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Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN)
16 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score
UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson (1994)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
APGO/Ortho-McNeil Faculty Development Award
Council for Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology National Faculty Award for Excellence in Resident Education
UT Southwestern Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award
Senior Resident Outstanding Teaching Award (1998)
Senior Resident Outstanding Teaching Award
APGO/Ortho-McNeil Faculty Development Award (2003)
UT Southwestern Outstanding Faculty Teaching Award (2002)
Council for Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology National Faculty Award for Excellence in Resident Education (2002)
Patients' Choice Award (2014)
Associations
American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
American Urogynecologic Society

Affiliations ?

Dr. Corton is affiliated with 9 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - St. Paul
    5909 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - Zale Lipshy
    5151 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Children's Medical Center of Dallas
    Obstetrician & Gynecologist
    1935 Motor St, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Parkland Health & Hospital System
    5201 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • UT Southwestern Zale Lipshy Hospital
  • UT Southwestern St Paul Hospital
  • Parkland Health and Hospital System
  • Dallas County Hospital District
  • Parkland Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Corton has contributed to 16 publications.
    Title Effectiveness of an Instructional Dvd on Third- and Fourth-degree Laceration Repair for Obstetrics and Gynecology Postgraduate Trainees.
    Date May 2010
    Journal International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics: the Official Organ of the International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
    Excerpt

    To assess the effectiveness of an instructional DVD on the anatomy and repair of anal sphincter lacerations to improve postgraduate trainees' understanding.

    Title Anterior Abdominal Wall Nerve and Vessel Anatomy: Clinical Implications for Gynecologic Surgery.
    Date April 2010
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    We sought to describe relationships of clinically relevant nerves and vessels of the anterior abdominal wall.

    Title Optimal Location and Orientation of Suture Placement in Abdominal Sacrocolpopexy.
    Date May 2009
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    To estimate the strongest location and optimal orientation of suture placement in the anterior longitudinal ligament for abdominal sacrocolpopexy in female cadavers.

    Title Does Supracervical Hysterectomy Provide More Support to the Vaginal Apex Than Total Abdominal Hysterectomy?
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess whether cervical preservation at the time of hysterectomy may help prevent subsequent apical vaginal vault prolapse. STUDY DESIGN: Supracervical hysterectomies were performed in 12 unembalmed cadavers. Successive hanging weights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg were loaded against the cervical stump and distances moved were recorded. The same process was repeated after completion of a total hysterectomy. RESULTS: Average distances pulled with 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg of traction against the cervical stump were 17.8 +/- 1.9, 24.1 +/- 2.5, 29.0 +/- 2.8, and 34.3 +/- 3.5 mm, respectively. After total hysterectomy, these distances were 17.5 +/- 2.5, 23.5 +/- 2.6, 29.3 +/- 3.1, and 34.5 +/- 3.6 mm, respectively. CONCLUSION: In unembalmed cadavers, it appears that total abdominal hysterectomy and supracervical hysterectomy provide equal resistance to forces applied to the vaginal apex.

    Title Posterior Division of the Internal Iliac Artery: Anatomic Variations and Clinical Applications.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to characterize the anatomy of the internal iliac artery (IIA) and its posterior division branches and to correlate these findings to IIA ligation. STUDY DESIGN: Dissections were performed in 54 female cadavers. RESULTS: Average length of IIA was 27.0 (range, 0-52) mm. Posterior division arteries arose from a common trunk in 62.3% (66 of 106) of pelvic halves. In the remaining specimens, branches arose independently from the IIA, with the iliolumbar noted as the first branch in 28.3%, lateral sacral in 5.7%, and superior gluteal in 3.8%. The average width of the first branch was 5.0 (range, 2-12) mm. In all dissections, posterior division branches arose from the dorsal and lateral aspect of IIA. The internal iliac vein was lateral to the artery in 70.6% (12 of 17) of specimens on the left and 93.3% (14 of 15) on the right. CONCLUSION: Ligation of the IIA 5 cm distal from the common iliac bifurcation would spare posterior division branches in the vast majority of cases. Understanding IIA anatomy is essential to minimize intra-operative blood loss and other complications.

    Title Neurovascular Anatomy of the Sacrospinous Ligament Region in Female Cadavers: Implications in Sacrospinous Ligament Fixation.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to further characterize the anatomy of the coccygeus muscle-sacrospinous ligament (C-SSL) complex and to correlate the findings with sacrospinous ligament fixations (SSLF). STUDY DESIGN: Dissections were performed in 21 female cadavers. RESULTS: In all dissections, nerves originating from S3, S4, S5, or a combination passed over the anterior surface of the C-SSL at its midsegment, and either the pudendal or third sacral nerve coursed on the superior border of C-SSL at its midpoint. In 100% of specimens, the internal pudendal artery (IPA) passed behind or just medial to the ischial spine. The average distance of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) from the ischial spine and the superior border of the C-SSL was 24.2 (range, 15-35) mm and 3.4 (range, 1-5) mm, respectively. CONCLUSION: Nerves to the coccygeus and levator ani coursed over the midportion of the C-SSL where SSLF sutures are placed. The pudendal nerve and IGA were in proximity to the superior border of the C-SSL at its midportion, whereas the IPA passed behind the ischial spine, lateral to the recommended site for suture placement.

