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Credentials

Education ?

Medical School Score
The University of Texas at Galveston (1981)
  •  
Residency
Mayo Clinic Rochester - Rochester Methodist (1986) *
* This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2013)

Affiliations ?

Dr. Brindley is affiliated with 10 hospitals.

Hospital Affiliations

Score

Rankings

  • Covenant Medical Center
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    3615 19th St, Lubbock, TX 79410
    •  
    Top 50%
  • University Medical Center - Lubbock
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    602 Indiana Ave, Lubbock, TX 79415
    •  
  • Covenant Hospital Levelland
    1900 College Ave, Levelland, TX 79336
    •  
  • Covenant Children's Hospital
    3610 21st St, Lubbock, TX 79410
    •  
  • Covenant Hospital Plainview
    Orthopaedic Surgery
    2601 Dimmitt Rd, Plainview, TX 79072
    •  
  • Lincoln County Medical Center
  • TX Tech Physicians Associates
  • Scott And White Memorial
  • University Medical Center
  • Covenant Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Brindley has contributed to 12 publications.
    Title Influence of a Platelet Concentrate on Prosthetic Bone Ingrowth in a Rabbit Model.
    Date February 2008
    Journal Journal of Surgical Orthopaedic Advances
    Excerpt

    Recent studies have shown that an increase in bone ingrowth by addition of osteogenic growth factors can reduce micro motion and gross implant motion and contribute to joint implant stability through osseointegration. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has the potential to provide growth factors that may be conducive to osteointegration at the bone-implant interface. This study analyzed the influence of PRP on bone ingrowth upon a beaded metal implant in distal femurs of 22 rabbits. Rabbit limbs were randomly assigned to receive an implant plus PRP or plain implant. Half of the specimens were randomly assigned to a 2-week group (n = 20) or a 5-week group (n = 20). Histologic and histomorphometric comparison between implant alone and implant plus PRP, at 2 and 5 weeks, was performed. In both the 2- and 5-week comparisons, there was no statistical difference (p > .05) in bone ingrowth between the control and PRP group, despite a slight increase in trabecular bone growth in PRP groups. This study suggests that PRP is not a major contributing factor to bone ingrowth at the bone-implant interface. This supports growing evidence in the literature that PRP can lead to variable bone growth stimulation in vivo.

    Title Osteochondral Autograft Transplantation in the Porcine Knee.
    Date October 2006
    Journal The American Journal of Sports Medicine
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Knee articular cartilage defects are not an uncommon problem. Because articular cartilage is limited in its ability to heal, these defects are difficult to manage. HYPOTHESIS: Osteochondral autografts will provide less of a cavitary defect and more viable hyaline articular cartilage than will control knees. STUDY DESIGN: Controlled laboratory study. METHODS: Osteochondral autografts were grossly and microscopically evaluated in the porcine knee and compared with a control at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. In 18 porcine specimens, a 1-stage surgical procedure was performed to harvest an osteochondral graft from a nonweightbearing articular cartilage surface, and the graft was transplanted into a defect created in the weight-bearing region of the medial femoral condyle. In the opposite control knee, a similar defect was created in the medial femoral condyle; an osteochondral transplant was not performed. Six pigs each were sacrificed at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. RESULTS: Gross inspection of the control knees showed a cavitary defect. The defect grossly decreased in size with fibrous ingrowth seen on microscopic analysis. An increasing amount of fibrous tissue and fibrocartilage was present at the 3 time periods. Gross inspection of the graft knee showed a healed osteochondral plug with no obvious displacement, cavitary defects, or surrounding necrotic tissue at each time interval. Microscopic analysis revealed the graft knee contained viable hyaline cartilage and healed viable subchondral bone. At all time intervals, 75% to 100% of the hyaline cartilage was viable in all specimens. In 6-month specimens, bridging cartilage at the autograft-host junction was incomplete in 50%, partial in 33%, and complete in 17%. CONCLUSION: Osteochondral autografts in the porcine knee resulted in viable hyaline cartilage for up to 6 months; there was inconsistent bridging hyaline cartilage at the periphery. Grafts appeared to heal into existing subchondral bone without displacement or evidence of necrosis. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: This type of osteochondral transplant can be used as a reliable reconstructive alternative for osteochondral defects.

