Urologist
11 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Coaldale
360 W Ruddle St
Coaldale, PA 18218
570-645-1898
Locations and availability (5)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
Columbia University (1999)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice Award (2010 - 2011, 2013)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2010 - 2011, 2013)
Top 10 Doctor - State (2014)
Pennsylvania
Urologist
Associations
American Board of Urology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Bingham is affiliated with 11 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Sacred Heart Hospital/Allentown
    421 Chew St, Allentown, PA 18102
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Lehigh Valley Hospital - Muhlenberg
    Urology
    2545 Schoenersville Rd, Bethlehem, PA 18017
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Warren Hospital
  • Lehigh Valley Hospital - Allentown Campuses
  • St. Luke's Miners Memorial Hospital
  • Saint Luke's Hospital - Allentown Campus
  • St Lukes Roosevelt Hospital Center
  • Lehigh Valley Hospital
  • St Luke's Quakertown Hospital
  • St Lukes Hospital
  • St. Luke's Hospital/Bethlehem
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Bingham has contributed to 60 publications.
    Title Transurethral Resection of the Ejaculatory Ducts for Treating Ejaculatory Symptoms.
    Date February 2005
    Journal Bju International
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To report our experience with transurethral resection of the ejaculatory ducts (TURED) in infertile men with symptomatic ejaculatory duct obstruction (EDO). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Before surgery, all patients complained of a decrease in the volume of their ejaculate, 14 of 15 had a non-projectile ejaculation, nine had a genitourinary infection necessitating antibiotic treatment, and five had pain with orgasm. The mean ejaculate volume and total motile sperm count was 1.1 mL and 8.1 million sperm per ejaculate. After surgery, at a mean follow-up of 2 months, 10 men reported having projectile ejaculation, and eight reported a marked improvement in their sensation of orgasm. Overall, 14 men reported a subjective improvement in their ejaculation. The average postoperative ejaculate volume was 2.3 mL and the total motile sperm count was 38.1 million per ejaculate. CONCLUSIONS: Men with symptomatic EDO who underwent TURED showed improvements in their ejaculation, sensation of orgasm, semen analysis values and fertility.

    Title Actin-related Protein 1 and Cytoplasmic Dynein-based Motility - What's the Connection?
    Date January 2005
    Journal Trends in Cell Biology
    Excerpt

    The actin-related protein Arp1 works in conjunction with the microtubule-based motor cytoplasmic dynein to drive many types of intracellular motility. In vertebrate cells, Arp1 is present exclusively in the form of a 37-nm filament that constitutes the backbone of dynactin, a 1.2-MDa macromolecular complex containing nine other polypeptides. Dynactin has been proposed to function as the link between dynein and its cargo. Recent work indicates that the dynactin subunit p150(Glued) mediates the interaction of the dynactin molecule with dynein and microtubules, leaving the Arp1 filament as a possible cargo-binding domain. Mechanisms for binding of F-actin to membranes are discussed as models of the Arp1-membrane interaction.

    Title A Novel Surgical Approach to Subinguinal Varicocelectomy: Artery and Lymphatic Isolation Technique.
    Date August 2004
    Journal Urologia Internationalis
    Excerpt

    Clinically relevant varicoceles require surgical management through one of several techniques. We introduce an innovative technique for varicocelectomy via a subinguinal approach that allows identification and preservation of the arteries and lymphatics. This method allows the safe excision of the varicocele, while minimizing the risk of complications.

    Title The Urological Care and Outcome of Pregnancy After Urinary Tract Reconstruction.
    Date May 2004
    Journal Bju International
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the obstetric and urological outcomes during and after pregnancy following urinary tract reconstruction, as pregnancies after such surgery can have a significant effect on the function of the reconstructed urinary tract, and the reconstruction can significantly affect the delivery of the fetus. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the obstetric and urological history of 11 patients (12 pregnancies; 10 singletons and one twin) with previous urinary reconstruction, delivered between 1989 and 2003. Antepartum and postpartum urological function and obstetric outcomes were investigated. RESULTS: All the patients had some difficulty with clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) during pregnancy, and four needed continuous indwelling catheters. During pregnancy 10 women had several bladder infections and all received antibiotic suppression. There were eight Caesarean sections, two vaginal deliveries and one combined delivery. Six Caesareans were elective and three were emergent. The use of CIC returned to normal in all patients after delivery. CONCLUSIONS: Women with a urinary reconstruction can have successful pregnancies. The complexity of the surgery and the concern for possible emergency Caesarean section resulted in most patients having an elective Caesarean delivery before term. Antibiotic prophylaxis is recommended and patients may require indwelling dwelling catheters while pregnant but normal CIC can be resumed after delivery.

    Title Positron Emission Tomography with Fdg to Show Thymic Carcinoid.
    Date March 2004
    Journal Ajr. American Journal of Roentgenology
    Title Endoscopic Treatment of Fibroepithelial Polyps of the Renal Pelvis and Ureter.
    Date December 2003
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To report our experience on the endoscopic treatment of large fibroepithelial polyps of the renal pelvis and ureter. Fibroepithelial polyps of the upper urinary tract are rare benign tumors that have traditionally been treated by open exploration and resection. METHODS: Five patients underwent either percutaneous or ureteroscopic treatment of a renal pelvic or ureteral fibroepithelial polyp by electroresection or holmium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet laser resection. RESULTS: All 5 patients were without recurrence after endoscopic resection. The mean follow-up was 19.6 months (range 6 to 41). The average length of stay was 3 days (range 2 to 5) and 0.5 day (range 0 to 1) for those undergoing percutaneous and ureteroscopic treatment, respectively. No major complications resulted from either approach, and no ureteral strictures have developed. All patients treated remain recurrence free. CONCLUSIONS: Endoscopic management of large fibroepithelial polyps of the renal pelvis and ureter is an acceptable treatment modality with minimal morbidity and durable treatment results. The percutaneous approach offers the advantage of identifying the base of the polyp under direct visualization, allowing safe destruction of the stalk and efficient removal of the entire polyp. To our knowledge, this is the first reported series of percutaneous, antegrade excision of fibroepithelial polyps.

