Plastic Surgeons, Surgical Specialist
11 years of experience

Accepting new patients
Medical Center
3901 Beaubien St
Detroit, MI 48201
313-745-0247
Locations and availability (1)

Education ?

Medical School
University Of Manitoba Faculty Of Medicine (1999)
Foreign school

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American College of Surgeons
American Society of Plastic Surgeons

Affiliations ?

Dr. Arneja is affiliated with 7 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • DMC - Sinai-Grace Hospital
    6071 W Outer Dr, Detroit, MI 48235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Harper University Hospital
    3990 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Detroit Receiving Hospital & University Health Center
    4201 Saint Antoine St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Grace Hospital
  • Children's Hospital of Michigan
    3901 Beaubien St, Detroit, MI 48201
  • Harper University Hospital & Hutzel Women's Hospital
  • Hutzel Women's Hospital
    3980 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Arneja has contributed to 15 publications.
    Title Management of Complicated Facial Hemangiomas with Beta-blocker (propranolol) Therapy.
    Date October 2010
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Title Through-and-through Dissection of the Soft Palate for High Pharyngeal Flap Inset: a New Technique for the Treatment of Velopharyngeal Incompetence in Velocardiofacial Syndrome.
    Date September 2008
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Patients with velocardiofacial syndrome often present with refractory velopharyngeal incompetence. Whereas the high wide pharyngeal flap has been advocated for these patients, poor visualization makes high inset of the flap technically difficult. We present a consecutive series of patients with velocardiofacial syndrome and severe velopharyngeal incompetence treated with high inset pharyngeal flap achieved by through-and-through dissection of the soft palate. METHODS: All patients with velocardiofacial syndrome in whom secondary surgical management was recommended for treatment of severe velopharyngeal incompetence over the last 7 years were treated with a high inset pharyngeal flap achieved by through-and-through dissection of the soft palate (to be described). All patients had nasendoscopy and videofluoroscopy preoperatively and underwent perceptual speech assessment preoperatively and at least 12 months postoperatively. RESULTS: Eight patients met the inclusion criteria with a mean age at presentation of 7 years, 3 months. No patient had a history of cleft palate. All patients had minimal lateral pharyngeal wall motion and a medium to large velopharyngeal gap (>6 mm). Velopharyngeal incompetence, as measured by perceptual speech score, improved from a mean of 10.3 (range, 9 to 12 on a maximum scale of 13) to a mean of 1.9 (range, 0 to 4), achieving velopharyngeal competence (p < 0.01) without nasal airway obstruction in any patient. CONCLUSIONS: The present report demonstrates restoration of velopharyngeal competence in a consecutive series of patients with velocardiofacial syndrome who presented with severe velopharyngeal incompetence. We attribute this outcome to the development of a reliable technique for high inset of the pharyngeal flap using through-and-through dissection of the soft palate, enabling direct visualization of flap placement.

    Title Vascular Malformations.
    Date April 2008
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand the nomenclature and classification system of vascular malformations. 2. Evaluate these patients diagnostically. 3. Outline the surgical and nonsurgical options for treating these lesions. SUMMARY: Vascular anomalies can be classified into two unique groups-hemangiomas and vascular malformations-based on their endothelial properties. The present review focuses on vascular malformations rather than hemangiomas. The authors address capillary malformations, lymphatic malformations, venous malformations, and arteriovenous malformations. Diagnostic and therapeutic modalities are discussed with relevant case examples. A MEDLINE search was performed to gather all pertinent references. The physician treating these challenging lesions should ideally use a multidisciplinary team-based approach with multispecialty experience in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities for the management of vascular malformations.

    Title Treatment of Recurrent Earlobe Keloids with Surgery and High-dose-rate Brachytherapy.
    Date February 2008
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Title Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevi.
    Date July 2007
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES: After studying this article, the participant should be able to: 1. Define what is meant by a giant congenital melanocytic nevus and understand its histologic properties. 2. Know the natural history and potential complications associated with a giant congenital melanocytic nevus. 3. Outline the nonsurgical and surgical options available to treat a giant congenital melanocytic nevus. BACKGROUND: Giant congenital melanocytic nevi are rare lesions with a propensity to degenerate to malignant melanoma. Certain lesions also may be associated with neurocutaneous melanosis, which can on occasion be symptomatic. Appropriate investigations include a screening magnetic resonance imaging scan, neurologic evaluation, and serial clinical observations for the development of cutaneous melanoma. A variety of nonsurgical and surgical options are possible for the treatment of giant congenital melanocytic nevi. METHODS: A MEDLINE search was performed to gather all pertinent articles from 1955 to 2005. RESULTS: Giant congenital melanocytic nevi are a difficult diagnostic and reconstructive challenge, requiring careful preoperative evaluation, staged surgical excision, and lifelong patient monitoring and follow-up. With proper treatment, patients can expect a decreased risk of melanoma, with the possibility for early detection and cure of melanoma, amelioration of symptoms, improved aesthetics and psychosocial sequelae, and maintenance of function. CONCLUSION: The plastic surgeon treating these challenging lesions must have a solid working knowledge of the disease's histology, its natural history and complications, and the options for treatment.

