Browse Health
Ophthalmic Plastic & Reconstructive Surgery
32 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score
Wayne State University (1978)
  • Currently 1 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Best Doctors in America, Hour Detroit Magazine's Top Docs (2010)
Best Doctors in America, Detroit Hour Magazine's Top Docs (2010)
Patients' Choice Award (2012 - 2014)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2012 - 2013)
Top 10 Doctor - State (2014)
Michigan
Ophthalmologist
On-Time Doctor Award (2009, 2014)
Best Doctors in American *
Hour Detroit Magazine's Top Docs *
Appointments
Wm. Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak (2001 - Present)
Co-Director Oculoplastic Surgery
Oakland University, Wm. Beaumont Hospital (2010 - Present)
Professor of Ophthalmology
Wayne State University, Dept. of Ophthalmology (2003 - Present)
Assistant Clinical Professor
Associations
American Academy of Cosmetic Surgery
American Academy of Ophthalmology
American Board of Ophthalmology
American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Affiliations ?

Dr. Gladstone is affiliated with 13 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
    3601 W 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48073
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Genesys Health System
    1 Genesys Pkwy, Grand Blanc, MI 48439
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • St. Joseph Mercy Oakland
    44405 Woodward Ave, Pontiac, MI 48341
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital,Troy
    44201 Dequindre Rd, Troy, MI 48085
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • St. John Hospital & Medical Center
    22101 Moross Rd, Detroit, MI 48236
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe
    468 Cadieux Rd, Grosse Pointe, MI 48230
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Harper University Hospital
    3990 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • St John Detroit Riverview Hospital
    7733 E Jefferson Ave, Detroit, MI 48214
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Detroit Receiving Hospital & University Health Center
    4201 Saint Antoine St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Saint Joseph Mercy Hospital
    505 E Huron St, Ann Arbor, MI 48104
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Mercy Memorial Hospital System
    718 N Macomb St, Monroe, MI 48162
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Genesys Regional Medical Center
  • Beaumont Affiliation & Years on StaffRoyal Oak
  • * This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

    Publications & Research

    Dr. Gladstone has contributed to 18 publications.
    Title Endoscopic Lacrimal Surgery.
    Date January 2006
    Journal Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
    Title Fundamentals of Facelift Surgery.
    Date August 2005
    Journal Ophthalmology Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    A multitude of techniques exists for facelift surgery (rhytidectomy). These techniques range from simple skin undermining to complex procedures involving superficial musculoaponeurotic system (SMAS) manipulation and subperiosteal dissection. Most surgeons agree that some type of modification of the SMAS is necessary to achieve an acceptable result. The technique presented herein involves developing a relatively large skin flap, tightening the SMAS, and redraping the skin.

    Title Eyelid Sensation After Supratarsal Lid Crease Incision.
    Date September 2002
    Journal Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: To determine the severity and duration of the loss of eyelid sensation after upper eyelid crease incision. METHODS: This clinic-based case study was performed by analyzing observational measurements of patients undergoing upper blepharoplasty or ptosis surgery. Eighty-three eyelids of 50 patients were studied. A Cochet-Bonnet filament-type aesthesiometer was used to obtain all measurements. Preoperative and postoperative measurements were recorded at 1 week, 1 month, and final (2-6 months) time periods. Statistical analysis evaluated the degree and duration of the sensory loss and the extent of recovery during the evaluation period. Recovery of sensation was defined as a numerical reading within one point of baseline. RESULTS: The mean aesthesiometry reading was calculated at the preoperative (3.45), 1-week (1.20), 1-month (1.56), and final postoperative (2.56) periods. Paired t testing showed a decreased but significant difference in sensation measurement at each comparison. Recovery of sensation to within one point occurs at the preoperative to late time period comparison. All but 4 of the 68 eyelids tested at the 1-week postoperative time period had a measured loss of sensation. Of the 44 eyelids tested at the final time period, all but 1 had regained some or all of this sensory loss. CONCLUSIONS: Loss of skin sensation in the eyelid after upper eyelid crease incision blepharoplasty or blepharoptosis repair occurs in most patients and should be considered an expected outcome of the procedure. Partial to complete recovery of eyelid sensation over 2 to 6 months should also be expected, though in rare instances this does not occur.

    Title Ophthalmologic Aspects of Thyroid-related Orbitopathy.
    Date May 1998
    Journal Endocrinology and Metabolism Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    This article explores many of the ophthalmologic aspects of thyroid-related orbitopathy. The eight main areas of clinical concern--ocular comfort, optic nerve function, exophthalmos, eyelid position, diplopia, cosmesis, soft-tissue signs, and psychologic factors--are discussed so that practitioners may be more secure in dealing with these areas and in helping patients to be more comfortable both physically and psychologically.