    Title Case of the Month: A Young Man with a Lump on the Head.
    Date April 2003
    Journal The British Journal of Radiology
    Title Where Can Fdg-pet Contribute Most to Anatomical Imaging Problems?
    Date January 2003
    Journal The British Journal of Radiology
    Title Evidence for the Role of Demyelination, Hla-dr Alleles, and Cytokines in the Pathogenesis of Parvovirus B19 Meningoencephalitis and Its Sequelae.
    Date January 2003
    Journal Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To review the clinical and pathological features of parvovirus B19 meningoencephalitis and its sequelae in 12 previously published cases, and to perform additional tests to determine the pathogenesis of the disease. METHODS: Cases were reviewed and available serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tested for antiganglioside antibodies and a range of cytokines. In situ hybridisation for parvovirus B19 DNA was performed on postmortem brain tissue in two cases. HLA-DRB1 typing was undertaken on genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood leucocytes. RESULTS: Cerebellar involvement was suggested either clinically or pathologically in four cases. In the two cases with postmortem histology, there was marked atrophy of the molecular and granular layers of the cerebellum with focal loss of Purkinje cells. Brain scanning by MRI or CT was done in six cases during the acute phase. Three were abnormal with evidence of demyelination. Three had markedly enlarged ventricles, in two of which there was high signal intensity from the white matter on both T1 and T2 weighted images. The three cases with abnormal brain scans had long term neurological sequelae (mental retardation, personality change, altered affect). In situ hybridisation on available postmortem brain tissue was negative in the two cases tested. All cases in which HLA-DR alleles were determined carried at least one of the following alleles: HLA-DRB1*01, *04, *07, *09, *15, *16. Available serum and CSF was tested for antiganglioside antibodies (all negative) and for a panel of cytokines, which had a similar profile in both serum (n = 5) and CSF (n = 1) during the acute phase. Cytokines that were consistently detectable were IL-6 (mean 726.20 pg/ml), TNFalpha (50.64 pg/ml), IFNgamma (39.64 pg/ml), GM-CSF (216.12 pg/ml), and MCP-1 (154.43 pg/ml); IL-1beta, IL-5, and IL-13 were undetectable. CONCLUSIONS: HLA-DR associations, an increased cytokine response, and benefit from immunomodulatory treatment (in one case) support a role for the immune response in the pathogenesis of parvovirus B19 meningoencephalitis.

    Title Buccal Mucosa Grafts for Hypospadias Surgery: Long-term Results.
    Date October 2002
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: We review the long-term results of buccal mucosa grafts used as part of secondary hypospadias repair. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We evaluated 47 patients for 10 years and analyzed long-term results of buccal mucosa grafts for hypospadias repair. Of the 47 patients 40 have been followed for more than 3 years. RESULTS: The overall complication rate was 32% (13 of 47 cases). All complications occurred in the first 6 months following surgery, and the complication rate was significantly lower in the last 7 years of the series (19%) compared to the first 3 years (60%) (p = 0.01). All 3 patients in this series with a preoperative diagnosis of balanitis xerotica obliterans had a significant postoperative complication. CONCLUSIONS: Buccal mucosa appears to be a durable source of nongenital tissue for urethral replacement. Attention to detail in terms of graft harvest, graft preparation and graft fixation helps to avoid major postoperative complications. Onlay grafts appear to be preferable to tube grafts, and patients with the diagnosis of balanitis xerotica obliterans would appear not to be candidates for 1-stage urethral reconstruction using buccal mucosa.

    Title Does Gh Replacement Therapy in Adult Gh-deficient Patients Result in Recurrence or Increase in Size of Pituitary Tumours?
    Date July 2002
    Journal European Journal of Endocrinology / European Federation of Endocrine Societies
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Hypopituitary GH-deficient patients have an increased cardiovascular mortality and GH replacement in this population has resulted in considerable therapeutic benefit. GH replacement involves administration of a potentially mitogenic substance to patients with a previous or residual pituitary tumour. Our objective was to evaluate whether GH replacement results in an increase in the size of pituitary tumours. METHODS: This was a non-randomised observational study on patients recruited from the endocrine clinic. All subjects had GH deficiency, proven on an insulin tolerance test and were divided into those who were or were not receiving long-term GH replacement. Comparison of change in pituitary size was made with interval radiological imaging of the pituitary. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients (40 men and 35 women) were in the study, 47 were on long-term GH replacement and there were 28 controls. The average length of treatment for the treated group was 3.6 patient years. Thirty-nine patients in the treated group had at least 2 years of GH treatment between imaging studies of the pituitary. Two patients in the treated group had an increase in pituitary size (non-functioning adenomas) and two in the control group (one functioning and one non-functioning adenoma adenoma). None of these four patients required further treatment. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Using a representative cohort of hypopituitary patients attending an endocrine clinic, GH replacement was not associated with an increased pituitary tumour recurrence rate. Although the results are not conclusive, in the period of observation GH had little adverse effect but longer studies are required to be certain.

    Title Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Trilucent Tm Breast Implants.
    Date July 2002
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Excerpt

    AIM: To demonstrate the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances of intact and ruptured Trilucent TM implants with imaging and surgical correlation. The appearances of the implant transponder artefact are also described MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the MRI findings in 34 patients with bilateral subpectoral Trilucent TM breast implants (Lipomatrix, Inc./Collagen Aesthetics International Inc., Neuchatel, Switzerland) was performed. Patients under implant surveillance and those with suspected implant rupture formed the study group. Imaging findings were correlated with surgical appearances. RESULTS: Surgical correlation was available in 53% of patients. Fifty per cent (18/36) of implants were intact at surgery, 50% (18/36) of implants were ruptured. Of the 18 ruptured implants, 17 were intracapsular ruptures and one an extracapsular rupture. The sensitivity of MRI for detection of intracapsular rupture in Trilucent TM breast implants was 82% specificity 76%, positive predictive value 78%, negative predictive value 81% and accuracy 79% in this study group. No case of implant rupture was obscured by the transponder artefact. Four implants were found to have 'pseudocapsules' at surgery (5.9%), the implants were intact with fluid present between the implant and capsule. Only one pseudocapsule was demonstrated on MRI. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging is currently the most accurate technique for diagnosis of implant rupture in Trilucent TM breast implants. Transponder artefact does not appear to interfere with the assessment of implant rupture.