    Title Case Reports: Malignant Transformation of Aneurysmal Bone Cysts.
    Date November 2005
    Journal Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
    Excerpt

    An aneurysmal bone cyst is an uncommon benign primary bone tumor. Careful intralesional curettage through a wide cortical window in addition to cauterization with or without adjuvant therapy (phenol or hydrogen peroxide) and bone grafting or cementation is the preferred surgical treatment. Adjuvant or primary radiation of an aneurysmal bone cyst rarely is used because of its association with malignant transformation of the lesion. Several cases of late malignant transformation of primary aneurysmal bone cysts without adjuvant radiation have been reported. We provide additional documentation of two primary aneurysmal bone cysts treated surgically with careful intralesional curettage through a wide cortical window and allograft bone grafting without adjuvant radiation. At 5.5 years and 12 years after treatment, a telangiectatic osteosarcoma and a fibroblastic osteosarcoma, respectively, were identified in the site of the original lesions. Not only should aneurysmal bone cysts be evaluated carefully through histologic examination at presentation, patients also should be counseled regarding possible recurrence and the need for routine followups, especially if symptoms change.

    Title Knee Manipulation After Total Knee Arthroplasty.
    Date October 1999
    Journal Journal of the Southern Orthopaedic Association
    Excerpt

    To determine if any factors are associated with knee stiffness after total knee arthroplasty (TKA), we retrospectively reviewed the medical records and radiographs of patients who had knee manipulation after total knee replacement at Scott & White Memorial Hospital from 1983 to 1993. Twenty-five patients who had knee manipulation after TKA were matched by surgeon, year of surgery, and age (+/- 5 years) with a study group of 25 patients who did not have knee manipulation after TKA. Patients in the manipulated group had decreased flexion at the time of discharge from the hospital after the knee arthroplasty and a decreased final flexion. The age of the patient, time from surgery to manipulation, and preoperative flexion did not correlate with final flexion attained in the manipulated group. Relative to the control study group, the manipulated group had an increase in postoperative anteroposterior femoral thickness. A decrease in patellar height was noted both in the manipulated group and in the control nonmanipulated group. There was no significant difference between groups for a change in patellar height.

    Title Cementless Revision of Total Hip Arthroplasty Using Proximal Porous-coated Femoral Implants.
    Date March 1999
    Journal Journal of the Southern Orthopaedic Association
    Excerpt

    Thirty patients had 32 cementless total hip arthroplasty revisions and were evaluated postoperatively for clinical function (Harris Hip Score) and radiographic evidence of implant stability. Of the 26 femoral components revised, 16 were revised with anatomic long-stem femoral prostheses, and 10 were revised with straight mid-stem-length components. All components were collared and had circumferential proximal fiber-mesh porous coating. Seven of 16 patients had radiographic subsidence after revision with long-stem components (2 to 30 mm); 6 of 10 patients had subsidence after revision with mid-stem femoral components (2 to 25 mm). Of the 13 patients with femoral subsidence, 8 had calcar reconstruction with allograft bone; of the 13 patients without radiographic subsidence, 8 did not require calcar reconstruction. One of 27 fiber-mesh, porous-coated acetabular components migrated (30 mm). No components have been removed or revised. Even with circumferential proximal porous coating, femoral implant stability remains unpredictable in total hip arthroplasty revision.

    Title Synovial Sarcoma Presenting As an Acute Compartment Syndrome.
    Date September 1995
    Journal The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
    Title Hemophilia Presenting As Compartment Syndrome in the Arm Following Venipuncture. A Case Report and Review of the Literature.
    Date August 1989
    Journal Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
    Excerpt

    A three-month-old male infant with undiagnosed hemophilia presented with fever and irritability. During the diagnostic evaluation a venipuncture in the right antecubital fossa led to hemorrhage and a compartment syndrome in the brachium. Differential diagnosis included osteomyelitis and septic arthritis but a 99technetium bone scan revealed only delayed washout of radioactive material from the right brachium without increased uptake. Despite elevated pressures in the muscle compartments of the right arm, surgical decompression was delayed until a complete blood coagulation profile was obtained. After replacement of deficient blood products, the compartment syndrome resolved without surgical decompression. Defective coagulation leading to hemorrhage into the muscle compartments of the arm resulted in a significant elevation of compartmental pressure. The unusual clinical presentation of the patient, as well as a lack of a positive family history, delayed the diagnosis of hemophilia and the subsequent replacement therapy.

