Overall Review

3.6
  • 57 patient ratings
  • 27 comments

Last 12 months:

3.5 (-0.1)

27 Patient Reviews

  • Highly Satisfied
    58%
  • Satisfied
    7%
  • Neutral
    2%
  • Dissatisfied
    7%
  • Highly Dissatisfied
    26%
  • Easy Appointments
  • Promptness
  • Friendly Staff
  • Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
  • Bedside Manner
  • Spends Time With Patients
  • Appropriate Followup
  • Wait Time 42.2 minutes

Showing 1 - 12 reviews

5.0 of 5
November 22nd, 2016
This guy knows his stuff
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
I found this guy just in time, he helped me improve my lifestyle with nutrition. KETOSIS... reaching it at a whole new level. Where has this doc been my whole life, I'm a body builder so nutrition is extremely important. I plan to make him my Doctor, and personal trainer if he wouldn't mind.
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5.0 of 5
November 22nd, 2016
Wait time
40 minutes
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
The staff is amazing very friendly, kept me posted about the wait time and assured me I would get adequate time with the doctor. Witnessed an employee being released from the office on November 1, 2016 that person was very unprofessional, pretty sure the office is better off.
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5.0 of 5
November 22nd, 2016
Amazing and Knowledgable
Wait time
25 minutes
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
This doctor is who I have prayed for, he is smart, he wants to get to the root of your health problems. He believes in healing the body instead of putting a bandaid on it. He had me in remission of my health problems in 6 months just by putting me on supplements and changing my diet. I strongly recommend this doctor if you want to get true healing the natural way without poisoning your body with drugs that affect other organs and create new problems.
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1.0 of 5
November 1st, 2016
His mind is going
Wait time
56 minutes
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
by Sick and Tired of Being Sick on Apr 27th, 2010 When I first started seeing Dr. Sebring his patient base was smaller and he remembered things about my case and spent adequate time discussing them with me. Now, he's rushed, distracted and I've waited just under two hours for him before (while hearing him chatting with the office staff right outside the door to my room about non-medical subjects).I have never once gotten a confirmation call on an appointment or had them call me with test results. It is usually a week or longer (sometimes not at all) that they take to return your calls, and the prices they charge are outrageous. (I had an ear wash out with hydrogen peroxide that insurance didn't cover come to me as a $85 bill)I have been mis-scheduled (and told it was my fault, quite rudely, though I very clearly had the date correctly, as I made the appointment the day before.), overcharged (and still not refunded after a year of asking) and the Doctor never has any memory of my case, even when I was visiting him every couple of weeks.I appreciate his desire to implement non-traditional solutions and approach things in a more natural way, but when I have to push for tests he should have suggested, and don't get a call back when the results were dangerous levels....something's wrong.I'll be looking for a new doctor.
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1.0 of 5
November 1st, 2016
Poor Treatment
Wait time
56 minutes
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
Don't waste your time with Dr. Sebring. I've heard he used to be a great doctor, but now the waits are 2 hours, and when he finally sees you, he'll talk about government politics and repeat the same stories of past patients over and over. He seems distracted and not able to focus. Seems his answer for all health problems is the paleo diet, so if you're sick just start eating the paleo diet and don't bother seeing this docto
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1.0 of 5
November 1st, 2016
Lost his mind
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
Sebring has been disciplined four times by the Texas Medical Board and is facing new charges: In 2002, he entered into in informal settlement agreement in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $5,000 to settle a charge that he had failed to provide adequate informed consent or maintain an adequate record of his care for a patient whom he had diagnosed with "Wilson's Syndrome." [6] Wilson's syndrome—also called Wilson's temperature syndrome—is not recognized as valid by the scientific community. Its originator, E. Denis Wilson, M.D., lost his Florida medical license in the early 1990s for treating patients with unnecessary and inappropriate dosages of thyroid hormone [7]. In 2005, Sebring signed a consent order in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $500 for advertising that he was board-certified in "anti-aging medicine." This violated a board rule because the American Board of Anti-Aging Medicine, which is not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties, does not meet Texas standards for certifying boards [8]. In 2010, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $1,000 for "false and/or misleading advertising." The order stated that in 2009, in the Austin Monthly magazine, Sebring had advertised unsupported and unproven treatment modalities that included "bio-identical hormone therapy, non-surgical urinary leakage repair, reverse aging skin, and proven natural solutions for heart disease, thyroid, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, which cannot be readily verified and/or proven scientifically." The board also objected to a claim that he was "certified by the Texas Medical Board in Family Medicine," because