Urologists
32 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Lancaster Urology
2106 Harrisburg Pike
Suite 200
Lancaster, PA 17604
717-393-1771
Locations and availability (4)

Education ?

Medical School Score
Albany Medical College (1978)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Castle Connolly's Top Doctors™ (2012 - 2013)
Associations
American Board of Urology
American Urological Association
American Society for Reproductive Medicine

Affiliations ?

Dr. Jarowenko is affiliated with 10 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Ephrata Community Hospital
    169 Martin Ave, Ephrata, PA 17522
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Saint Joseph Medical Center
    145 N 6th St, Reading, PA 19601
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Milton S. Hershey Medical Center
    500 University Dr, Hershey, PA 17033
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Lancaster General Hospital *
    Urology
    555 N Duke St, Lancaster, PA 17602
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Lancaster Regional Medical Center
    Urology
    250 College Ave, Lancaster, PA 17603
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Heart of Lancaster Regional Medical Center
    1500 Highlands Dr, Lititz, PA 17543
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Harrisburg Hospital
    Urology
    111 S Front St, Harrisburg, PA 17101
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Good Samaritan Hospital
  • Lancaster General, Women & Babies Hosp.
    690 Good Dr, Lancaster, PA 17601
  • Community General Osteopathic Hospital
    4300 Londonderry Rd, Harrisburg, PA 17109
  • * This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

    Publications & Research

    Dr. Jarowenko has contributed to 15 publications.
    Title Limited Dose Monoclonal Il-2r Antibody Induction Protocol After Primary Kidney Transplantation.
    Date August 2003
    Journal American Journal of Transplantation : Official Journal of the American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons
    Excerpt

    This study prospectively compared immunoprophylaxis with a single intraoperative dose (2 mg/kg) of monoclonal interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) antibody vs. noninduction in kidney transplant recipients treated with tacrolimus (FK 506), mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) and a prednisone-based immunosuppression regimen. One hundred recipients of first-kidney transplant were enrolled into the study to receive either anti-IL-2R monoclonal antibody, daclizumab (2 mg/kg intraoperatively, limited anti-IL-2R) or no induction (control). Each patient also received oral tacrolimus (dosed to target trough level 10-15 ng/mL), MMF (500 mg bid) and prednisone. The primary efficacy end-point was the incidence of biopsy proven acute rejection during the first 6 months post-transplant. The patients were also followed for 12-month graft function, and graft and patient survival rates. Other than the donor's age being significantly lower in the control group, both groups were comparable with respect to age, weight, gender, race, human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR mismatch, panel reactive antibody (%PRA), cold ischemic time, cytomegalovirus (CMV) status, causes of renal failure, and duration and modes of renal replacement therapy (RRT). During the first 6 months, episodes of first biopsy confirmed acute rejection was 3/50 (6%) in the limited anti-IL-2R group and 8/50 (16%) in the controls (p < 0.05). Twelve-month patient 100/98 (%) and graft survival 100/96 (%) were not statistically different. The group receiving limited anti-IL-2R did not have any adverse reactions. Our study demonstrates that a limited (single) 2 mg/kg immunoprophylaxis dose with monoclonal IL-2R antibody (daclizumab) when combined with tacrolimus/MMF/steroid allows significant reduction in early renal allograft rejection to the single digit level. The therapy with anti-IL-2R antibody is simple and is well tolerated.

    Title Human Renal Cell Cancer Proliferation in Tissue Culture is Tonically Inhibited by Opioid Growth Factor.
    Date January 2000
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: Peptide growth factors alter cellular events by binding to specific receptors. One group of peptides, the endogenous opioids, is important in the growth of normal and neoplastic tissue. [Met5]enkephalin, also termed opioid growth factor (OGF), is a tonically active inhibitory factor that interacts with the OGF receptor, OGFr, formerly identified as Greek zeta (zeta) and appears to be autocrine produced by human cancer cells. This study examined the hypothesis that OGF directly inhibits proliferation of renal cell carcinoma in tissue culture. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Human renal cancer cells (Caki-2) were grown using routine tissue culture techniques. A variety of natural and synthetic opioids including OGF, opioid antagonists, and opioid antibodies were added to renal cancer cell cultures to determine role of these peptides in renal cell carcinoma. The experiments were repeated in serum-free media, and with 4 other human renal cancer cell lines: Caki-2, A498, SN12C, and ACHN. Immunocytochemistry was performed to examine the presence of OGF and its receptor. RESULTS: OGF was the most potent opioid peptide to influence human renal cell carcinoma. OGF depressed growth within 12 hours of treatment, with cell numbers subnormal by up to 48% of control levels. OGF action was receptor mediated, reversible, not cytotoxic, neutralized by antibodies to the peptide, and detected in the human renal cell carcinoma lines examined. OGF appeared to be autocrine produced and secreted, and was constitutively expressed. Both OGF and its receptor were detected in these cells. CONCLUSION: OGF tonically inhibits renal cancer cell proliferation in tissue culture, and may play a role in the pathogenesis and management of human renal cell cancer.