    Title Management of the Black Hole in Velopharyngeal Incompetence: Combined Use of a Furlow Palatoplasty and Sphincter Pharyngoplasty.
    Date May 2007
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Patients with velopharyngeal incompetence may have a combination of a large velopharyngeal gap and poor lateral wall motion on phonation, simulating a "black hole" on nasendoscopy. Pharyngeal flaps for treatment of velopharyngeal incompetence in these patients are of questionable efficacy, because poor lateral wall motion necessitates such a wide flap that nasal airway obstruction is likely. METHODS: Thirteen patients with velopharyngeal incompetence were managed between 1994 and 2003 with a combined Furlow palatoplasty and sphincter pharyngoplasty by a single surgeon. A diagnosis of velopharyngeal incompetence was established by means of perceptual speech evaluation performed by a trained speech pathologist using a standardized speech/voice rating scale (0 to 13); scores of 4 or higher indicated an incompetent velopharyngeal valving mechanism. Surgical inclusion criteria were a large velopharyngeal gap (> or =7 mm) and poor lateral wall motion (1 or 2 of 5, with 3 being rated as average) measured by multiview videofluoroscopy and nasendoscopy. RESULTS: The mean preoperative score on the speech and voice rating scale was 10.5 (range, 4 to 13), with a mean postoperative score of 1.9 (range, 0 to 8) following Furlow palatoplasty and sphincter pharyngoplasty in 13 patients. Two patients required an additional surgical procedure to achieve complete correction of velopharyngeal incompetence without nasal airway obstruction, to achieve a final mean score of 0.8 (range, 0 to 2) among the 12 patients who completed surgical management, achieving a highly significant reduction in nasality (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with velopharyngeal incompetence who have a black hole on nasendoscopy consisting of a large velopharyngeal gap and poor lateral wall motion are at high risk for recurrent velopharyngeal incompetence or nasal airway obstruction following surgical management. Initial treatment with a Furlow palatoplasty and sphincter pharyngoplasty has a high rate of success in these patients and does not preclude further surgical correction if needed, with minimal risk of nasal airway compromise.

    Title Axillary Hyperhidrosis: a 5-year Review of Treatment Efficacy and Recurrence Rates Using a New Arthroscopic Shaver Technique.
    Date February 2007
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Axillary hyperhidrosis is a chronic condition characterized by excess axillary perspiration. This results in considerable patient morbidity, with no consistently efficacious medical or surgical treatment method described in the literature. METHODS: All cases of axillary hyperhidrosis over a 5-year period were reviewed retrospectively. Data were gathered by a chart review and telephone interview. Inclusion criteria included primary hyperhidrosis, failed conservative therapy, no prior surgical therapy, surgical management using a new arthroscopic shaver technique (R.L.B.-S.), and 6 months of postoperative follow-up. The technique used was consistent between surgeons. Sweating severity was assessed using a subjective numerical rating scale ranging from 1 to 10. Patient demographics, symptom history, results, and complications were analyzed. RESULTS: Average follow-up for 50 patients meeting the inclusion criteria was 28 months. The subjective severity scale demonstrated severity of 9.8 of 10 preoperatively and 2.3 of 10 postoperatively. Three patients (6 percent) reported mild recurrence of symptoms (4.6 of 10), which was not severe enough to seek further treatment. The average follow-up of those patients was 18.5 months. An overall subjective satisfaction of 96 percent was found, with a treatment success rate of 94 percent. Complications were minimal and self-limiting. The average time away from employment was 3.9 days and the average surgical operating room time was 46 minutes. CONCLUSIONS: The authors' new arthroscopic shaver technique is efficacious, with no significant morbidity, a 96 percent satisfaction rate, a subjectively measured 75 percent reduction of sweat, and a recurrence rate of only 6 percent. For cases of primary hyperhidrosis affecting the axilla not amenable to conservative treatment, the authors recommend an arthroscopic shaver technique as the first-line treatment of choice.

    Title An Approach to the Management of Common Vascular Malformations of the Trunk.
    Date January 2007
    Journal The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
    Excerpt

    Vascular anomalies can be classified into two unique groups, hemangiomas and vascular malformations, based on their endothelial properties. The present review will focus on the four most common vascular malformations of the trunk presenting to the Plastic Surgeon: capillary malformations, lymphatic malformations, venous malformations, and arterovenous malformations. We define the trunk as chest, abdomen and back; the principles of breast reconstruction will not be discussed as they have been extensively covered in other publications. Diagnostic and therapeutic modalities will be discussed with pertinent case examples.

