperative and postoperative scores were 34 +/- 14 and 67 +/- 15, respectively (p < 0.001). All questions showed significant improvement with surgery (p < 0.001) except questions pertaining to memory (no change) and hearing loss (nonsignificant decrease in score). CONCLUSION: This study comprises the first patient-directed assessment of quality-of-life outcomes in Ménière's disease patients after labyrinthectomy. Despite the disadvantage of hearing loss, patients consistently reported significant improvement in all quality-of-life domains and do not report a significant loss of quality of life in terms of their hearing loss. Surgical labyrinthectomy remains a highly effective treatment for Ménière's disease patients.

    Title Success of Posterior Semicircular Canal Occlusion and Application of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory.
    Date April 2006
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the long-term efficacy and patient satisfaction of posterior semicircular canal occlusion (PSCO) as a treatment for intractable benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective analysis of patients with BPPV who underwent PSCO was conducted in a tertiary referral center. Demographic data, clinical records, and audiometric data were reviewed. Dix-Hallpike maneuver, dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), and a specific PSCO questionnaire (PCOQ) were used to measure outcome. RESULTS: Twenty-eight patients underwent PSCO. The mean follow-up time was 40 months. All patients had normalization of the Hallpike test. DHI scores of 20 patients were recorded. The mean preoperative score was 70 compared with postoperative mean of 13 (P < 0.001). Mild hearing loss was found in 1 patient. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: PSCO is highly successful. The DHI scores postoperatively show significant improvement. The PCOQ revealed an overall 85% patient satisfaction rate. PSCO is a safe and effective intervention for intractable BPPV with a high patient satisfaction rate. EBM rating: C-4.

    Title Intracranial Blood Flow Velocities and Co2 Reactivity in Diagnosing Migraine-related Dizziness.
    Date January 2005
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Migraine-related dizziness can present with or without headache, often making diagnosis difficult. Flow velocity and CO 2 reactivity testing using transcranial Doppler (TCD) measurement of intracranial blood flow has been described as abnormal in patients with classic or common migraine. This study sought to determine the utility, if any, of this noninvasive technique in the diagnosis of migraine-related dizziness. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A prospective, controlled study in academic neurotology and neurology practices was conducted. Nine patients with migraine-related dizziness and 10 patients with no history of migraine or dizziness were tested with transcranial Doppler ultrasound in a blinded fashion. RESULTS: No statistically significant differences in intracranial blood flow velocities or in cerebrovascular reactivity to hypocapnia were found between patients and controls. CONCLUSIONS: Assessment of intracranial blood flow velocity and CO 2 reactivity using TCD does not help in the diagnosis of migraine-related dizziness. SIGNIFICANCE: A reliable objective test for the diagnosis of migraine-related dizziness remains elusive, and the diagnosis of this patient group continues to be suboptimal.

    Title The Learning Curve Revisited: Stapedotomy.
    Date April 2002
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the outcome of stapedotomy changes with experience. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective case review of an academic otologic practice of a fellowship-trained otologist that consisted of 50 consecutive patients who underwent primary stapedotomy. The main outcome measures were preoperative and postoperative audiograms for both the operated ear and the opposite ear (control). RESULTS: There were no major complications or loss of hearing among the 50 patients. Minor complications included 1 middle ear infection, 2 torn flaps, and 1 tympanic membrane perforation. One patient had worse conductive hearing loss after surgery. The hearing of 2 patients was unchanged. Hearing for the entire group improved (P > 0.001) from a speech reception threshold of 55 dB (SD, 17 dB) to 30 dB (SD, 19 dB). Complete closure of the air-bone gap was achieved in 20% of the first 10 patients and 30% of the last 10 patients. CONCLUSIONS: The results of stapedotomy improve with experience, although the learning curve seems less steep than has been reported for total or near-total footplate removal. SIGNIFICANCE: Stapedotomy can be successfully performed early in surgical experience, but the learning curve should be acknowledged and discussed with the patient.

