Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)
17 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Northside Hospital
1000 Johnson Ferry Rd
Atlanta, GA 30342
404-851-8988
Locations and availability (8)

Education ?

Medical School Score
Creighton University (1993)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice Award (2013)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2013)
Associations
American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Matsumoto is affiliated with 12 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Wellstar Kennestone Hospital
    PO Box 1208, Marietta, GA 30061
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Northside Forsyth Hospital
    1200 Northside Forsyth Dr, Cumming, GA 30041
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Piedmont Hospital
    1968 Peachtree Rd NW, Atlanta, GA 30309
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Henry Medical Center Inc
    1133 Eagles Landing Pkwy, Stockbridge, GA 30281
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Northside Hospital
    1000 Johnson Ferry Rd, Atlanta, GA 30342
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Northside Hospital Atlanta, Northside Hospital Forsyth
  • Presbyterian Hospital Of Dallas
  • Richardson Regional
  • Presbyterian Hospital Of Plano
  • Piedmont Newnan Hospital
    60 Hospital Rd, Newnan, GA 30263
  • Medical Center Of Plano
  • Kennestone Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Matsumoto has contributed to 5 publications.
    Title Prolonged Hypoxia Upregulates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Messenger Rna Expression in Ovine Fetal Membranes and Placenta.
    Date March 2002
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: In ovine fetuses, 4 days of hypoxia resulted in a large increase in urine flow, without the development of polyhydramnios, which suggests that intramembranous absorption of the amniotic fluid was enhanced. Because vascular endothelial growth factor is speculated to be a regulator of intramembranous absorption through increases of membrane vascularity and fluid transport, we hypothesized that hypoxia upregulated vascular endothelial growth factor gene expression in the fetal membranes. STUDY DESIGN: Five near-term ovine fetuses that were subjected to 4 days of hypoxia and 5 age-matched time controls were studied. On day 4, the amnion, chorion, and placenta were collected for cellular localization and quantification of vascular endothelial growth factor messenger RNA and for the determination of vascular endothelial growth factor molecular forms that were expressed. The data were analyzed statistically with the use of t tests and 2-factor analyses of variance. RESULTS: Vascular endothelial growth factor messenger RNA was expressed in the fetal membranes localized to the amniotic epithelium and chorionic cytotrophoblast, and to the villous cytotrophoblast of the placenta. In hypoxic fetuses, vascular endothelial growth factor messenger RNA levels in these cell layers were significantly increased compared with the controls. Five vascular endothelial growth factor molecular forms were identified with vascular endothelial growth factor(164) being the most abundant form expressed. The pattern of expression of the forms was not altered by hypoxia. CONCLUSION: In the near-term ovine fetus, hypoxia induced vascular endothelial growth factor messenger RNA expression in the amnion, chorion, and placenta. This was associated with an increase in intramembranous absorption of amniotic fluid. We speculate that the increased intramembranous absorption was mediated by a vascular endothelial growth factor-induced increase in the transport of amniotic fluid into the fetal membranes.

    Title Fetal Esophageal Ligation Induces Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Messenger Ribonucleic Acid in Fetal Membranes.
    Date June 2001
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Obstruction of the fetal esophagus does not always produce the expected polyhydramnios. This is because of increased intramembranous absorption of amniotic fluid into the fetal circulation. A possible mediator for this increased absorption is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). The present objective was to explore whether VEGF gene expression and action would be induced in fetal membranes and placentas of ovine fetuses after esophageal ligation. STUDY DESIGN: Five late-gestation fetal sheep underwent esophageal ligation and 5 served as control animals. On postoperative day 9, amnion, chorion, and placenta were collected for cellular localization and quantitation of VEGF messenger ribonucleic acid by in situ hybridization and Northern blot analysis. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to identify the VEGF molecular forms. Immunostaining with Ki-67 antibody was used to determine the proliferation of vascular endothelium in the fetal membranes and placentas. RESULTS: VEGF messenger ribonucleic acid was localized in amniotic epithelium, chorionic cytotrophoblast, and cytotrophoblast of the placenta. VEGF164 was the major transcript expressed in these tissues. The abundance of VEGF messenger ribonucleic acid in the amnion and chorion, but not in the placenta, was significantly increased in the ligated fetuses in comparison with the control fetuses. The proliferation of the intramembranous blood vessel endothelium was greater in the ligated fetuses than in the control fetuses. CONCLUSION: The levels of VEGF messenger ribonucleic acid and the proliferation of vascular endothelium in the amnion and chorion increased after fetal esophageal ligation. This provides a possible mechanism for the enhanced intramembranous absorption of amniotic fluid through increased vascularity and permeability of the fetal membranes, thus ameliorating the development of polyhydramnios. We speculate that the signal(s) that mediate the increase in VEGF expression is present in either the fetal urine or the fetal lung secretions, or both.