    Title Clinical Predictors in the Use of Finasteride for Control of Gross Hematuria Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.
    Date June 2002
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: We identify predictors of clinical response as well as response time in patients treated with finasteride for gross hematuria due to benign prostatic hyperplasia. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective chart review was preformed of 53 patients who had been given 5 mg. finasteride daily for the treatment of active bleeding or a recent history of recurrent bleeding. Urological evaluations were negative for tumor in all patients. A history of prostatectomy, anticoagulant status and prostate size was determined. The degree of hematuria was then graded before and after finasteride treatment according to our previously described system. Of the 53 patients who were actively bleeding at initial evaluation 16 were followed to determine time required for complete resolution of hematuria. RESULTS: Hematuria grade improved after finasteride in 50 (94%) patients. Overall 77% of patients (41 of 53) experienced no further bleeding while taking finasteride. Mean followup was 38 months (range 3 to 86). Of the patients 86% (12 of 14) taking coumadin, 77% (10 of 13) taking aspirin and 73% (19 of 26) on no anticoagulants had no further bleeding once on finasteride. Of the patients who had undergone prior transurethral prostatectomy 84% (26 of 31) experienced no further bleeding versus 68% (15 of 22) of those who had not undergone previous surgery. In the 16 patients who began finasteride while actively bleeding the average time to clear urine was 12 days (range 2 to 45). Prostatic volume correlated with the average time needed for resolution of hematuria, which was 2.7 days or longer for small (less than 40 gm.), 10.3 days or longer for large (40 to 100), 19 days or longer for extra large (100 to 150) and 45 days or longer for extra extra large (greater than 150) glands. Hematuria resolved an average of 5.5 days versus 18.6 days in those who had or had not undergone previous prostatectomy, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our long-term followup demonstrates finasteride as a useful treatment for benign prostatic hyperplasia related gross hematuria, which is effective in patients who are on anticoagulants. In patients with larger prostatic volumes a longer time to response and higher incidence of recurrent but lower grade bleeding should be anticipated compared to those who have undergone prior prostatectomy or have a smaller prostate.

    Title Case of the Month: Congenital Unilateral Proptosis.
    Date April 2002
    Journal The British Journal of Radiology
    Title Lower Limb and Back Pain in Guillain-barré Syndrome and Associated Contrast Enhancement in Mri of the Cauda Equina.
    Date December 2001
    Journal Acta Paediatrica (oslo, Norway : 1992)
    Excerpt

    This study assesses the frequency of lower limb and back pain in children with Guillain-Barré syndrome and reviews the magnetic resonance imaging results of those undergoing spinal imaging. Over an 8-y period, nine children presented with various combinations of severe back pain, leg pains, impairment of gait and bladder dysfunction. Guillain-Barré syndrome was confirmed on clinical examination and peripheral electrophysiology (n = 8). Magnetic resonance imaging in four patients, following contrast injection, showed enhancement of the cauda equine and, additionally, of the cervical nerve roots in one of the patients. A further patient, who was not scanned with contrast, had abnormal thickening of the lumbar roots. Carbamazepine and steroids were effectively used for analgesia in three cases. All the patients recovered. Conclusion: Guillain-Barré syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of children presenting with back and/or leg pain. Early diagnosis ensures prompt monitoring for autonomic dysfunction and respiratory compromise.

    Title Mri of the Brain in Hiv-positive Patients: What is the Value of Routine Intravenous Contrast Medium?
    Date November 1999
    Journal Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    Our purpose was to assess the value of routine administration of intravenous gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA) for cranial MR in a series of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients. Two radiologists retrospectively reviewed 150 consecutive examinations of 104 patients. All patients underwent unenhanced and contrast-enhanced images. Each radiologist independently assessed first the unenhanced images alone and then the pre- and postinjection images together. Then both reviewed the complete study and produced a consensus report. The history, investigations and management were collated separately and were unknown to the radiologists. Contrast-enhanced T1-weighted images showed new focal abnormalities, not seen on the T2-weighted or unenhanced images in 15 (14 %) patients, but almost always in the context of abnormal unenhanced images. In only 2 patients (2 %) did contrast medium reveal abnormalities when the unenhanced study had been considered normal. In only 1 of these (1 %) was the new finding, cytomegalovirus diffuse ependymal enhancement, of clinical importance, although the diagnosis of encephalitis was made on routine examination of cerebrospinal-fluid. The other revealed a toxoplasma lesion in a patient known to have resolving disease. Meningeal disease not suspected on the unenhanced images was shown in 2 patients (2 %). In these case the unenhanced images were abnormal in other respects. Intravenous Gd-DTPA was helpful to the radiologist in making a radiological diagnosis in 11 patients (11 %), usually by improving characterisation of a lesion seen on the unenhanced images. The contribution of intravenous Gd-DTPA in this series does not warrant recommending its use in every case.

    Title Analysis of Dynactin Subcomplexes Reveals a Novel Actin-related Protein Associated with the Arp1 Minifilament Pointed End.
    Date November 1999
    Journal The Journal of Cell Biology
    Excerpt

    The multisubunit protein, dynactin, is a critical component of the cytoplasmic dynein motor machinery. Dynactin contains two distinct structural domains: a projecting sidearm that interacts with dynein and an actin-like minifilament backbone that is thought to bind cargo. Here, we use biochemical, ultrastructural, and molecular cloning techniques to obtain a comprehensive picture of dynactin composition and structure. Treatment of purified dynactin with recombinant dynamitin yields two assemblies: the actin-related protein, Arp1, minifilament and the p150(Glued) sidearm. Both contain dynamitin. Treatment of dynactin with the chaotropic salt, potassium iodide, completely depolymerizes the Arp1 minifilament to reveal multiple protein complexes that contain the remaining dynactin subunits. The shoulder/sidearm complex contains p150(Glued), dynamitin, and p24 subunits and is ultrastructurally similar to dynactin's flexible projecting sidearm. The dynactin shoulder complex, which contains dynamitin and p24, is an elongated, flexible assembly that may link the shoulder/sidearm complex to the Arp1 minifilament. Pointed-end complex contains p62, p27, and p25 subunits, plus a novel actin-related protein, Arp11. p62, p27, and p25 contain predicted cargo-binding motifs, while the Arp11 sequence suggests a pointed-end capping activity. These isolated dynactin subdomains will be useful tools for further analysis of dynactin assembly and function.

