Internists, Pediatrician
42 years of experience

Accepting new patients
14350 Goldenview Dr
Anchorage, AK 99516
Locations and availability (2)

Education ?

Medical School Score
University of Oklahoma (1968)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Internal Medicine
American Board of Pediatrics

Publications & Research

Dr. Berner has contributed to 10 publications.
Title A Case of Sodium Oxybate Treatment of Tardive Dyskinesia and Bipolar Disorder.
Date September 2008
Journal The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Title Intranasal Ketamine for Intermittent Explosive Disorder: a Case Report.
Date September 2007
Journal The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry
Title Climate Change and Health in the Circumpolar North.
Date February 2006
Journal International Journal of Circumpolar Health
Title Climate Change and Human Health: Infrastructure Impacts to Small Remote Communities in the North.
Date February 2006
Journal International Journal of Circumpolar Health
Excerpt

In northern regions, climate change can include changes in precipitation magnitude and frequency, reductions in sea ice extent and thickness, and climate warming and cooling. These changes can increase the frequency and severity of storms, flooding, or erosion; other changes may include drought or degradation of permafrost. Climate change can result in damage to sanitation infrastructure resulting in the spread of disease or threatening a community's ability to maintain its economy, geographic location and cultural tradition, leading to mental stress. Through monitoring of some basic indicators communities can begin to develop a response to climate change. With this information, planners, engineers, health care professionals and governments can begin to develop approaches to address the challenges related to climate change.

Title The Potential Impact of Climate on Human Exposure to Contaminants in the Arctic.
Date February 2006
Journal International Journal of Circumpolar Health
Excerpt

Many northern indigenous populations are exposed to elevated concentrations of contaminants through traditional food and many of these contaminants come from regions exterior to the Arctic. Global contaminant pathways include the atmosphere, ocean currents, and river outflow, all of which are affected by climate. In addition to these pathways, precipitation, animal availability, UV radiation, cryosphere degradation and human industrial activities in the North are also affected by climate change. The processes governing contaminant behaviour in both the physical and biological environment are complex and therefore, in order to understand how climate change will affect the exposure of northern people to contaminants, we must have a better understanding of the processes that influence how contaminants behave in the Arctic environment. Furthermore, to predict changes in contaminant levels, we need to first have a good understanding of current contaminant levels in the Arctic environment, biota and human populations. For this reason, it is critical that both spatial and temporal trends in contaminant levels are monitored in the environment, biota and human populations from all the Arctic regions.

Title Arctic Health Policy: Contribution of Scientific Data.
Date November 2003
Journal International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health
Excerpt

In Western Hemisphere arctic regions, scientific findings in humans, wildlife, and the environment have resulted in major governmental policy formulations. Government policy resulted in establishment of an effective international organization to address scientifically identified problems, including health disparities in arctic indigenous populations. Western scientific data and indigenous knowledge from initial international programs led to international agreements restricting certain persistent organic pollutants. In recent years, scientific data, and indigenous traditional knowledge, have resulted in governmental policy in the United States, Canada, and Nordic countries that includes the full participation of indigenous residents in defining research agendas, interpreting data, communicating information, and local community policy formulation.

Title Fetal Alcohol Syndrome in Alaska, 1977 Through 1992: an Administrative Prevalence Derived from Multiple Data Sources.
Date June 1998
Journal American Journal of Public Health
Excerpt

OBJECTIVES: The prevalence and characteristics of fetal alcohol syndrome cases and the usefulness of various data sources in surveillance were examined in Alaska to guide prevention and future surveillance efforts. METHODS: Sixteen data sources in Alaska were used to identify children with fetal alcohol syndrome. Medical charts were reviewed to verify cases, and records were reviewed to provide descriptive data. RESULTS: Fetal alcohol syndrome rates varied markedly by birth year and race, with the highest prevalence (4.1 per 1000 live births) found among Alaska Natives born between 1985 and 1988. Screening and referral programs to diagnostic clinics identified 70% of all recorded cases. The intervention program for children 0 to 3 years of age detected 29% of age-appropriate cases, and Medicaid data identified 11% of all cases; birth certificates detected only 9% of the age-appropriate cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate a high prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome in Alaska and illustrate that reliance on any one data source would lead to underestimates of the extent of fetal alcohol syndrome in a population.

Title Hospitalizations for Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection in Alaska Native Children.
Date May 1995
Journal The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Excerpt

To characterize the epidemiology of Alaska Native children hospitalized for respiratory syncytial virus infections, we reviewed records of hospitalizations during the winter seasons of 1991 to 1992 and 1992 to 1993 at a hospital in Anchorage and a rural hospital in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) region of southwestern Alaska. The median age of hospitalization for respiratory syncytial virus infection was 2 months of age for YKD residents and 4.5 months for Anchorage residents. Sixteen percent of the hospitalized YKD children were less than 1 month of age, whereas the same was true for only 3% of the Anchorage children. Eight percent of the YKD patients required mechanical ventilation, whereas none of the Anchorage patients required ventilation. The median hospital stay was 4.8 days for YKD patients and 3.2 days for Anchorage patients. Hospitalization rates for infants less than 1 year of age were 33/1000 for Alaska Natives in Anchorage and 100/1000 for those in the YKD region. The extremely high hospitalization rate, especially among very young infants in the rural YKD region, points to a need for early preventive efforts.

Title Decline of Haemophilus Influenzae Type B Disease in a Region of High Risk: Impact of Passive and Active Immunization.
Date September 1994
Journal The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal
Excerpt

Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) is a major cause of serious childhood bacterial infections. Before 1989 Alaska Native infants in the Yukon Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) had the highest recorded Hib disease rate, 2960:100,000 in children less than 1 year of age with 6 to 35 (mean, 13) cases/year between 1980 and 1988. In July, 1989, Alaska Area Native Health Service initiated a passive immunization project in the YKD using bacterial polysaccharide immunoglobulin (BPIG) administered at 3-month intervals to prevent Hib infections in infants less than 13 months of age. On January 1, 1991, after licensure of Hib conjugate vaccines for infants, the program was modified to a passive-active strategy using BPIG at birth and PedvaxHIB at 2, 4 and 12 months of age. Between July 1, 1989, and December 31, 1990, 80% of YKD children less than 1 year of age received at least 1 dose of BPIG. During this period there were 7 Hib cases in this age group, but only 1 of the cases had received any BPIG. Between January 1, 1991, and December 31, 1992, 4 Hib cases occurred in 2 YKD children. During the combined period, July 1, 1989, to December 31, 1992, the incidence of Hib disease for infants less than 1 year of age was 302:100,000. A dramatic decrease in Hib disease was observed in this high incidence region concurrent with implementation of passive and passive-active immunization strategies.

Title Re: "the Descriptive Epidemiology of Sudden Infant Deaths Among Natives and Whites in Alaska".
Date September 1986
Journal American Journal of Epidemiology

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