    Title The Minimum Speech Test Battery in Profound Unilateral Hearing Loss.
    Date October 2001
    Journal Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Individuals with monaural hearing experience disadvantages compared with normal hearing counterparts because of the loss of the head shadow effect, the squelch effect, and binaural summation. In this study the Minimum Speech Test Battery (MSTB), a battery designed to document word recognition in bilaterally hearing impaired cochlear implant candidates, was administered to unilaterally hearing-impaired and normal hearing subjects to study its possible use in measuring hearing difficulty in monaural subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Repeated measures design with the MSTB administered in sound-field in a sound-isolated booth in 1) quiet; 2) speech toward good ear, noise (+10 dB S/N) toward impaired ear; 3) speech toward impaired ear, noise toward good ear; and 4) bilateral speech and noise. SETTING: Academic otologic practice. PATIENTS: Ten adults with normal hearing and 10 adults with normal or near-normal hearing in one ear and profound hearing loss in the contralateral ear. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The MSTB, composed of the Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant (CNC) test and the Hearing In Noise Test (HINT). RESULTS: As expected, performance differences between the groups were not found in quiet conditions. Analysis of variance and regression analysis confirmed that the impaired group performed significantly worse than control subjects on HINT testing when noise was directed toward the good ear. Analysis of variance and regression analysis confirmed that the impaired group performed significantly worse than control subjects on CNC testing when noise was directed toward the good ear and in bilateral noise. CONCLUSIONS: The MSTB may be useful in measuring the hearing difficulty of patients with monaural hearing.

    Title Mastoid Oscillation in Canalith Repositioning for Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo.
    Date August 2001
    Journal Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The canalith repositioning procedure (CRP) was developed to treat paroxysmal positional vertigo (PPV). Successful CRP results in cessation of PPV and positional nystagmus. Mastoid oscillation (MO) has been advocated to enhance the efficacy of CRP. The authors sought to objectively determine the effect of MO on CRP. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. SETTING: Ambulatory referral center. PATIENTS: Patients with PPV seen from 1993 through 1999 (N = 168). INTERVENTIONS: Canalith repositioning procedure performed without MO (n = 104) and performed with MO (n = 64). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Presence or absence of nystagmus on Dix-Hallpike testing 6 weeks after CRP. RESULTS: Eighty-four percent of patients treated with MO had resolution, and 16% had persistent nystagmus. Seventy-three percent of patients without MO had resolution, and 27% had persistent nystagmus. Although suggesting a trend, the difference did not reach the level of significance (p = 0.151). CONCLUSIONS: Mastoid oscillation does not significantly enhance the efficacy of the CRP.

    Title Cochlear Implantation in Sudden Bilateral Sensorineural Hearing Loss.
    Date June 1998
    Journal Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
    Excerpt

    Although 1-4% of all cases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) are bilateral, all such patients reported to date have experienced significant recovery of hearing in at least one ear. We report a case of profound, bilateral idiopathic SSHL without recovery which was treated with cochlear implantation; the first such report to our knowledge. The patient achieved open-set spondee recognition. Individuals with sudden bilateral hearing loss in whom treatable causes have been eliminated may benefit from cochlear implantation.

    Title Measurement of Facial Movement with Computer Software.
    Date April 1998
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To adapt desktop computer software to objectively grade facial movement. DESIGN: The criteria of the facial nerve grading system by House and Brackmann, the current "gold standard," are prone to ambiguous interpretation. Proposed objective grading systems compare the movement of points on each side of the face or use subtraction and thresholding of digitized images of the face to yield images that represent moving areas of the face. The movement of a point on the face and the area of motion determined by digital subtraction were compared during an increasing smile in healthy subjects. The Nottingham system (calculated using measurement of the movement of 4 points on the face) using desktop computer software (Adobe Photoshop 3.0, Adobe Systems Inc, Mountain View, Calif) to measure movement of the points was compared with the system by House and Brackmann. The computer software was used to subtract digitized images and derive a facial movement score, which was compared with the scores of the systems by Nottingham and House and Brackmann. SETTING: Academic otologic practice. STUDY PARTICIPANTS: Nine patients with varying degrees of facial nerve disability and 7 individuals with normal facial nerve function. RESULTS: The movement of the oral commissure compared with the apparent area of movement of the face determined by digital subtraction had high intersubject variability. In patients with facial weakness, the Nottingham score had a correlation coefficient of -0.97 compared with the House and Brackmann grade, and the digital subtraction score had a correlation coefficient of -0.62 (paired Student t test). CONCLUSIONS: The desktop computer software can be used to calculate the Nottingham score. Digital subtraction as a measure of facial function warrants further study.