    Title Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in an Indian Man: Mr Appearance of an Uncommon Cause of Cord Compression.
    Date September 1999
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Title Heterotopic Pancreas As Lead Point in Intussusception: New Variant of Vitellointestinal Tract Malformation.
    Date July 1999
    Journal Pediatric and Developmental Pathology : the Official Journal of the Society for Pediatric Pathology and the Paediatric Pathology Society
    Excerpt

    Two cases of intussusception are reported with heterotopic pancreatic tissue attached to and draining into the ileum. The first patient, a boy aged 16 months, presented with ileoileal intussusception. The diagnosis was confirmed on ultrasound scan. Laparotomy and resection were performed. A 12-mm nodule of heterotopic pancreatic tissue was identified in the ileal serosa at the apex of the intussusceptum, fully formed with acinar tissue, islets, and draining duct. The second patient, also a boy aged 16 months, presented with obstructed ileocolic intussusception in which the lead point at surgery resembled a Meckel's diverticulum. Histopathology revealed a similar 10-mm nodule of fully formed pancreatic tissue in the ileal serosal tissues, with some acinar tissue extending through the wall of the intestine alongside ductal structures. In both cases there was ectopic gastric mucosa either in the distal part of the draining duct or in the small intestine itself at the opening. Heterotopic pancreas is a rare cause of intussusception. We propose that this lesion is of vitellointestinal tract origin, conceptually similar to a Meckel's diverticulum but without a diverticulum as such. Heterotopic pancreatic tissue occurring alone is more common in the proximal small intestine, duodenum, and stomach than in the ileum, and it is often asymptomatic.

    Title Self-regulated Polymerization of the Actin-related Protein Arp1.
    Date April 1999
    Journal Current Biology : Cb
    Excerpt

    The actin-related protein Arp1 (or centractin, actin RPV) is the major subunit of dynactin, a key component of the cytoplasmic dynein motor machinery [1] [2] [3]. Of the ubiquitously expressed members of the Arp superfamily, Arp1 is most similar to conventional actin [4] [5] [6] and, on the basis of conserved sequence features, is predicted to bind ATP and possibly polymerize. In vivo, all cytosolic Arp1 sediments at 20S [7] suggesting that it assembles into oligomers, most likely dynactin - a multiprotein complex known to contain eight or nine Arp1 monomers in a 37 nm filament [8]. The uniform length of Arp1 polymers suggests a novel assembly mechanism that may be governed by a 'ruler' activity. In dynactin, the Arp1 filament is bounded by actin-capping protein at one end and a heterotetrameric protein complex containing the p62 subunit (D.M. Eckley, S.R. Gill, J.B.B., J.E. Heuser, T.A.S., unpublished observations) at the other [8]. In the present study, we analyzed the behavior of highly purified, native Arp1. Arp1 was found to polymerize rapidly into short filaments that were similar, but not identical, in length to those in dynactin. With time, these filaments appeared to anneal to form longer assemblies but never attained the length of conventional actin filaments.

    Title Purification of Dynactin and Dynein from Brain Tissue.
    Date November 1998
    Journal Methods in Enzymology
    Title Magnetic Resonance Imaging Features of Pituitary Yttrium-90 Rod Implantation.
    Date September 1998
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Excerpt

    Intersellar implantation of yttrium-90 rods was a common treatment for a variety of pituitary tumours in the 1960s and 1970s. The magnetic resonance (MR) imaging features in three patients with implants (two for growth hormone-secreting and one for prolactin-secreting pituitary adenomas) are presented: the implants appeared as low signal cylinders with no image distortion, in contradistinction to CT where the implants generate beam hardening and back projection artefacts. Confident evaluation of the pituitary fossa for residential tumour and sequelae of therapy could be made on MR. It is the imaging technique of choice in the follow-up of patients treated with yttrium-90 implants.

    Title Evaluation of Fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography in the Management of Soft-tissue Sarcomas.
    Date June 1998
    Journal The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. British Volume
    Excerpt

    We performed a retrospective analysis to evaluate the ability of whole-body F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) to identify local recurrence and pulmonary metastases in patients with soft-tissue tumours after treatment. We compared the results of FDG PET with those of MRI for the detection of local recurrence, and with CT of the chest for pulmonary metastases. We assessed 62 patients of mean age 51 years, who had 15 types of soft-tissue sarcoma, after a mean follow-up of 3 years 2 months. For the detection of local disease, 71 comparisons showed that the sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET were 73.7% and 94.3%, respectively; there were 14 true-positive and five false-negative results. MRI had a sensitivity and specificity of 88.2% and 96.0% respectively. For the identification of lung metastases, 70 comparisons showed that the sensitivity and specificity of FDG PET were 86.7% and 100%, with 13 true-positive results and two false-negative results. CT of the chest had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 96.4%. Thirteen other sites of metastases were identified by FDG PET. FDG PET can identify both local and distant recurrence of tumour as a one-step procedure and will detect other metastases. It seems that all three methods of imaging are needed to define accurately the extent of disease, both at initial staging and during follow-up.

    Title Cyclosporine-related Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy: Mri.
    Date December 1997
    Journal Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    Three patients aged 48, 11 and 40 years, two of whom were recent recipients of renal transplants and one of a bone marrow transplant, developed seizures, with cortical blindness in two cases. All were immunosuppressed with cyclosporine and were hypertensive at the onset of symptoms. MRI showed predominantly posterior signal changes in all three cases. The abnormalities were more conspicuous on fast FLAIR images than on conventional T2-weighted spin-echo images.

    Title Imaging and Pathological Features of Primary Malignant Rhabdoid Tumours of the Brain and Spine.
    Date December 1997
    Journal Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    In this article two cases of primary malignant extrarenal rhabdoid tumour are described. In the affected children the brain and the spinal cord were the primary sites of origin of the tumour. The imaging findings are presented and the pathology discussed. Although the imaging features are non-specific, rhabdoid tumour should be included in the differential diagnosis of childhood intracranial and spinal neoplasms.

