Urologists
23 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
500 University Dr
Hershey, PA 17033
800-233-4082
Locations and availability (1)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
Thomas Jefferson University (1987)
  • Currently 3 of 4 apples
Top 50%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice Award (2008 - 2011)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2011)
Associations
American Board of Urology
American Urological Association

Affiliations ?

Dr. Harpster is affiliated with 3 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Lancaster General Hospital
    Urology
    555 N Duke St, Lancaster, PA 17602
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
    500 University Dr, Hershey, PA 17033
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Heart of Lancaster Regional Medical Center
    1500 Highlands Dr, Lititz, PA 17543
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Harpster has contributed to 8 publications.
    Title Superficial Bladder Cancer Metastatic to the Lungs: Two Case Reports and Review of the Literature.
    Date February 2009
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    Bladder cancer remains a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States, with mortality related predominantly to metastasis. Approximately 70% of newly diagnosed cases of bladder cancer represent superficial disease that, despite a high risk of local recurrence, rarely progress to invasive or metastatic disease. The present cases demonstrate isolated pulmonary metastases associated with low-grade superficial bladder cancer, without previous evidence of muscle-invasive disease. Distant spread of low-grade superficial tumors is extremely unusual, and we review the literature and discuss the management of this rare entity.

    Title Initial Results Using a Running Vesicourethral Anastomosis Following Open Radical Retropubic Prostatectomy.
    Date January 2007
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    We assessed the results of early catheter removal following radical prostatectomy using a continuous suture vesicourethral anastomosis.

    Title The Treatment of Gross Hematuria Secondary to Prostatic Bleeding with Finasteride.
    Date April 1998
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: We evaluate the use of finasteride to control gross hematuria secondary to prostatic bleeding. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed retrospectively 42 patients treated with finasteride to treat gross hematuria. RESULTS: There were 28 evaluable patients who had taken finasteride for at least 6 months to control gross hematuria and hematuria ceased in 25 (91%). In 1 patient clot retention developed requiring transurethral resection of the prostate and 2 patients had 1 or more minor episodes of bleeding that resolved spontaneously. CONCLUSIONS: Finasteride appears to be an effective agent for controlling gross hematuria secondary to prostatic bleeding.

    Title Is Heparin Contraindicated in Pelvic Lymphadenectomy and Radical Prostatectomy?
    Date September 1997
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: We initiated a prospective study to verify or refute the complications of lymphocele formation and excessive blood loss associated with heparin prophylaxis in pelvic lymphadenectomy and radical prostatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective study was completed on 579 men undergoing pelvic lymphadenectomy usually in association with radical prostatectomy. Patients were assigned to group 1 (given preoperative and postoperative subcutaneous heparin) and group 2 (no heparin). All patients were evaluated 2 to 3 weeks after surgery with ultrasound for pelvic lymphocele. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in the number or size of pelvic lymphoceles or blood loss in group 1 versus group 2. CONCLUSIONS: The use of heparin prophylaxis to prevent thromboembolic complications in conjunction with pelvic lymphadenectomy and radical prostatectomy is not associated with increased blood loss or increased rate of lymphocele formation.

    Title Antibiotic Prophylaxis in Ultrasound Guided Transrectal Prostate Biopsy.
    Date June 1997
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: A retrospective review of a large group of transrectal ultrasound guided biopsies was performed to determine the symptomatic urinary tract infection rate associated with a consistent and defined antibiotic prophylaxis regimen. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 4,439 biopsies was performed using an 18 gauge needle with ultrasound guidance. Patients were treated with 500 mg. ciprofloxacin twice daily for 8 doses beginning the day before biopsy. RESULTS: Of 5 symptomatic urinary tract infections noted 3 were complicated. CONCLUSIONS: These data demonstrate the low infection rate associated with this prophylaxis regimen.

    Title The Incidence and Management of Rectal Injury Associated with Radical Prostatectomy in a Community Based Urology Practice.
    Date October 1995
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: We assessed the use of combination bowel preparation before radical prostatectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We reviewed 533 radical prostatectomies performed from 1984 to 1994. All patients underwent preoperative combination bowel preparation. The incidence, management and sequelae of rectal injury were determined. The literature addressing the management of rectal injuries was reviewed. RESULTS: Rectal injury occurred in 8 patients (1.5%). Injury was recognized intraoperatively and repaired primarily in 6 cases, and repair included colostomy in 2. Injury was recognized postoperatively as recto-urinary fistula in 2 cases and initial management was conservative. No fistula closed with conservative management. There were no pelvic abscesses and no deaths. CONCLUSIONS: Combination bowel preparation permits safe closure of rectal injury at radical prostatectomy without the necessity of routine colostomy. In the event of recto-urinary fistula, conservative management is not warranted.

    Title Urothelial Carcinoma in a Man with Hereditary Nonpolyposis Colon Cancer.
    Date
    Journal Reviews in Urology
    Excerpt

    Although most upper tract urothelial carcinomas are believed to be acquired, patients with hereditary nonpolyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) may have more than 20 times the risk of the normal population for these cancers. Certain mismatch repair mutations are now known to be associated with the disease. Screening and surveillance regimens are still evolving, but urinalysis, urine cytology, cystoscopy, and periodic upper tract imaging are the mainstays. HNPCC should be considered in any patient who develops an upper tract urothelial cancer or has a suggestive family history.

    Title Significant Activity of Single Agent Vinorelbine Against Small-cell Cancer of the Bladder As Second Line Chemotherapy: A Case Series and Review of the Literature.
    Date
    Journal Urologic Oncology
    Excerpt

    Small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is an extremely uncommon form of urologic malignancy, accounting for less that 1% of new cases of bladder cancer. It is an aggressive malignancy which, like its pulmonary counterpart, tends to spread with distant metastases. This malignancy is generally chemotherapy and radiotherapy sensitive. Metastatic disease is typically treated with regimens active against small-cell carcinoma of the lung, such as cisplatin and etoposide. There are no data regarding second-line treatment of this cancer. We report our experience in 3 patients using the second generation vinca alkaloid, vinorelbine, in refractory metastatic small-cell carcinoma of the bladder. These 3 patients had extensive prior therapy but all 3 responded to weekly vinorelbine, with a complete response (CR) in 1, near CR in the second, and partial response in the third. Of note, the patient who sustained a CR has remained without disease and with excellent quality of life for nearly 4 years since starting vinorelbine. Indeed, the therapy was very well tolerated in all 3 patients with grade 2 cytopenia being the only toxicity. We conclude that vinorelbine is well tolerated and has activity in this case series in the second-line treatment of metastatic small-cell carcinoma of the bladder.


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