    Title Sudden Sensorineural Hearing Loss Following Nonotologic, Noncardiopulmonary Bypass Surgery.
    Date October 1997
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To report 3 cases of sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) following nonotologic surgery in which cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) surgery was not involved and to review reports in the literature of similar cases. DATA SOURCES: Clinical records and MEDLINE and Healthstar databases. STUDY SELECTION: Reports in the world literature of cases of SSHL following nonotologic, non-CPB surgery. DATA SYNTHESIS: While said to be more common after CPB surgery, fewer than 20 cases of SSHL following non-otologic, non-CPB surgery have been reported. A number of proposed causes of SSHL temporally related to non-otologic, non-CPB surgery have been theorized; however, the true cause is unknown. This report presents 3 cases of SSHL following nonotologic, non-CPB surgery. Two patients had profound unilateral loss; 1 had moderate bilateral loss. None of the patients demonstrated recovery despite diuretic and prednisone therapy; in approximately 30% of the cases reported to date, the patients experienced significant improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss following nonotologic, non-CPB surgery is rare, and its cause remains unknown. The scarcity of reports of SSHL following nonotologic, non-CPB surgery raises the possibility that the apparent association may be spurious.

    Title Middle Cranial Fossa Surgery with Image-guided Instrumentation.
    Date August 1997
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Title Idiopathic Bilateral Vestibular Loss.
    Date April 1997
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    We describe the clinical and laboratory features of 13 patients with bilateral loss of peripheral vestibular sensitivity of no known cause. In the office, screening for this condition was possible using illegible e-testing and examination of the patient for refixation saccades after brisk head movements while attempting visual fixation. Diagnosis was confirmed by bilaterally reduced caloric responses (< 20 degrees/second on all 4 caloric irrigations) and abnormally low gain of the vestibulo-ocular reflex on rotational chair testing. The mean age of the patients was 68 years. We noted two patterns of symptom onset: onset associated with vertigo (10 patients) and insidious progressive disequilibrium not associated with vertigo (3 patients). Only 38% of the patients complained of subjective oscillopsia. The subjects performed poorly on platform posturography, particularly when deprived of visual and somatosensory feedback. When associated with vertigo, bilateral vestibular loss may be the result of bilateral sequential vestibular neuritis; when not associated with vertigo, disequilibrium may be caused by slow, symmetrical loss of peripheral function as a result of aging. Although the subjects in this report were elderly, idiopathic bilateral vestibular loss has been reported in patients of all ages.

    Title Imaging Quiz Case 2. Bilateral Osteomas of the Petrous Temporal Bones.
    Date August 1996
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Title Meatal Facial Nerve Decompression in Acoustic Neuroma Resection.
    Date March 1996
    Journal The American Journal of Otology
    Excerpt

    Delayed facial palsy occurs after approximately 15% of acoustic neuroma resections. Whereas in most cases facial nerve function recovers satisfactorily, in about 12% of cases delayed facial palsy may have a poor functional recovery. The fate of facial nerve function was studied in 55 consecutive translabyrinthine acoustic neuroma resections, 23 of whom underwent meatal facial nerve decompression (MFND) at the time of tumor resection. The facial nerve results also were reviewed in 19 middle cranial fossa resections, of whom 14 underwent MFND. There was a bimodal distribution of the delayed palsies, with one group having the onset of palsy within hours to 2 days after surgery and the second group having onset of palsy up to 17 days after surgery. The poorest recoveries were seen in the first group. Although the effect was not statistically significant due to the small sample size, the chance of facial weakness in patients who underwent MFND after translabyrinthine surgery was about 40% less than in those who did not undergo decompression. The apparent protective effect of MFND was increased when the confounding factors of tumor size and degree of resection were taken into account, although the effect was not statistically significant. The duration of palsy was shorter and ultimate recovery better among the patients who underwent facial nerve decompression than in those who did not. Of the translabyrinthine patients who underwent MFND, 100% had House-Brackmann grade I-II function at 2 years, whereas 87% of patients who did not have MFND had grade I-II function and 13% had grade III-IV function. Without MFND, 57% of translabyrinthine patients whose onset of facial palsy was within 2 days of surgery had grade III-IV facial nerve function.