    Title The Role of Ct and Mr in Imaging the Complications of Sickle Cell Disease.
    Date December 1997
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Excerpt

    Sickle cell disease is the most common inherited haemoglobinopathy described. Complications of sickle cell disease (SCD) are due to chronic haemolysis of fragile red cells or secondary to vascular occlusion by sickled red cells with subsequent tissue infarction. Traditionally plain film radiography has been the mainstay in the assessment of patients with SCD, but increasingly magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computed tomography (CT) are being used. In this review the imaging features of a range of complications of SCD are demonstrated with particular emphasis on CT and MR.

    Title The Use of Prophylactic Antibiotics in Ultrasound-guided Transrectal Prostate Biopsy.
    Date November 1997
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Excerpt

    The use of antibiotic prophylaxis for transrectal prostate biopsy significantly reduces the incidence of infective complications, but no recommendations exist as to the most appropriate antibiotic regimen. This study was designed to find out which antibiotics were used in different departments and the financial cost of each regimen. A postal survey of 144 hospitals in the UK and Ireland was undertaken. Respondents were asked the name(s), dose(s), route(s) of administration and timing of antibiotics given pre and post biopsy. The response rate was 73.6%. Thirteen different antibiotics were used in 48 different regimens. The most commonly used antibiotic was metronidazole (orally or rectally) in 55% of regimens followed by oral ciprofloxacin in 48% and intravenous gentamicin in 48%. Most regimens (89.7%) contained an oral antibiotic and 58.6% contained an intravenous antibiotic. The cheapest regimen cost 38.7p/patient and the most expensive pounds sterling 21.36/patient, calculated according to prices quoted in the British National Formulary, March 1996. We conclude that there is a lack of standardization in antibiotic prophylaxis for ultrasound-guided transrectal prostate biopsy with widely differing costs for the different regimens. A review of the literature shows that oral antibiotics are inexpensive, well tolerated and effective at reducing the incidence of urinary tract infection and fever following transrectal prostate biopsy. A regimen is proposed including ciprofloxacin or norfloxacin. The addition of oral metronidazole is a subject for further study.

    Title Antibiotic Prophylaxis for Transrectal Prostate Biopsy.
    Date May 1997
    Journal The Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
    Title Molecular Requirements for Bi-directional Movement of Phagosomes Along Microtubules.
    Date May 1997
    Journal The Journal of Cell Biology
    Excerpt

    Microtubules facilitate the maturation of phagosomes by favoring their interactions with endocytic compartments. Here, we show that phagosomes move within cells along tracks of several microns centrifugally and centripetally in a pH- and microtubule-dependent manner. Phagosome movement was reconstituted in vitro and required energy, cytosol and membrane proteins of this organelle. The activity or presence of these phagosome proteins was regulated as the organelle matured, with "late" phagosomes moving threefold more frequently than "early" ones. The majority of moving phagosomes were minus-end directed; the remainder moved towards microtubule plus-ends and a small subset moved bi-directionally. Minus-end movement showed pharmacological characteristics expected for dyneins, was inhibited by immunodepletion of cytoplasmic dynein and could be restored by addition of cytoplasmic dynein. Plus-end movement displayed pharmacological properties of kinesin, was inhibited partially by immunodepletion of kinesin and fully by addition of an anti-kinesin IgG. Immunodepletion of dynactin, a dynein-activating complex, inhibited only minus-end directed motility. Evidence is provided for a dynactin-associated kinase required for dynein-mediated vesicle transport. Movement in both directions was inhibited by peptide fragments from kinectin (a putative kinesin membrane receptor), derived from the region to which a motility-blocking antibody binds. Polypeptide subunits from these microtubule-based motility factors were detected on phagosomes by immunoblotting or immunoelectron microscopy. This is the first study using a single in vitro system that describes the roles played by kinesin, kinectin, cytoplasmic dynein, and dynactin in the microtubule-mediated movement of a purified membrane organelle.

    Title Fusion or Apposition? A Case of a Broken Horseshoe Kidney.
    Date March 1997
    Journal Clinical Nuclear Medicine
    Title Opposing Motor Activities Are Required for the Organization of the Mammalian Mitotic Spindle Pole.
    Date December 1996
    Journal The Journal of Cell Biology
    Excerpt

    We use both in vitro and in vivo approaches to examine the roles of Eg5 (kinesin-related protein), cytoplasmic dynein, and dynactin in the organization of the microtubules and the localization of NuMA (Nu-clear protein that associates with the Mitotic Apparatus) at the polar ends of the mammalian mitotic spindle. Perturbation of the function of Eg5 through either immunodepletion from a cell free system for assembly of mitotic asters or antibody microinjection into cultured cells leads to organized astral microtubule arrays with expanded polar regions in which the minus ends of the microtubules emanate from a ring-like structure that contains NuMA. Conversely, perturbation of the function of cytoplasmic dynein or dynactin through either specific immunodepletition from the cell free system or expression of a dominant negative subunit of dynactin in cultured cells results in the complete lack of organization of microtubules and the failure to efficiently concentrate the NuMA protein despite its association with the microtubules. Simultaneous immunodepletion of these proteins from the cell free system for mitotic aster assembly indicates that the plus end-directed activity of Eg5 antagonizes the minus end-directed activity of cytoplasmic dynein and a minus end-directed activity associated with NuMA during the organization of the microtubules into a morphologic pole. Taken together, these results demonstrate that the unique organization of the minus ends of microtubules and the localization of NuMA at the polar ends of the mammalian mitotic spindle can be accomplished in a centrosome-independent manner by the opposing activities of plus end- and minus end-directed motors.

    Title Primary Malignant Rhabdoid Tumour of the Brain.
    Date August 1996
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Title Avascular Necrosis of the Hamate.
    Date September 1994
    Journal Journal of Hand Surgery (edinburgh, Scotland)
    Excerpt

    Avascular necrosis of the hamate is a rare condition, only one case having been reported in the literature (Van Demark and Parke, 1992). This reflects the relative rarity of fractures of the body of the hamate and the arrangement of the intraosseous vascular anatomy. A case is presented, which was diagnosed by MR Imaging and treated surgically.