    Title The Uncemented Total Hip Arthroplasty. Intraoperative Femoral Fractures.
    Date October 1988
    Journal Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
    Excerpt

    Intraoperative fractures of the proximal femur occurred in 40 (38 patients) of 630 (6.3%) biological ingrowth total hip arthroplasties performed between January 1984 and July 1986. Twenty-three of these fractures occurred during 131 revision arthroplasties (17.6%) and 17 during 499 primary arthroplasties (3.5%). All but two of the fractures were recognized during surgery. Thirty-seven were treated with either Parham bands or cerclage wires. Bone graft was added to the fracture site in 31 fractures. All of the fractures healed. Three of the patients failed to achieve stable fixation and have required revision surgery. An additional patient has thigh pain with 2 mm of subsidence noted with serial roentgenographs. Femoral fractures can be prevented by preoperative templating of roentgenograms containing markers to measure magnification, routine overreaming of the femoral canal when implanting long-stemmed prostheses, and prophylactically applying wires or bands to femurs requiring the removal of screws.

    Title Parathyroid Hormone Effects on Skeletal Exchangeable Calcium and Bone Blood Flow.
    Date August 1988
    Journal The American Journal of Physiology
    Excerpt

    The effects of alterations in serum calcium levels on the volume of distribution of a calcium tracer in bone and on bone blood flow were investigated in dogs by manipulation of parathyroid status. The volume of distribution increases with increasing serum calcium. This implies that there is a concentration-dependent binding mechanism in the extravascular space of bone, which is not saturated at the levels of serum calcium achieved in these experiments. The skeletal exchangeable calcium was increased in hypercalcemic dogs and decreased in hypocalcemic dogs. Cancellous bone contains proportionately more exchangeable calcium than cortical bone. Bone blood flow was decreased by 50% 15 min after injection of a bolus of parathyroid hormone (PTH) but returned to control values by 240 min. Fifty-two hours after the induction of hypercalcemia with repeated doses of PTH, there was no difference in blood flow over control animals.

    Title Local Treatment for Neuropathic Foot Ulceration and Osteoarthropathy.
    Date June 1985
    Journal Foot & Ankle
    Excerpt

    Forty-one patients with 42 involved feet received local care for neuropathic foot disease. Thirty-one patients had ulcers (nine with associated fractures), and 10 did not (eight with fracture and two with severe ligamentous injury). Patients were examined at least 1 year after initiation of treatment, and follow-up averaged 3 years (range, 1 to 9). Treatment included ulcer cleansing, debridement, local bone excision, molded plaster casts, and antibiotics for patients with significant infection. Most patients used special shoes. Of the 42 involved extremities, 39 (93%) healed with treatment, 21 extremities (50%) remained healed at follow-up examination, and 16 patients (39%) continue to have difficulty with recurrent foot ulceration or osteoarthropathy. Thirty-nine patients (95%) have avoided the need for a major amputation.

    Title Chemisorption of Water at High Temperatures on Kaolinite: Effect on Dehydroxylation.
    Date
    Journal Science (new York, N.y.)
    Excerpt

    The dehydroxylation reaction of kaolinite in a vacuum at 425 degrees C is halted by introducing a water vapor pressure of 47 mm-Hg, and is resumed when the vacuum is reestablished. The sample gains weight corresponding to an approximately monomotecular layer of water on the kaolinite surface. At the temperatures and vapor pressures involved, the sorption is considered to be a chemisorption process.

    Title Kaolmite Layer Structure: Relaxation by Dehydroxylation.
    Date
    Journal Science (new York, N.y.)
    Excerpt

    Single-crystal electron-diffraction data reveal features of metakaolin. The basal plane parameters increase 2.2 percent in formation of metakaolin produced by heating kaolinite in air at 700 degrees C for 12 hours. This increase results from removal of the distortion of sheet structure (relaxation).

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