    Title Facial Nerve Monitoring.
    Date October 1995
    Journal The Laryngoscope
    Title Posterior Semicircular Canal Occlusion for Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo--co2 Laser-assisted Technique: Preliminary Results.
    Date April 1995
    Journal The Laryngoscope
    Excerpt

    Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common vestibular end-organ disorder that in the majority of patients resolves with conservative management. In the occasional patient who has unremitting BPPV despite conservative treatment, posterior semicircular canal occlusion (PCO) may be effective in eliminating symptoms. In an attempt to minimize the risk of hearing loss, a modified procedure was developed that uses the CO2 laser to shrink the membranous vestibular posterior semicircular canal prior to mechanically plugging the canal. Preliminary results of this CO2 laser-assisted occlusion technique used in four patients are presented.

    Title The Primate Vestibulo-ocular Reflex During Combined Linear and Angular Head Motion.
    Date February 1992
    Journal Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
    Excerpt

    The squirrel monkey vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) was studied in darkness during Earth-horizontal rotation over a frequency range, 0.01-4 Hz, with the head positioned both centrally and displaced radially relative to the axis of rotation. With the head centered, the canal-mediated angular VOR (AVOR) was recorded in isolation. However, with the head placed eccentrically, otolith-mediated linear VOR (LVOR) components interact with the AVOR to yield a combined AVOR-LVOR response. The plane of the ocular response could be manipulated by placing the head in different orientations relative to gravity (i.e. upright or nose-up). When the head was upright and centered, the horizontal AVOR was recorded. Comparisons between eye and head angular velocity showed that gain (pk eye/pk head velocity) was nearly flat, averaging 0.83, across the frequency range. Phase (difference in degrees between eye and head velocity, shifted 180 degrees by convention) was near 0 degrees, except at frequencies below 0.1 Hz where phase leads were seen. When the head was displaced eccentrically and in the nose-out position (facing away from the axis of rotation), gain rose above that of the AVOR alone. The enhancement was progressive with increasing frequency, but only for frequencies above 0.25 Hz. When the subject was turned nose-in, gain declined relative to the AVOR alone, and in a similar frequency-dependent fashion. These results are consistent with the notion that nose-out and nose-in responses to eccentric rotation represent a combined influence of the horizontal AVOR and LVOR, the latter driven by inter-aural tangential acceleration. To further evaluate this possibility, eccentric rotation was also used to assess the LVOR in isolation. With the head in the nose-up orientation, the AVOR was shifted into the head's roll plane and generated torsional ocular responses. With the head centered over the axis of rotation, no systematic horizontal responses were observed. However, when the head was displaced eccentrically and placed in the head-out and head-in positions, horizontal ocular responses were recorded which were proportional to head eccentricity and were of appropriate polarity to presume that they represented the inter-aural LVOR activated by inter-aural tangential acceleration. Response gain rose with increasing frequency, as did tangential acceleration. The LVOR in its resting state in darkness could be characterized by an average sensitivity of 40.3 degrees/s/g (g = 9.81 m/s2).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

    Title Visually-induced Adaptive Plasticity in the Human Vestibulo-ocular Reflex.
    Date August 1991
    Journal Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
    Excerpt

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) is under adaptive control which corrects VOR performance when visual-vestibular mismatch arises during head movements. However, the dynamic characteristics of VOR adaptive plasticity remain controversial. In this study, eye movements (coil technique) were recorded from normal human subjects during sinusoidal rotations in darkness before and after 8 h. of adaptation to 2X binocular lenses. The VOR was studied at 7 frequencies between 0.025 and 4.0 Hz at 50 degrees/s peak head velocity (less for 2.5-4 Hz). For 0.025 and 0.25 Hz, the VOR was tested at 4 peak head velocities between 50 and 300 degrees/s. Before 2X lens adaptation, VOR gain was around 0.9 at 2.5-4.0 Hz and dropped gradually with decreasing frequency to under 0.6 at 0.025 Hz. Phase showed a small lead at the highest frequencies which declined to 0 degree as frequency decreased to 0.5-0.25 Hz, but then rose to 14 degrees by 0.025 Hz. VOR gain was independent of head velocity in the range 50-300 degrees/s at both 0.025 and 0.25 Hz. However, Phase lead rose with increasing head velocity, more so at 0.025 than at 0.25 Hz. After 2X lens adaptation, gain rose across the frequency bandwidth. However, the proportional gain enhancement was frequency dependent; it was greatest at 0.025 Hz (44%), and declined with increasing frequency to reach a minimum at 4 Hz (19%). Phase lead increased after 2X lens adaptation at lower frequencies, but decreased at higher frequencies. New velocity-dependent gain nonlinearities also developed which were not present prior to adaptation; gain declined as peak head velocity increased from 50 to 300 degrees/s at both 0.025 (23% drop) and 0.25 Hz (15% drop). This may suggest an amplitude-dependent limitation in VOR adaptive plasticity. Results indicate both frequency and amplitude dependent nonlinearities in human VOR response dynamics before and after adaptive gain recalibration.