    Title Case of the Month: a Tightening of the Belt.
    Date September 1994
    Journal The British Journal of Radiology
    Title Major Lectin of Alligator Liver is Specific for Mannose/l-fucose.
    Date August 1994
    Journal The Journal of Biological Chemistry
    Excerpt

    We surveyed the calcium-requiring (C-type) lectins in alligator liver. The major lectin purified by affinity chromatography was termed alligator hepatic lectin (AHL) and was found to be specific for mannose/L-fucose. AHL contained approximately equal amounts of 21- and 23-kDa bands upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Binding characteristics of AHL were similar to those of hepatic lectins of other classes in that 1) only terminal monosaccharide was recognized, and 2) the affinity increased exponentially when neoglycoproteins containing increasing numbers of mannose or L-fucose were used as ligand. However, unlike mammalian and chicken hepatic lectins, which exist as hexamers in Triton-containing solutions, AHL was present mainly as monomers, although small amounts of dimer and higher oligomers were present in equilibrium. Mannose-binding proteins and mannose-specific lectins of macrophages bind N-acetylmannosamine, glucose, and N-acetylglucosamine in addition to mannose, indicating that the nature and orientation of the C-2 substituent are not important to these lectins. In contrast, AHL shows a strict requirement for the presence of an axial hydroxyl group at the C-2 position (i.e. mannose).

    Title Modern Imaging Methods in Oncology.
    Date March 1993
    Journal Acta Oncologica (stockholm, Sweden)
    Excerpt

    Modern imaging methods are very important in the management of patients with cancer and of their disease. It is vital that clinicians treating them understand the relevance of different imaging techniques for specific applications, so that the best choice can be made to aid diagnosis and monitor response to treatment. This review briefly covers the development and principles of the diverse imaging methods available, from the discovery of x-rays by Röntgen in 1895 to the recent techniques of magnetic resonance and positron emission tomography. The authors endeavour to point out the strengths and weaknesses of each method, using clinical examples where appropriate. Finally, future developments are discussed. It is hoped that this review will aid clinicians diagnosing and treating cancer patients to choose the most suitable imaging method for their patients from among the vast array available.

    Title Mucormycosis Osteomyelitis Causing Avascular Necrosis of the Cuboid Bone: Mr Imaging Findings.
    Date November 1992
    Journal Ajr. American Journal of Roentgenology
    Title Mri in Diabetes Insipidus Due to Metastatic Breast Carcinoma.
    Date November 1992
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Excerpt

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been established as a valuable imaging modality in the evaluation of pituitary disorders. We describe three women with known carcinoma of the breast, who presented acutely with biochemically proven diabetes insipidus (DI), in whom MRI was used as the primary investigative tool. The patients were studied using a 1.5T superconducting system, with gadolinium enhancement in two cases. All three had thickened pituitary stalks and two had complete loss of the normal high signal from the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland. Two also had enlargement of the anterior pituitary gland. One subject was also noted to have other metastases to the brain. All three had multiple secondary deposits elsewhere in the body and one had metastases to the clivus but without evidence of extension to the pituitary fossa. DI is uncommon in systemic cancers and anterior pituitary dysfunction much more so, due to the separate blood supply of the two lobes. Thickening of the stalk has not been found frequently in large autopsy series. In the clinical context of DI in a patient with a known primary tumour the loss of high signal from the posterior lobe and stalk thickening are indicative of infiltration by metastases. A pituitary mass or metastases to adjacent bones are not necessary for diagnosis.

    Title Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Parotid Gland Using the Stir Sequence.
    Date September 1992
    Journal Clinical Otolaryngology and Allied Sciences
    Excerpt

    The object of this study was to determine the efficiency of the short tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequence in the assessment of salivary disease. Sixteen patients with tumours either in or adjacent to the parotid gland were imaged using a 1.5T Philips Gyroscan, with a standard head coil. T1-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences were obtained in multiple planes and assessed independently by each of the authors. Positive fine needle aspiration cytology or histological proof of the nature of the imaged lesions was obtained for every patient. T1-weighted spin-echo images were most useful for visualizing anatomical structures and for identification of the facial nerve. All lesions were visible with T1-weighted images but were very much more conspicuous in the STIR sequences, for which a minimal lesion resolution of 6 mm was achieved. No contrast enhancement was required. It was not possible to determine the pathological nature of the lesion by scan appearance only. Our conclusion is that a combination of T1-weighted spin-echo and STIR sequences in the axial and coronal planes is the preferred protocol for salivary gland imaging.

    Title Dural Sinus Thrombosis. Diagnosis and Follow-up by Magnetic Resonance Angiography and Imaging.
    Date July 1991
    Journal Neuroradiology
    Excerpt

    Magnetic resonance imaging has been reported to have advantages over conventional angiography in the diagnosis of dural sinus thrombosis. A case report is presented describing the application of MR techniques including MR angiography, to diagnose and monitor therapy for dural sinus thrombosis.

    Title A Comparison of Ct and Mri in the Assessment of the Pituitary and Parasellar Region.
    Date May 1991
    Journal Clinical Radiology
    Excerpt

    We have carried out a prospective study to compare high resolution thin slice, contrast-enhanced, axial computed tomography (CT) with unenhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5T in the assessment of the pituitary and parasellar region. Forty patients with suspected pituitary disease presenting to an endocrine unit were studied. MRI was superior to CT for the identification of the posterior pituitary and pituitary stalk and was better at showing the cystic nature of tumours. Visualization of the optic chiasm and assessment of displacement of the optic chiasm and the carotid arteries were also better with MRI. CT was equally good at showing cavernous sinus displacement or invasion, sphenoid sinus invasion and erosion of the floor of the sella turcica and was the only technique able to show calcification of the gland. More focal abnormalities were seen in the pituitary gland with CT than with unenhanced MRI, but there was a higher false positive rate for microadenoma detection with CT. All the scans were interpreted separately by three observers, two radiologists and one clinician. The percentage agreement between the observers for the identification of pituitary and parasellar structures was better for MRI than for CT and the clinician in particular found interpretation of the MR images easier. MRI thus not only gives more information overall than CT but it is a more reliable technique between different observers for the assessment of the pituitary and parasellar region.