    Title Perinephric Abscess Masquerading As an Angiomyolipoma.
    Date July 1998
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Title Improved Detection of Recurrent Bladder Cancer Using the Bard Bta Stat Test.
    Date October 1997
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the BTA stat Test in the detection of recurrent bladder cancer. METHODS: Sensitivity and specificity were determined using frozen voided urine samples from patients with recurrent bladder cancer, volunteers, patients with nonurologic conditions, and patients with a history of bladder cancer but free of disease. Results of cytology and the original BTA Test were compared with the sensitivity of the BTA stat Test in a large subgroup of the patients with cancer. RESULTS: The BTA stat Test detected 147 (67%) of 220 recurrent cancers. For those urine samples with previous cytologic and BTA Test results available, cytology had a sensitivity of 23%, the BTA Test 44%, and the BTA stat Test 58% for detection of recurrent cancer (P < 0.001, stat versus cytology). The specificity of the BTA stat Test was 72% for benign genitourinary disease and 95% in healthy volunteers. CONCLUSIONS: The BTA stat Test has high sensitivity and is significantly superior to voided urine cytologic analysis in the detection of recurrent bladder cancer.

    Title Results of a Multicenter Trial Using the Bta Test to Monitor for and Diagnose Recurrent Bladder Cancer.
    Date August 1995
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: We compare the Bard BTA (bladder tumor antigen) test to voided cytology studies in patients undergoing surveillance cystoscopy for recurrent bladder cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A prospective, blinded, multicenter trial was performed. RESULTS: A total of 499 patients underwent 1,014 cystoscopic examinations and tumor was identified in 151. The bladder tumor antigen test was more sensitive than cytology studies in detecting recurrent cancer (p < 0.001), being positive in 61 cases versus 25 for cytology. The trial in healthy volunteers and nonurological patients estimates bladder tumor antigen test specificity to be 95.9%. CONCLUSIONS: The bladder tumor antigen test is a simple, rapid and inexpensive adjunct to cystoscopy, and the results are equivalent or superior to those of voided cytology as performed in this trial.

    Title The Efficacy of Transrectal Ultrasound and Prostate Cancer.
    Date January 1992
    Journal Critical Reviews in Diagnostic Imaging
    Excerpt

    An increased interest in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer, particularly in the last few years, is reflected in the literature. Numerous articles have been published since 1980 on the subject of imaging of the prostate gland. This article is a review of transrectal ultrasound and its efficacy in the diagnosis and treatment of prostate cancer. Included is a review of the normal prostate anatomy, typical and atypical sonographic features, clinical and radiographic staging of prostate cancer, efficacy of the digital rectal examination, role of ultrasound in prostate cancer screening, surgical treatment, and radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Title Management of Simultaneous Renal and Ureteral Calculi: Combined Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy and Ureteroscopy Under a Single Anesthetic.
    Date November 1989
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    Simultaneously occurring renal and ureteral calculi were treated in 28 renal units combining extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and ureteroscopy during a single anesthetic session. Distributions of ureteral calculi removed or attempted to be removed by ureteroscopy were upper third in 3, middle third in 4 and lower third in 21. If ureteroscopy was successful a ureteral stent was placed and extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy was applied to more proximal renal and upper ureteral calculi. Of 28 renal units 25 (89%) were rendered free of stones or had passable calculi of less than 3 mm. in diameter after a single combined treatment. This combined approach appears to be safe, effective and efficient.

