Browse Health
Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)
13 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
University of California at San Francisco (1997)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Dr. Amory was voted "Top Doctors" in Seattle Metropolitan Magazine
Associations
American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Amory is affiliated with 10 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Swedish Medical Center - Cherry Hill
    747 Broadway, Seattle, WA 98122
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • University Of Washington Medical Ctr
    1959 Ne Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Valley Medical Center
    400 S 43rd St, Renton, WA 98055
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Evergreen Healthcare
    12040 NE 128th St, Kirkland, WA 98034
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Overlake Hospital Medical Center
    1035 116th Ave NE, Bellevue, WA 98004
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Swedish Edmonds Hospital
    21601 76th Ave W, Edmonds, WA 98026
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Harborview Medical Center
    325 9th Ave, Seattle, WA 98104
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Swedish Medical Center - Ballard
    5300 Tallman Ave NW, Seattle, WA 98107
  • Swedish Hospital First Hill Campus
  • Stevens Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Amory has contributed to 3 publications.
    Title Increased Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha in Whole Blood During the Luteal Phase of Ovulatory Cycles.
    Date December 2004
    Journal The Journal of Reproductive Medicine
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether the fact that blood from premenopausal, ovulatory women shows a significant fluctuation in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) levels when tested randomly over time is related to the hormonal cycle. STUDY DESIGN: In this pilot study, whole blood was collected from 8 women during the follicular, ovulatory and midluteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Ovulation was confirmed by luteinizing hormone surge and mid-luteal progesterone levels. For each subject at each phase of the menstrual cycle, TNF-alpha levels were measured at baseline and after stimulation of whole blood with 10 microg/mL of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Supernatant was collected and assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. TNF-alpha levels were compared with the Wilcoxon matched pairs signed rank sum test. RESULTS: Whole blood unstimulated by LPS showed increasing TNF-alpha levels over the hormonal cycle, with significantly increased median levels during the luteal phase (903 pg/mL; range, 0-3707) as compared with the follicular phase (162 pg/mL; range, 0-656) (P = .03). Blood stimulated with LPS showed increased TNF-alpha levels overall but no association with cycle timing. CONCLUSION: TNF-alpha levels in unstimulated whole blood appear to be associated with menstrual cycle timing, with highest levels during the luteal phase. However, the lack of variation in TNF-alpha production after LPS stimulation suggests that experiments do not need to be timed with the menstrual cycle.

    Title Adverse Outcomes After Preterm Labor Are Associated with Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Polymorphism -863, but Not -308, in Mother-infant Pairs.
    Date December 2004
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Two single-base polymorphisms of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene (TNF-alpha) at positions -863 and -308 are associated with variation in production of TNF-alpha (TNF-alpha). TNF-alpha genotypes were tested for association with adverse outcomes in mother-infant pairs with preterm labor. STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed a cohort of 118 mother-infant pairs with preterm labor before 34 weeks' gestation. Polymerase chain reaction was used on extracted deoxyribonucleic acid for polymorphism assay. Outcomes included amniotic fluid TNF-alpha concentration, histologic chorioamnionitis, delivery gestational age, and composite neonatal morbidity. Statistical significance was determined by chi 2 and Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. RESULTS: Mothers homozygous for the -863 polymorphism (AA) had significantly earlier deliveries ( P = .02), more chorioamnionitis ( P = .03), and greater composite neonatal morbidity ( P = .03). Neither maternal nor fetal carriage of the -308 polymorphism was associated with adverse outcome. CONCLUSION: In women with preterm labor before 34 weeks' gestation, maternal homozygous carriage of the -863 polymorphism may be associated with preterm delivery and adverse neonatal outcome.

    Title Increased Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha Production After Lipopolysaccharide Stimulation of Whole Blood in Patients with Previous Preterm Delivery Complicated by Intra-amniotic Infection or Inflammation.
    Date December 2001
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To compare cytokine production after lipopolysaccharide stimulation of whole blood from women who were delivered of infants at term compared with women who were delivered of preterm infants with intra-amniotic evidence of infection or inflammation. STUDY DESIGN: Whole blood samples from 12 women who were not pregnant and who had previously had preterm deliveries before 32 weeks complicated by intra-amniotic infection or inflammation and samples from 12 age- and race-matched control subjects were stimulated with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 levels were quantified at 6 hours and interleukin-10 at 24 hours by enzyme immunoassay. Results were compared with use of the Wilcoxon rank sum test. RESULTS: Tumor necrosis factor-alpha production was significantly higher in whole blood from women with histories of a preterm birth and intra-amniotic infection or inflammation (11,243 +/- 1030 pg/mL [mean +/- SEM]) compared with control subjects (3649 +/- 349 pg/mL) at a lipopolysaccharide concentration of 1 microg/mL (P =.002). There were no significant differences in interleukin-6 or interleukin-10 production. CONCLUSION: Women with previous early preterm deliveries who had evidence of intra-amniotic infection or inflammation had significantly higher tumor necrosis factor-alpha production after lipopolysaccharide stimulation of whole blood compared with women with previous term deliveries.

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