    Title Practical Considerations for Patient Investigation Using a High Field (1.5t) Magnetic Resonance System.
    Date January 1990
    Journal Radiography Today
    Title The Obstetric Care Information Act.
    Date September 1983
    Journal Congressional Record : Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress. United States. Congress
    Title Spectrum of Global Left Ventricular Responses to Supine Exercise. Limitation in the Use of Ejection Fraction in Identifying Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.
    Date February 1983
    Journal The American Journal of Cardiology
    Excerpt

    Left ventricular function was evaluated with rest and supine bicycle exercise-multigated blood pool scans in 53 patients who had previously undergone coronary angiography for evaluation of a chest pain syndrome. There were 21 normal patients (less than 25% stenosis in any coronary artery, left ventricular end-diastolic pressure less than or equal to 12 mm Hg, and normal left ventriculography) and 32 patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) (greater than 50% narrowing in 1 or more major coronary arteries). Thirty-two (60%) were receiving propranolol at the time of the study. The normal patient group had a significant increase in mean ejection fraction (EF) during exercise (+0.08 +/- 0.09), while the CAD group had no increase (0 +/- 0.11; p less than 0.05). Mean end-systolic volume decreased significantly in the normal group (-5 +/- 8 ml/m2) but demonstrated no significant change in the CAD group (1 +/- 12 ml/m2; p less than 0.05 compared with normal patients). There was no significant change in mean end-diastolic volume in either group. Mean ejection rate, mean peak systolic pressure/end-systolic volume ratio, and mean pulmonary blood volume ratio also differed in the normal versus CAD patients. Despite mean differences, there was considerable overlap in both groups of individual EF responses: 8 of 21 (38%) of the normal group did not have an increase in EF of 0.05 with exercise, while 15 of 32 (47%) of the CAD group did have an increase in EF of 0.05 with exercise. However, the addition of peak systolic pressure/end-systolic volume ratio and pulmonary blood volume (exercise/rest) ratio improved the sensitivity for detecting CAD from 53 to 84% without adversely affecting specificity. Thus, there is a wide spectrum of left ventricular EF responses to supine exercise. In our patient population, EF alone was an insensitive and nonspecific marker of CAD. The addition of other parameters of global left ventricular function, which may be generated using radionuclide angiography, helps distinguish patients with CAD from normal subjects.

    Title Doctors Organize to Prevent Nuclear War.
    Date February 1983
    Journal Congressional Record : Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress. United States. Congress
    Title No Medical Defense to a Nuclear Attack.
    Date January 1983
    Journal Congressional Record : Proceedings and Debates of the ... Congress. United States. Congress
    Title Heart Failure in Outpatients: a Randomized Trial of Digoxin Versus Placebo.
    Date May 1982
    Journal The New England Journal of Medicine
    Excerpt

    The view that digitalis clinically benefits patients with heart failure and sinus rhythm lacks support from a well-controlled study. Using a randomized, double-blind, crossover protocol, we compared the effects of oral digoxin and placebo on the clinical courses of 25 outpatients without atrial fibrillation. According to a clinicoradiographic scoring system, the severity of heart failure was reduced by digoxin in 14 patients; in nine of these 14, improvement was confirmed by repeated trials (five patients) or right-heart catheterization (four patients). The other 11 patients had no detectable improvement from digoxin. Patients who responded to digoxin had more chronic and more severe heart failure, greater left ventricular dilation and ejection-fraction depression, and a third heart sound. Multivariate analysis showed that the third heart sound was the strongest correlate of the response to digoxin (P less than 0.0001). These data suggest that long-term digoxin therapy is clinically beneficial in patients with heart failure unaccompanied by atrial fibrillation whose failure persists despite diuretic treatment and who have a third heart sound.

    Title Multiple-gated Blood Pool Imaging in Diagnosis of Left Ventricular Aneurysms.
    Date October 1981
    Journal British Medical Journal (clinical Research Ed.)
    Title Paradoxical Septal Motion.
    Date August 1981
    Journal Seminars in Nuclear Medicine
    Title Right Ventricular Function in Aortic and Mitral Valve Disease.
    Date July 1981
    Journal Chest
    Excerpt

    Radionuclide ventriculography of the right heart was performed in 56 patients within two weeks of cardiac catheterization using a gated first-pass technique. Thirteen patient served as normal controls, and 43 patients had severe aortic or mitral valve disease or both, 35 of whom subsequently underwent valve surgery. Right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) and the presence of central venous reflux was determined and related to catheterization findings. In normal patients, RVEF was 60 plus or minus 7 percent (mean plus or minus 1 SD). In patients with valvular disease, the RVEF was below the normal range in only 2/14 (14 per cent) when right ventricular peak systolic pressures were less than 50 mm Hg, compared with 16/29 (55 percent) with an RVEF below normal when right ventricular peak systolic pressures greater than 50 mm Hg (P less than .05). In contrast, there was no relation of right ventricular ejection fraction to ventricular filling pressure in valvular heart disease patients. There was no difference in early postoperative course in patients with normal or reduced ejection fraction. Central venous systolic reflux was not presented in normal patients, but was present in 3/12 (25 percent) and 22/25 (88 percent); P less than 0.1) of patients with right ventricular systolic pressures below and above 55 mm Hg, respectively, including all ten patients with documented tricuspid regurgitation. Radionuclide assessment of right ventricular function in patients with aortic or mitral valve disease or both provides information that cannot be inferred from right-sided pressure measurements.

    Title Early Changes in Left Ventricular Size and Function After Correction of Left Ventricular Volume Overload.
    Date June 1981
    Journal The American Journal of Cardiology
    Title Cardiac Nuclear Imaging: Principles, Instrumentation and Pitfalls.
    Date March 1981
    Journal The American Journal of Cardiology
    Excerpt

    The requirements for cardiac imaging with nuclear techniques are: (1) a radiolabeled tracer that is distributed in proportion to the function under investigation; (2) a collimator to allow photons arising only from specific areas of the heart to interact with the imaging device; (3) an imaging device to convert the gamma photon energy into an electrical signal that can be processed and displayed; and (4) a computer to record the information and permit quantification and optimal display of the data. One characteristic of nuclear imaging techniques is the requirement of averaging of a number of cardiac cycles to provide data for interpretation, whereas th information recorded with nuclear probes can be analyzed on a beat by beat basis. The data can be reviewed both visually and quantitatively. Semiautomatic methods of measuring ejection fraction, which correlate well with data from cardiac catheterization, have been in clinical use for several years. However, these techniques are not capable of correctly analyzing the data from all patients. Particular errors occur with gating, tracking the edge of the ventricle or in the selection of a background area, which may result in the calculation of an erroneous election fraction. In the future, short-lived radiopharmaceutical agents will result in a lower radiation burden to patients and higher quality studies in a shorter period of time, and tomographic techniques should provide new insights into the structure and function of the heart.