the board provides no such certification [9]. In 2014, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $3,000 and requiring Sebring to complete certain continuing education course and to pass the board's medical jurisprudence examination. The order stated that he had made false statements in a local publication that the board considered advertising that (a) the cause of breast cancer is the bra, (b) the majority of patients die of chemotherapy not cancer, (c) chronic disease(s) in humans began with the introduction of grains in the diet, and (d) vitamin C is considerably more effective than most chemotherapy drugs at ridding the body of cancer [10]. In 2016, Sebring was charged with violating the standard of care in his management of a patient who had sought help for depression and other problems. The board's complaint charges that Sebring had failed to perform a full history and physical exam, failed to establish evidence-based diagnoses, failed to obtain proper informed consent, and prescribed non-therapeutically [11].
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1.0 of 5
November 1st, 2016
White Trash girlfriend works in Paleo
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
Sebring has been disciplined four times by the Texas Medical Board and is facing new charges: In 2002, he entered into in informal settlement agreement in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $5,000 to settle a charge that he had failed to provide adequate informed consent or maintain an adequate record of his care for a patient whom he had diagnosed with "Wilson's Syndrome." [6] Wilson's syndrome—also called Wilson's temperature syndrome—is not recognized as valid by the scientific community. Its originator, E. Denis Wilson, M.D., lost his Florida medical license in the early 1990s for treating patients with unnecessary and inappropriate dosages of thyroid hormone [7]. In 2005, Sebring signed a consent order in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $500 for advertising that he was board-certified in "anti-aging medicine." This violated a board rule because the American Board of Anti-Aging Medicine, which is not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties, does not meet Texas standards for certifying boards [8]. In 2010, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $1,000 for "false and/or misleading advertising." The order stated that in 2009, in the Austin Monthly magazine, Sebring had advertised unsupported and unproven treatment modalities that included "bio-identical hormone therapy, non-surgical urinary leakage repair, reverse aging skin, and proven natural solutions for heart disease, thyroid, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, which cannot be readily verified and/or proven scientifically." The board also objected to a claim that he was "certified by the Texas Medical Board in Family Medicine," because the board provides no such certification [9]. In 2014, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $3,000 and requiring Sebring to complete certain continuing education course and to pass the board's medical jurisprudence examination. The order stated that he had made false statements in a local publication that the board considered advertising that (a) the cause of breast cancer is the bra, (b) the majority of patients die of chemotherapy not cancer, (c) chronic disease(s) in humans began with the introduction of grains in the diet, and (d) vitamin C is considerably more effective than most chemotherapy drugs at ridding the body of cancer [10]. In 2016, Sebring was charged with violating the standard of care in his management of a patient who had sought help for depression and other problems. The board's complaint charges that Sebring had failed to perform a full history and physical exam, failed to establish evidence-based diagnoses, failed to obtain proper informed consent, and prescribed non-therapeutically [11].
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1.0 of 5
November 1st, 2016
Washed up , 62 year old, 4 marriages, sleeps with his staff
Sebring has been disciplined four times by the Texas Medical Board and is facing new charges: In 2002, he entered into in informal settlement agreement in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $5,000 to settle a charge that he had failed to provide adequate informed consent or maintain an adequate record of his care for a patient whom he had diagnosed with "Wilson's Syndrome." [6] Wilson's syndrome—also called Wilson's temperature syndrome—is not recognized as valid by the scientific community. Its originator, E. Denis Wilson, M.D., lost his Florida medical license in the early 1990s for treating patients with unnecessary and inappropriate dosages of thyroid hormone [7]. In 2005, Sebring signed a consent order in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $500 for advertising that he was board-certified in "anti-aging medicine." This violated a board rule because the American Board of Anti-Aging Medicine, which is not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties, does not meet Texas standards for certifying boards [8]. In 2010, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $1,000 for "false and/or misleading advertising." The order stated that in 2009, in the Austin Monthly magazine, Sebring had advertised unsupported and unproven treatment modalities that included "bio-identical hormone therapy, non-surgical urinary leakage repair, reverse aging skin, and proven natural solutions for heart disease, thyroid, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, which cannot be readily verified and/or proven scientifically." The board also objected to a claim that he was "certified by the Texas Medical Board in Family Medicine," because the board provides no such certification [9]. In 2014, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $3,000 