    Title Selection of Monoclonal Antibody to Hcg Which Localizes in Human Choriocarcinoma Growing in the Syrian Hamster Cheek Pouch.
    Date October 1984
    Journal Hybridoma
    Excerpt

    Six different monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) were evaluated for radioimmunodetection in Golden Syrian Hamsters bearing a human choriocarcinoma in the cheek pouch (188-516 mIU of hCG/g). The affinity of three antibodies when determined were high and five of the antibodies were of IgG1 subclass. After i.v. injection of Staphylococcus Protein A (SPA) affinity purified radioiodinated antibodies, tissue distribution studies demonstrated that antibody 061 had higher target-to-nontarget ratios than the other five antibodies. The mean tumor:muscle ratio of 131I-MAb 061 was 27.5 in four animals, where the mean tumor:muscle ratio of four animals injected with 131I-labeled control monoclonal IgG1 Kappa from MOPC-21 murine myeloma (MOPC-21) was only 2.2. Sharp images of the cheek pouch tumor were obtained at five days following a tracer dose of 131I-061 MAb, but not with the same dose of a 131I-MOPC-21.

    Title Giant Intradiploic Epidermoid Cyst of Greater Sphenoid Wing Causing Unilateral Proptosis and Optic Nerve Compression.
    Date
    Journal Skull Base Surgery
    Excerpt

    Epidermoids are cystic tumors that arise from aberrant epidermal cells. Intradiploic epidermoids are relatively rare tumors that occur in all bones of the calvarium, temporal and sphenoid bones, paranasal sinuses, and maxilla. We report the case of an intradiploic epidermoid of the sphenoid wing causing severe proptosis and visual loss. Theories of embryogenesis and pathophysiology are discussed.

    Title Carcinoma Metastatic to Both Cerebellopontine Angles Masquerading As Acoustic Neuromas.
    Date
    Journal Skull Base Surgery
    Excerpt

    Metastases to the cerebellopontine angles (CPAs) are rare. Typically, the clinical course is one of rapid onset and progression of crarial nerve deficits. The clinical presentation and course of carcinoma metastatic to the CPAs are reviewed. We report a case of bilateral CPA metastases with a radiographic appearance similar to neurofibromatosis type 2 presenting with rapidly progressive bilateral hearing loss followed by unilateral facial nerve palsy.

    Title Tumors and Pseudotumors of the Endolymphatic Sac.
    Date
    Journal Skull Base : Official Journal of North American Skull Base Society ... [et Al.]
    Excerpt

    This article reports on the presentation, diagnosis, management, and treatment outcomes of lesions of the endolymphatic sac in patients treated at a tertiary neurotology referral center. It summarizes survival results in the largest series groups and presents a new diagnostic entity of pseudotumor of the endolymphatic sac. The study includes retrospective review of all patients diagnosed with lesions of the endolymphatic sac within our practice between 1994 and 2005 as well as review of the literature. The primary outcome measure was survival, and the secondary outcome measure was disease-free survival following definitive resection. Postoperative complications were assessed. Survival characteristics of the largest reported case series groups were reviewed. Five cases of endolymphatic sac lesions were identified. Of these, three were true endolymphatic sac tumors and two were inflammatory pseudotumors of the endolymphatic sac. All three of the endolymphatic sac tumors patients survived (100%), and two of the three had disease-free survival (67%). Two of three patients maintained persistent facial paresis postoperatively. Both patients with benign pseudotumors survived (100%). Our study concluded that endolymphatic sac tumors are rare neoplasms of the temporal bone that, although locally aggressive and invasive, have excellent prognosis for survival with complete resection. We report a new entity of pseudotumor of the endolymphatic sac that mimics true sac tumors in every respect on presentation but which is non-neoplastic in origin.


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