    Title Scintigraphic Evaluation of Left Ventricular Aneurysm.
    Date March 1981
    Journal The American Journal of Cardiology
    Excerpt

    Gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy is a noninvasive method to assess regional and global left ventricular function in the patient with suspected true or false left ventricular aneurysm after a myocardial infarction. The procedure is easy to perform and provides reproducible, high resolution images that can accurately distinguish from diffuse contractile abnormalities often present after myocardial infarction. An overall accuracy rate of 96 percent for detection of left ventricular aneurysm can be obtained with gated cardiac blood pool scintigraphy as compared with contrast left ventriculography. The procedure also permits assessment of functional reserve of the noninvolved myocardium and thus can provide valuable information on whether enough viable myocardium will remain after aneurysmectomy. The addition of thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy may aid in the separation of viable from scarred myocardium at the edge of the aneurysm. Both radionuclide techniques are well suited for screening the patient after infarction with persistent congestive heart failure, malignant arrhythmia or systemic emboli in whom a left ventricular aneurysm may have developed.

    Title Influence of Coronary Artery Disease on Pulmonary Uptake of Thallium-201.
    Date January 1981
    Journal The American Journal of Cardiology
    Excerpt

    An increased pulmonary thallium-201 concentration has been observed in exercise stress thallium perfusion imaging in patients with coronary artery disease. To understand the cause of this lung uptake, studies were performed in experimental animals and in patients undergoing stress thallium perfusion imaging. The extraction fraction of thallium-201 by the lungs was measured in a group of eight dogs using a dual isotope technique. Basal thallium-201 extraction fraction at rest was 0.09 +/- 0.009. After administration of isoproterenol, it decreased to 0.06 +/- 0.02 (difference not significant). After balloon obstruction of the left atrium (which increased mean left atrial pressure and pulmonary transit time) and after administration of acetylcholine as a bolus injection (which prolonged pulmonary transit time only) it increased to 0.19 +/- 0.02 (p < 0.01). Lung thallium-201 activity was measured in 86 patients who had undergone cardiac catheterization and stress-redistribution myocardial perfusion imaging. The initial/final lung activity ratio was 1.41 +/- 0.03 in patients with no significant coronary artery disease, 1.52 +/- 0.03 (difference not significant) in patients with single vessel coronary disease, 1.60 +/- 0.05 (p < 0.05) in those with two vessel disease and 1.59 +/- 0.05 (p < 0.05) in those with triple vessel disease. Quantitation of lung activity in 30 of these patients indicated that the increased ratio in patients with multivessel coronary artery disease was due to a transient absolute increase in the thallium-201 concentration immediately after maximal exercise. The data imply that increased pulmonary concentration of thallium-201 during exercise is a consequence of left ventricular failure.

    Title Right Atrial Enlargement--cardiac Imaging.
    Date September 1980
    Journal Seminars in Nuclear Medicine
    Title Of Linens and Laces--the Eighth Anniversary of the Gated Blood Pool Scan.
    Date April 1980
    Journal Seminars in Nuclear Medicine
    Excerpt

    Evaluation of ventricular performance is essential in the diagnosis and long-term management of patients with heart disease. This can be most easily performed clinically using simple tools. When more definitive objective assessment of cardiac function is indicated, the equilibrium gated blood pool study provides reliable angiographic evaluation of the heart. It will continue as a mainstay in the armamentarium of cardiology.

    Title Nuclear Medicine Applications to the Study of Coronary Artery Disease.
    Date May 1979
    Journal Texas Medicine
    Title Use of 99tcm-dmsa As a Static Renal Imaging Agent.
    Date December 1978
    Journal Contributions to Nephrology
    Excerpt

    The use of 99Tcm-labelled DMSA as a static renal imaging agent has been analyzed semi-quantitatively in 366 patients. Study with this agent proved to be of most value in patients with equivocal space-occupying lesions of the kidney, provided useful information in various destructive diseases of the kidney when used for determining divided renal function but was of little value in chronic renal failure. In 33 patients, the uptake of 99Tcm-DMSA at 3 h as a measure of divided renal function was compared with the uptake of 99Tcm-DTPA from 30 to 150 sec following injection and was found to correlate well. In a series of 7 dogs with induced unilateral renal impairment, divided function determined with 99Tcm-DMSA was found to correlate well with results obtained using 51Cr-EDTA.

    Title An Evaluation of the Use of 99tcm-dimercaptosuccinic Acid (dmsa) As a Static Renal Imaging Agent.
    Date October 1978
    Journal The British Journal of Radiology
    Excerpt

    The clinical value of 99Tcm-dimercaptosuccinic acid, utilized as a static renal imaging agent, has been analysed in 366 patients. It proved to be diagnostically most useful in space occupying lesions of the kidney when equivocal on IVU and provided useful additional information when used in the determination of divided renal function or the distribution of intrarenal function. Its use is contraindicated in the determination of divided renal function in obstructed kidneys because of accumulation of significant amounts of DMSA that are excreted by glomerular filtration. When DMSA uptake at three hours after injection is compared with 99Tcm-DPTA uptake from 90 to 150 seconds after bolus injection, there is a good correlation between the two methods of determination of divided renal function.

    Title The Appearances of Renal Transplant Lymphocoeles During Dynamic Renal Scintigraphy.
    Date June 1978
    Journal The British Journal of Radiology
    Excerpt

    Eight patients are described in whom transplant lymphocoeles were drained. All had 99Tcm-DTPA dynamic renal scintigrams performed pre-operatively; five showed features of obstruction. Photon deficient areas on the scintigrams and bladder deformities were of particular value in detecting lymphocoeles.

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