and requiring Sebring to complete certain continuing education course and to pass the board's medical jurisprudence examination. The order stated that he had made false statements in a local publication that the board considered advertising that (a) the cause of breast cancer is the bra, (b) the majority of patients die of chemotherapy not cancer, (c) chronic disease(s) in humans began with the introduction of grains in the diet, and (d) vitamin C is considerably more effective than most chemotherapy drugs at ridding the body of cancer [10]. In 2016, Sebring was charged with violating the standard of care in his management of a patient who had sought help for depression and other problems. The board's complaint charges that Sebring had failed to perform a full history and physical exam, failed to establish evidence-based diagnoses, failed to obtain proper informed consent, and prescribed non-therapeutically [11].
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1.0 of 5
November 1st, 2016
Waite for hours
Sebring has been disciplined four times by the Texas Medical Board and is facing new charges: In 2002, he entered into in informal settlement agreement in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $5,000 to settle a charge that he had failed to provide adequate informed consent or maintain an adequate record of his care for a patient whom he had diagnosed with "Wilson's Syndrome." [6] Wilson's syndrome—also called Wilson's temperature syndrome—is not recognized as valid by the scientific community. Its originator, E. Denis Wilson, M.D., lost his Florida medical license in the early 1990s for treating patients with unnecessary and inappropriate dosages of thyroid hormone [7]. In 2005, Sebring signed a consent order in which he agreed to pay an administrative penalty of $500 for advertising that he was board-certified in "anti-aging medicine." This violated a board rule because the American Board of Anti-Aging Medicine, which is not recognized by the American Board of Medical Specialties, does not meet Texas standards for certifying boards [8]. In 2010, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $1,000 for "false and/or misleading advertising." The order stated that in 2009, in the Austin Monthly magazine, Sebring had advertised unsupported and unproven treatment modalities that included "bio-identical hormone therapy, non-surgical urinary leakage repair, reverse aging skin, and proven natural solutions for heart disease, thyroid, diabetes, and metabolic syndrome, which cannot be readily verified and/or proven scientifically." The board also objected to a claim that he was "certified by the Texas Medical Board in Family Medicine," because the board provides no such certification [9]. In 2014, the board issued an order imposing an administrative penalty of $3,000 and requiring Sebring to complete certain continuing education course and to pass the board's medical jurisprudence examination. The order stated that he had made false statements in a local publication that the board considered advertising that (a) the cause of breast cancer is the bra, (b) the majority of patients die of chemotherapy not cancer, (c) chronic disease(s) in humans began with the introduction of grains in the diet, and (d) vitamin C is considerably more effective than most chemotherapy drugs at ridding the body of cancer [10]. In 2016, Sebring was charged with violating the standard of care in his management of a patient who had sought help for depression and other problems. The board's complaint charges that Sebring had failed to perform a full history and physical exam, failed to establish evidence-based diagnoses, failed to obtain proper informed consent, and prescribed non-therapeutically [11].
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5.0 of 5
October 27th, 2016
A Thorough and Knowledgable Doctor
Wait time
20 minutes
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
I would highly recommend Dr. Sebring to any family or friends. I recommend calling in advance to set an appointment, since his schedule is quite busy, but he's worth the wait! What I really liked about Dr. Sebring is that he not only did a thorough examination, unlike a lot of doctors who are in and out in 3 minutes... He took his time to answer my questions, especially when it came to my diet. I've been struggling with hypertension and weight gain, and he gave me some great resources on how I can lose weight by adjusting my diet and lifestyle. I've decided to make Dr. Sebring my primary care physician - and am grateful for him and his staff.
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5.0 of 5
September 19th, 2016
Great, well rounded clinic!
Wait time
20 minutes
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
Visited Dr. Lane Sebring's office in Wimberley over the summer for an early diagnosis of cardio vascular disease. Started treatment the same day! I live in Texas and will be regularly commuting and following through with phone calls with their team. Can't say enough great things about Dr. Lane Sebring's clinic!
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5.0 of 5
August 17th, 2016
Great for families
Wait time
15 minutes
Easy Appointment
Promptness
Friendly Staff
Fair and Accurate Diagnosis
Spends Time with Patients
Appropriate Follow-up
I took my family to Dr Lane Sebring after wanting to take control of my family's health and put us all on a better path to health. My wife and I both need to lose the weight and we dont want to set a bad example for our kids (3 and 5 yrs old) as they grow up. He set us up on a Paleo diet plan and a kid friendly version for our young ones. Dr Lane Sebring's service is highly recommended. Just set up an appointment time in advance with their front office so you don't have to wait too long.
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