Browse Health
Internist, Cardiologist (heart)
11 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score
Texas Tech University (1999)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice 5th Anniversary Award (2013)
Patients' Choice Award (2009 - 2014)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2010 - 2013)
Appointments
University of Vermont College of Medicine Burlington Vt
Faculty - Department of Medicine
Associations
American Board of Internal Medicine

Affiliations ?

Dr. Bradley is affiliated with 6 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Lubbock Heart Hospital
    Cardiology
    4810 N Loop 289, Lubbock, TX 79416
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • University Medical Center - Lubbock
    Cardiology
    602 Indiana Ave, Lubbock, TX 79415
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Covenant Hospital Plainview
    Cardiology
    2601 Dimmitt Rd, Plainview, TX 79072
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Covenant Medical Center
    Cardiology
    3615 19th St, Lubbock, TX 79410
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Covenant Children's Hospital
    3610 21st St, Lubbock, TX 79410
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Covenant Hospital Levelland
    Cardiology
    1900 College Ave, Levelland, TX 79336
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Bradley has contributed to 7 publications.
    Title Complete Cypher Stent Fracture and Migration in the Ostium of the Right Coronary Artery.
    Date April 2007
    Journal The Journal of Invasive Cardiology
    Title Fixed Defect on Stress Myocardial Imaging Resulting from Previous Trauma Masquerading As Coronary Artery Disease.
    Date September 2005
    Journal Clinical Nuclear Medicine
    Title Vitellin Processing and Protein Synthesis During Cricket Embryogenesis.
    Date December 1998
    Journal Insect Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
    Excerpt

    At the start of insect embryogenesis most of the protein mass of the egg cytoplasm exists as vitellin (Vt) obtained endocytically during vitellogenesis. Of the new embryo polypeptides (EP) appearing in the egg during embryogenesis, many are synthesized de novo, while, in some species, others derive from developmentally programmed partial proteolysis of Vt. Earlier we showed that by the end of vitellogenesis the two native Vts in Acheta domesticus exist in opposing gradients along the longitudinal axis of the egg. Here we hypothesize that this ooplasmic Vt distribution presents a milieu for Vt processing out of which region-specific regulatory molecules could arise. The metabolic origin and stage-specific patterns of seven predominant EPs (EP 1-7) identified by SDS-PAGE were examined and the results correlated with developmental morphology during the 14 days of embryogenesis. Based on antibody reactivity, peptide mapping and in vitro radiolabeling, we determined that EPs 1-3, 6 and 7 are Vt-derived, while EPs 4 and 5 are produced de novo by the embryo. The five Vt-derived EPs appear during the first 24 h of embryogenesis when migrating cleavage nuclei and associated cytoplasm form the cellular blastoderm, and levels of EPs 4 and 5 increase during days 4-6 of embryogenesis when katatrepsis and yolk mass contraction occur. Positive periodic acid-Schiff staining indicated that EPs 1-3 and their Vt-precursor polypeptides are glycoproteins. This work shows that developmental stage-specific Vt processing occurs during A. domesticus embryogenesis and points next to investigation of the functional significance of Vt cleavage products during development.

    Title A Fat Body-derived Protein is Selectively Sulfated During Transit to Ovarian Follicles in the Stick Insect Carausius Morosus.
    Date March 1995
    Journal Developmental Biology
    Excerpt

    A monoclonal antibody raised against ovarian follicles of the stick insect Carausius morosus reacted with two related polypeptides of 157 and 85 kDa in both the ovary and the hemolymph. In vitro cultured fat body proved capable of releasing the 157-kDa polypeptide into the culture medium and processing it to the lower-molecular-weight polypeptide of 85 kDa. This was further demonstrated by in vitro exposure to [35S]methionine. Under the same culturing conditions, ovarian follicles proved incapable of synthesizing and/or secreting the 85-kDa polypeptide. However, in vivo [35S]methionine-labeled ovarian follicles released both polypeptides when cultured in vitro for up to 24 hr. Vitellogenin polypeptides were labeled in vivo following exposure to [3H]glucosamine, while 157- and 85-kDa polypeptides were labeled only in ovarian follicles exposed in vivo to sodium [35S]sulfate. Under in vitro conditions, the 157-kDa polypeptide could be labeled with sodium [35S]sulfate only if ovarian follicles were cocultured with fat body. No sulfation occurred in fat body or ovarian follicles cultured separately. These experiments suggest that the 157-kDa polypeptide is a fat body-derived polypeptide that is sulfated upon transfer to the ovarian follicle.