    Title Management of Paralytic Lagophthalmos with a Modified Gold-weight Implantation Technique.
    Date July 1996
    Journal Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    A modified gold-weight implantation technique was used to treat paralytic lagophthalmos in 15 patients. Three patients had suffered extrusions of previously placed gold-weight implants, two had other complications necessitating reoperation, and 10 had no previous surgery. The surgical modifications were intended to reduce the incidence of implant extrusion, postoperative ptosis, and implant visibility beneath the skin. The important changes in the surgical technique included (a) advancing the levator aponeurosis over the implant and (b) adjusting the final eyelid height intraoperatively with levator myotomies. Follow-up ranged from 6 to 11 months. None of the patients in this study had postoperative problems associated with ptosis, implant extrusion, or implant visibility. Mild, prolonged, postoperative edema was noted in several patients. This resolved spontaneously. Mild eyelid retraction and lagophthalmos were seen postoperatively in two patients. This was caused by a failure to perform marginal myotomies at the time of the initial surgeries.

    Title Adult Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction.
    Date June 1994
    Journal The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
    Excerpt

    Tear production resulting from obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct is a common ophthalmic problem. The diagnosis and treatment of this condition require a thorough understanding of the lacrimal apparatus and its ocular and nasal relationships. Idiopathic or primary acquired nasolacrimal duct obstruction is a syndrome of unknown etiology. Of all nontraumatic forms, it accounts for the vast majority of cases found in adults. The authors discuss a number of potential causes, some of them iatrogenic and discuss the technique of dacryocystorhinostomy, the standard surgical treatment, in detail.

    Title Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lacrimal Sac.
    Date January 1994
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the lacrimal sac is rare. We report a case of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman with a squamous cell carcinoma of the right lacrimal sac, initially presenting at an early stage. A critical review of the literature is also presented with specific regard to operative and postoperative management. Treatment of these lesions is predominantly surgical. The role of radiation therapy is not yet fully defined. Successful management requires a high index of suspicion as well as aggressive and early intervention.

    Title Periorbital and Orbital Infections in Children.
    Date April 1992
    Journal The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
    Excerpt

    Bacterial infections of the periorbital and orbital tissues range in severity from minor to life-threatening. Preseptal (periorbital) cellulitis is more common than orbital cellulitis and occurs quite frequently in children. A history of antecedent trauma or upper respiratory tract infection is present in more than half of all cases. Evaluation by computed tomography scans is an indispensable part of the diagnostic procedure. All cultures should be obtained before institution of antibiotic therapy. Initial therapy should begin with administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics with adjustments made in response to positive culture results. Response to antibiotics is usually prompt and the incidence of complications is low. If clinical improvement is slow, surgery should be performed early in the course of the disease to minimize the potential for significant complications such as cavernous sinus thrombosis.

    Title A New Light Device for the Illumination of the Hertel-type Exophthalmometer.
    Date July 1987
    Journal American Journal of Ophthalmology
    Title A New Clamp for Cicatricial Entropion Surgery.
    Date November 1986
    Journal American Journal of Ophthalmology
    Title A Modified Glass Tube for Conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy.
    Date September 1985
    Journal Archives of Ophthalmology
    Excerpt

    The standard glass tube used with a conjunctivodacryocystorhinostomy is subject to spontaneous displacement. Either internal displacement into the surgically created passageway or external displacement and loss are possible. We have modified the tube by adding a flange 4 to 6 mm from the tube's top. This anchors the tube and significantly reduces postoperative tube mobility. Many procedures that would otherwise fail can be salvaged by using this new tube.

    Title Internal Vertical Shortening for the Correction of Diffuse or Segmental Postoperative Blepharoptosis.
    Date May 1985
    Journal American Journal of Ophthalmology
    Excerpt

    In a series of 18 patients operated on because of postoperative eyelid contour abnormalities or small to moderate amounts of diffuse blepharoptosis, a technique of internal vertical shortening produced consistently reliable results. A cosmetically acceptable result was achieved in 17 of 18 patients (95%); only one of 18 (5%) showed no improvement. In cases of overcorrected upper eyelid retraction secondary to thyroid ophthalmopathy, 11 of 11 patients had cosmetically acceptable results. In those with blepharoptosis or eyelid contour abnormalities secondary to other causes, six of seven patients (84%) had cosmetically acceptable results. In our technique of internal vertical shortening, a predetermined amount of conjunctiva and overlying scar tissue or levator aponeurosis is removed. The resection uses a posterior approach to remove tissue from the superior tarsal border upward.