    Title Aesthetic and Reconstructive Brow Lift: Current Techniques, Indications, and Applications.
    Date January 2006
    Journal Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Title Giant Congenital Melanocytic Nevi of the Trunk and an Algorithm for Treatment.
    Date November 2005
    Journal The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
    Excerpt

    Giant congenital melanocytic nevi (CMN) are rare, congenital, disfiguring lesions with a risk of degeneration to malignant melanoma. Giant CMN are associated with an increased risk of malignant degeneration. In a minority of cases, patients with giant CMN may have associated neurocutaneous melanosis with leptomeningeal involvement. Giant CMN of the trunk pose difficult diagnostic and reconstructive problems requiring complex multistage treatment. For high-risk cases, diagnostic evaluation in the form of neuro-imaging is an essential component of the planning phase. Although nonsurgical options for the treatment of giant CMN have been advocated, these modalities may decrease the burden of nevus cells but do not result in complete removal of these cells. The ability to monitor nevus cells that remain after nonsurgical management of giant CMN remains questionable. These nonsurgical options include dermabrasion, laser ablation, and chemical peel. In contrast, direct excision of the nevus is the mainstay of treatment of nonsurgical management of giant CMN. There are numerous surgical options to resurface the resultant cutaneous defect after excision of the nevus. The simplest of these options consists of serial excision and direct closure of the defect in stages. However, if the defect cannot be closed by direct cutaneous advancement, other options for wound resurfacing include split- or full-thickness skin graft, tissue expansion, and free tissue transfer. Tissue expansion should be viewed as a category of treatment options because expanders can be used to create an expanded full-thickness skin graft, local expanded flaps adjacent to the lesion, or expansion of a free tissue donor site. Given the diversity of reconstructive options that use tissue expansion, these techniques have evolved as the primary treatment method for giant CMN of the trunk. The authors outline an approach to the evaluation of giant CMN of the trunk, review the risks of melanoma and of neurocutaneous melanosis, describe their preferred treatment regimen, and offer a treatment algorithm for giant CMN of the trunk.

    Title Effect of Different Cultural Conditions on the Chemical Composition of Lipids of Fusarium Oxysporum.
    Date February 1979
    Journal Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
    Title Lipid Metabolism in Fusarium Oxysporum.
    Date February 1979
    Journal Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
    Title Axillary Osmidrosis in Apert Syndrome: Management with an Arthroscopic Shaver Technique.
    Date
    Journal The Journal of Craniofacial Surgery
    Excerpt

    Apert syndrome is a congenital condition characterized by craniosynostosis, syndactyly, and maxillary hypoplasia. Previous authors have outlined the management of craniofacial and extremity anomalies associated with this syndrome; however, there is a paucity of literature regarding the treatment of the cutaneous manifestations of Apert syndrome. Axillary osmidrosis, a chronic skin condition characterized by an excessive, axillary malodor resulting from apocrine gland dysfunction, can be particularly severe in patients with Apert syndrome. Herein, we describe a pediatric patient with Apert syndrome and severe axillary osmidrosis managed by an arthroscopic shaver technique of axillary glandular debridement and aspiration.

    Title Management of Fulminant Dissecting Cellulitis of the Scalp in the Pediatric Population: Case Report and Literature Review.
    Date
    Journal The Canadian Journal of Plastic Surgery = Journal Canadien De Chirurgie Plastique
    Excerpt

    A case of fulminant dissecting cellulitis of the scalp in a fifteen-year-old African American male is reported. The presentation was refractory to standard medical treatment such that treatment required radical subgaleal excision of the entire hair-bearing scalp. Reconstruction was in the form of split-thickness skin grafting at the level of the pericranium following several days of vacuum-assisted closure dressing to promote an acceptable wound bed for skin grafting and to ensure appropriate clearance of infection. Numerous nonsurgical modalities have been described for the treatment of dissecting cellulitis of the scalp, with surgical intervention reserved for patients refractory to medical treatment. The present paper reports a fulminant form of the disease in an atypical age of presentation, adolescence. The pathophysiology, etiology, natural history, complications and treatment options for dissecting cellulitis of the scalp are reviewed, and the authors suggest this method of treatment to be efficacious for severe presentations refractory to medical therapy.

    Title Nora's Lesion: Case Report and Literature Review of a Bizarre Parosteal Osteochondromatous Proliferation of a Small Finger.
    Date
    Journal The Canadian Journal of Plastic Surgery = Journal Canadien De Chirurgie Plastique
    Excerpt

    A case of a left small finger tumour that was diagnosed on histopathological review as Nora's lesion (bizarre parosteal osteochondromatous proliferation) is reported. There have been fewer than 150 cases reported in the literature to date and its pathophysiology is yet to be defined. Due to its rare presentation, Nora's lesion can easily go unrecognized and therefore inappropriately managed.


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