    Title [3h] Corticosterone Binding Activity of Adrenal Incubation Media in Response to in Vivo and in Vitro Acth Stimulation.
    Date February 1980
    Journal Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
    Title Characterization of Seminal Plasma Proteins and Sperm Proteins in Ejaculates from Normospermic Bulls and Bulls with Thermally-induced Testicular Degeneration.
    Date
    Journal Theriogenology
    Excerpt

    Semen was collected from 5 mature beef bulls by electroejaculation before, during, and after 20 days of scrotal insulation. Thermally-induced testicular degeneration was irreversible in 3 of the bulls. Analysis of sperm and seminal plasma polypeptides revealed that 15 to 30 sperm polypeptides and 25 to 30 seminal plasma polypeptides were indistinguishable between bulls prior to the insulation treatment. Changes in the sperm polypeptides pattern appeared as early as 2 days after the insulation treatment and persisted for at least 11 months in 2 of the bulls. In the spermatozoa, there was a detectable loss of 31, 34, 49 and 58 kDa polypeptides and an appearance of 6 to 8 new major polypeptides, ranging from 32 to 83 kDa. The 83 kDa polypeptide was most prominent in the 2 bulls that regained normal sperm motility and morphology following the insulation period. The post-insulation appearance of a seminal plasma polypeptide (circa 60 kDa) was also identified in these 2 bulls. Seminal plasma polypeptides remained qualitatively unaltered by the insulation treatment in the 3 bulls with irreversible testicular degeneration.

    Title Extravascular Closure for Patients with High-risk Femoral Anatomy.
    Date
    Journal The Journal of Invasive Cardiology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Vascular closure devices (VCDs) improve patient comfort and decrease time to ambulation. However, VCD studies have excluded patients with high-risk femoral artery anatomy; we examined the safety and efficacy of clip-based extravascular closure in this high-risk group. METHODS: We performed a prospective registry enrolling 98 consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic coronary angiography. Inclusion criteria were femoral artery calcification, moderate femoral artery stenosis, or non-femoral arterial sheath insertion. All patients underwent immediate vessel closure with the Starclose device (Abbott Vascular). Patients with severe femoral arterial disease or femoral arterial diameter < or = 4.0 mm were excluded. Hospital outcomes were assessed prospectively and femoral arterial stenosis was determined by quantitative angiography. RESULTS: Inclusion was mainly related to at least one of 3 main high-risk characteristics: moderate femoral arterial stenosis (30%), femoral arterial calcification (24%) or nonfemoral sheath insertion (46%). The average femoral stenosis was 35.3 +/- 5.1% among patients included for a significant femoral disease. There was a 100% procedural and 94% device success: 1 patient required manual compression for greater than or equal to 30 minutes. The average time from sheath removal to hemostasis was 0.76 +/- 1.3 minutes. Despite the higher-risk anatomy, there were no major vascular complications and only one minor vascular complication. The average time to ambulation was 78.1 +/- 47.3 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: In this prospective registry, the Starclose VCD was safe and effective for early ambulation of patients despite the presence of high-risk femoral arterial anatomy.

    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Muhammed Ali

    Internal Medicine
    14 years experience
    Lubbock, TX

    Dr. Marc Levine

    Internal Medicine
    27 years experience
    Lubbock, TX

    Dr. Juan Kurdi

    Internal Medicine
    14 years experience
    Lubbock, TX

    Dr. Paul Walter

    Internal Medicine
    39 years experience
    Lubbock, TX

    Dr. James Moss

    Internal Medicine
    25 years experience
    Lubbock, TX

    Dr. John Zias

    Internal Medicine
    27 years experience
    Lubbock, TX
    Search All Similar Doctors