    Title A Repetitive Forced Closure Test.
    Date April 1985
    Journal Archives of Ophthalmology
    Title Co2 Laser Excision of Xanthelasma Lesions.
    Date April 1985
    Journal Archives of Ophthalmology
    Excerpt

    Xanthelasma of the eyelids traditionally has been treated by excision, followed by suturing of the defect. A new technique of ablating these lesions using a superpulsed CO2 laser was used to treat a series of nine patients with xanthelasma. Advantages of this technique include: (1) superb hemostasis intraoperatively; (2) magnified view of tissue removal, enhancing complete excision; (3) the absence of suturing; (4) the avoidance of reconstructive procedures; and (5) a high degree of patient satisfaction, with minimal or no postoperative pain.

    Title Determination of the Normal Range of Exophthalmometric Values for Black and White Adults.
    Date November 1984
    Journal American Journal of Ophthalmology
    Excerpt

    We used the Hertel exophthalmometer to measure the degree of protrusion in 681 adults, ranging in age from 18 to 91 years. The 327 white and 354 black subjects had no history of orbital or endocrine disease, severe myopia (more than -7 diopters), or buphthalmos. The mean normal protrusion values were 16.5 mm in white men, 18.5 mm in black men, 15.4 mm in white women, and 17.8 mm in black women. Although protrusion values above 21 mm are usually considered abnormal, we found that the upper limits of normal were 21.7 mm for white men, 24.7 mm for black men, 20.1 mm for white women, and 23.0 mm for black women. These differences were statistically significant (P less than .025). No individual had more than 2 mm of asymmetry between eyes.

    Title Argon Laser Treatment of an Eyelid Margin Capillary Hemangioma.
    Date February 1984
    Journal Ophthalmic Surgery
    Excerpt

    When capillary hemangiomas do not resolve spontaneously, treatment may be indicated. Various forms of therapy have been employed. These include excisional surgery, cryotherapy, sclerosing solutions, embolization, external beam irradiation, steroids, and the argon laser. We report the use of a standard ophthalmic argon laser combined with curettage on a noninvoluting eyelid margin hemangioma found on a 29-year-old man. Details of the surgical technique are provided and postoperative results documented. We believe this to be the first case of a lid margin hemangioma successfully treated in this manner. The technique offers these advantages: (1) Selective absorption of the laser energy by the blood-filled tissue allows microablation of the lesion under ideal hemostatic conditions with minimal loss of normal lid tissue. (2) Oculoplastic lid repair is obviated since minimal normal tissue is removed. (3) The procedure can be performed under local anesthesia on an outpatient basis.

    Title The Afferent Pupillary Defect As an Early Manifestation of Occult Temporal Arteritis.
    Date February 1983
    Journal Annals of Ophthalmology
    Excerpt

    A 76-year-old man had excellent visual acuity and an afferent pupillary defect (Marcus-Gunn pupil) on one side. After several weeks of investigation, a diagnosis of biopsy-proved temporal arteritis was made. I believe that this is the first case of "occult" temporal arteritis with essentially normal vision and with an afferent pupillary defect as the sole original manifestation of the disease.

    Title Solar Retinitis After Minimal Exposure.
    Date September 1978
    Journal Archives of Ophthalmology
    Excerpt

    Solar retinitis after prolonged or purposeful exposure to the sun has been reported many times. In this study, three patients were seen with the clinical diagnosis of solar retinitis but without an initial compatible history. Previously, such persons have frequently been categorized as having foveomacular retinitis. In this study, careful follow-up history was obtained in an attempt to find an origin for the condition of the patients. Evidence for very brief, high-intensity, and long-term low-intensity exposure to the sun's radiant energy was substantiated. Theoretical consideration was made of the mechanisms by which this type of exposure produced retinal damage.

    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Clifford Cox

    Ophthalmology
    40 years experience
    Flint, MI

    Dr. Athear Alrawi

    Ophthalmology
    13 years experience
    Flint, MI

    Dr. Robert Zendler

    Ophthalmology
    26 years experience
    Flint, MI

    Dr. Steven Boskovich

    Ophthalmology
    23 years experience
    Flint, MI

    Dr. Gary Keoleian

    Ophthalmology
    24 years experience
    Flint, MI

    Dr. David Diskin

    Ophthalmology
    23 years experience
    Flint, MI
    Search All Similar Doctors