    Title Desmopressin Control of Surgical Hemorrhage Secondary to Prolonged Bleeding Time.
    Date May 1988
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    Desmopressin has been used as a hemostatic agent in numerous hematological and nonhematological diseases. We report a case of surgical hemorrhage secondary to prolonged bleeding time of unexplained origin controlled with desmopressin.

    Title Influence of Cyclosporine on Posttransplant Blood Pressure Response.
    Date August 1987
    Journal American Journal of Kidney Diseases : the Official Journal of the National Kidney Foundation
    Excerpt

    The suggestion that hypertension is more prevalent in renal allograft recipients receiving cyclosporine (CyA), particularly those displaying nephrotoxicity, was tested by reviewing 200 patients' courses, including 92 cadaver (CAD) and 58 living-related (LRD) transplants using CyA and prednisone immunosuppression, and 19 CAD and 31 LRD transplants using azathioprine (Aza) and prednisone, all of whom had at least 1 year posttransplant complete outpatient follow-up. Both groups had a mean age of 33 years with a similar distribution of renal failure etiologies. Renal function was significantly impaired in the CyA group at all intervals (P less than .001, t test). The prevalence of hypertension was higher in the CyA group at all intervals, becoming significant at 12 (P less than .01) and 24 (P less than .05) months following transplantation (chi 2). While there was only a significant difference in mean diastolic BP at 12 months (P less than .05, t test), the mean number of antihypertensive and/or diuretic medications was significantly greater in the CyA group at 1 and 6 months (P less than .001) and at 12 months (P less than .01). By 24 months, the mean number of all antihypertensive and/or diuretic medications was no longer significantly different. However, the antihypertensive and diuretic requirements of the CyA group diminished with time, suggesting that the hypertension is not progressive if the CyA serum trough levels are maintained in the nontoxic range (less than 200 ng/mL).

    Title Ranitidine, Cimetidine, and the Cyclosporine-treated Recipient.
    Date October 1986
    Journal Transplantation
    Title Salvage of Difficult Transplant Complications by Percutaneous Techniques.
    Date May 1985
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    The use of percutaneous endourological techniques is demonstrated in recipients of renal allografts. Transplant complications that previously had required prompt surgical intervention may be approached safely by the judicious use of percutaneous manipulations. While examples of perirenal hematoma, renal abscess, urinary fistula and renal pelvic stone extraction are presented, close patient observation and a low threshold for surgical intervention are recommended to permit the continued, safe evaluation of this approach.

    Title Recipient Ureterocalycostomy in a Renal Allograft: Case Report of a Transplant Salvage.
    Date May 1985
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    The use of a recipient ureter ureterocalycostomy in the management of ureteral obstruction in a renal transplant recipient is presented. This technique can be used when primary modes of reconstruction are unavailable and nephrectomy is the only alternative.

    Title Use of Single J Urinary Diversion Stents in Intestinal Urinary Diversion.
    Date December 1983
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    A review of the past twenty months of intestinal-urinary diversion with use of the single J urinary diversion stents at Albany Medical Center Hospital and the Albany Veterans Administration Medical Center resulted in no ureteroileal anastomotic fistulas. Thirty-seven stented anastomoses were performed in 19 patients.

    Title Effect of External Pressure on Axillofemoral Bypass Grafts.
    Date May 1981
    Journal Annals of Surgery
    Excerpt

    External compression of axillofemoral grafts has been suggested many times as a cause for graft thrombosis. Thrombosis during sleep is the most common presentation of axillofemoral graft failure. Therefore, external compression of the graft by the body weight has been implicated in graft thrombosis. Six consecutive patients with axillofemoral bypass grafts for aortoiliac disease were studied on routine clinic visits. Pulsatile flow characteristics were studied by pulse volume recordings (PVR) and segmental Doppler pressure measurements in calf and ankle, prior to and during attempted graft compression, by having the patient lay on the graft. External compression by body weight did not alter the PVR and segmental Doppler pressure (P = NS) in the distal circulation. Therefore, these data suggest that external compression by the body weight may not be the primary cause of graft failure.

    Title Incidence of Erectile Dysfunction and Efficacy of Sildenafil in the Cardiac Transplantation Patient.
    Date
    Journal The Journal of Heart and Lung Transplantation : the Official Publication of the International Society for Heart Transplantation

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