    Title Increased Urinary Flow Without Development of Polyhydramnios in Response to Prolonged Hypoxia in the Ovine Fetus.
    Date May 2001
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: In the ovine fetus subjected to 24 hours of hypoxia, urinary flow is normal within a few hours from the onset of hypoxia and there is a maintained inhibition of swallowing. We hypothesized that 4 days of fetal hypoxia would lead to polyhydramnios. STUDY DESIGN: Five late-gestation fetal sheep were subjected to hypoxia for 4 days and 7 other late-gestation fetal sheep served as time control animals. Fetal hypoxia was produced on postsurgical days 5 through 9 by continuous intratracheal nitrogen insufflation to the ewe. On days 3, 5, 7, and 9 after surgery, amniotic fluid volume, fetal urinary flow rate, and the compositions of maternal and fetal blood, amniotic fluid, and fetal urine were measured. A 3-factor analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: During the period of experimental hypoxia the mean (+/-SE) fetal PaO(2) was 16.0 +/- 0.6 mm Hg, versus 21.2 +/- 0.7 mm Hg in control sheep (P <.001). Fetal hypoxia was associated with increased urinary flow on days 7 and 9, averaging 1410 +/- 310 and 2101 +/- 345 mL/d, respectively, versus 585 +/- 92 and 699 +/- 78 mL/d, respectively, in control animals (P <.001). Amniotic fluid volume was unchanged with time and averaged 960 +/- 159 mL in hypoxic fetuses on postsurgical days 7 through 9 and 851 +/- 130 mL in control animals (P =.60). Fetal blood lactate increased in the hypoxic animals, averaging 3.4 +/- 2.1 mmol/L versus 1.6 +/- 0.3 mmol/L in control animals (P =.02). Fetal urinary excretions of sodium, potassium, chloride, and lactate increased significantly during hypoxia, by 170% to 400%. CONCLUSION: Four days of nitrogen-induced hypoxia in the ovine fetus resulted in excess fetal urinary flow approximating 1000 mL/d greater than normal without the development of polyhydramnios. Because amniotic fluid volume did not change and hypoxia is a known inhibitor of fetal swallowing, we speculate that intramembranous absorption of amniotic water, electrolytes, and lactate increased.

    Title Effect of Esophageal Ligation on Amniotic Fluid Volume and Urinary Flow Rate in Fetal Sheep.
    Date May 2000
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: Although the fetus normally swallows large volumes of amniotic fluid each day, it is unclear whether amniotic fluid volume increases after fetal esophageal obstruction or whether fetal urine production changes. Our objective was to determine the effects of fetal esophageal ligation on amniotic fluid volume and urinary flow rate over time. STUDY DESIGN: Seven late-gestation fetal sheep underwent esophageal ligation, and 7 served as time control animals. The urachus was ligated to eliminate urine flow to the allantoic cavity. On days 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 after surgery, we measured the composition of amniotic fluid, fetal urine, and fetal and maternal blood, as well as amniotic fluid volume and fetal urinary flow rate. A 3-factor analysis of variance was used for statistical analysis. RESULTS: Amniotic fluid volume did not change with time in the control group, averaging 876 +/- 142 mL (mean +/- SEM), and it decreased in the esophageal ligation group (P =.020), averaging 309 +/- 75 mL on day 9. Fetal urinary flow rate was lower (P =.0063) in the esophageal ligation group (431 +/- 27 mL/d) than in the control group (631 +/- 54 mL/d). There were no differences in fetal or maternal blood compositions between the two groups. Amniotic fluid sodium and chloride increased in the ligated animals. CONCLUSION: Polyhydramnios did not occur after esophageal ligation, even though the fetuses excreted approximately 4000 mL of urine over the 9-day study period. This suggests that intramembranous absorption is substantially increased. With only small changes in amniotic solute concentrations, intramembranous solute absorption must occur simultaneously with water, suggesting a near-zero reflection coefficient for solutes. We speculate that fetal urine, lung secretions, or both contain a factor that increases intramembranous permeability.

    Title Anion Gap Determination in Preeclampsia.
    Date March 1998
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To determine if the calculated anion gap differs according to presence or absence of hypertension in pregnant women. METHODS: Retrospective data were obtained for 1223 patients who delivered at a community hospital during a 6-month period. Fifty-six (4.6%) of these patients were considered to have proteinuric hypertension, 66 (5.4%) to have non-proteinuric hypertension, and 1101 (90%) to be normotensive. The Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests were used to compare these groups with respect to the anion gap and serum sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate. RESULTS: Compared with the other two groups, proteinuric hypertensive patients tended to have lower values for serum sodium (P < .005) and the anion gap (P < .005). There were no statistically significant differences between the groups with respect to serum chloride or bicarbonate. CONCLUSION: The anion gap appears to be smaller with proteinuric hypertension than it is without.


    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Dian Fogle

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    Atlanta, GA

    Dr. Thomas Trevett

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    12 years experience
    Atlanta, GA

    Dr. Raymond Allen

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    27 years experience
    Atlanta, GA

    Dr. Michael Randell

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    19 years experience
    Atlanta, GA

    Dr. Amy Wetter

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    8 years experience
    Atlanta, GA

    Dr. Jill Purdie

    Obstetrics & Gynecology
    6 years experience
    Atlanta, GA
    Search All Similar Doctors