    Title Anatomic Relationships of the Distal Third of the Pelvic Ureter, Trigone, and Urethra in Unembalmed Female Cadavers.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine the relationship of the ureter to paravaginal defect repair (PVDR) sutures and to evaluate the anatomy of distal ureter, trigone, and urethra relative to the anterior vaginal wall. STUDY DESIGN: Dissections of the retropubic space were performed in 24 unembalmed female cadavers following placement of PVDR sutures. Lengths of the vagina, urethra, and trigone were recorded. RESULTS: The mean distance between apical PVDR sutures and the ureter was 22.8 (range, 5-36) mm. The average lengths of the urethra, trigone, and vagina were 3 cm, 2.8 cm, and 8.4 cm, respectively. The trigone was positioned over the middle third of the anterior vaginal wall in all specimens and the distal ureters traversed the anterolateral vaginal fornices. CONCLUSION: The ureters may be injured during paravaginal defect repairs, anterior colporrhaphies, and other procedures involving dissection in the upper third of the vagina. Cystotomy during vaginal hysterectomies is most likely to occur 2-3 cm above the trigone.

    Title Uterosacral Ligament Suspension Sutures: Anatomic Relationships in Unembalmed Female Cadavers.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to characterize anatomic relationships of uterosacral ligament suspension (USLS) sutures. STUDY DESIGN: The relationship of USLS sutures to the ureters, rectal lumen, and sidewall neurovascular structures was examined in 15 unembalmed female cadavers. RESULTS: The mean distance of the proximal sutures to the ureters and rectal lumen was 14 mm (range, 0-33) and 10 mm (range, 0-33), respectively. The mean distance of the distal sutures to the ureters was 14 mm (range, 4-33) and to the rectal lumen 13 mm (range, 3-23). Right sutures were noted at the level of S1 in 37.5%, S2 in 37.5%, and S3 in 25% of specimens. Left sutures were noted at the level of S1 in 50%, S2 in 29.2%, and S3 in 20.8% of cadavers. Of 48 sutures passed, 1 entrapped the S3 nerve. Sutures perforated the pelvic sidewall vessels in 4.1% of specimens. CONCLUSION: USLS sutures can directly injure the ureters, rectum, and neurovascular structures in the pelvic walls.

    Title Vascular Anatomy of the Presacral Space in Unembalmed Female Cadavers.
    Date December 2006
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to characterize the vascular anatomy of the female presacral space (PSS) and to correlate findings to the abdominal sacrocolpopexy. STUDY DESIGN: Detailed dissections of the PSS were performed in 52 unembalmed female cadavers. RESULTS: The closest cephalad vessel to the mid sacral promontory (MSP) was the left common iliac vein (LCIV), mean distance 27 mm (9-52 mm). The closest vessel lateral to MSP was also the LCIV, mean distance 22 mm (9-35 mm). The average distance of the middle sacral artery and vein to the MSP was 4 mm (0-15 mm) and 7 mm (0-17 mm), respectively. The mean distance of the sacral venous plexuses to the MSP was 34 mm (4-86 mm). CONCLUSION: Anatomic location of the vascular boundaries and contents of the PSS is highly variable. Careful dissection and exposure of the anterior longitudinal ligament of the sacrum before suture placement should minimize potentially life-threatening vascular complications.

    Title Anatomical Path of the Tension-free Vaginal Tape: Reassessing Current Teachings.
    Date December 2006
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to revisit the anatomical path of the tension-free vaginal tape and better describe its relationship to the perineal membrane and other important anatomic landmarks. STUDY DESIGN: Dissections of the anterior perineal triangle, periurethral, and retropubic spaces were performed in 24 unembalmed female cadavers following placement of the tension-free vaginal tape to identify the sling's relationship to the perineal membrane, periurethral muscles, and the arcus tendineus fascia pelvis. RESULTS: In 100% of specimens, the device passed cephalad to the perineal membrane. The urethrovaginal sphincter muscle was perforated in 2 of the specimens. The sling passed lateral to the arcus tendineus and perforated the pubococcygeus muscle in 6 (25%) of the cadavers. In the remaining 18 (75%) specimens, the mesh was medial to the arcus tendineus and penetrated the periurethral connective tissue. CONCLUSION: The assertion that the tension-free vaginal tape perforates the perineal membrane is incorrect.

    Title A Comparison of an Interactive Computer-based Method with a Conventional Reading Approach for Learning Pelvic Anatomy.
    Date December 2006
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to assess the impact of interactive, computer-based versus conventional, paper-based format in student, resident, and fellow learning and retention of anatomy knowledge. STUDY DESIGN: Randomized longitudinal cohort design with scores repeated as pre-, post-, and follow-up tests. Subjects were randomly assigned to an anatomy module in computer-based (CD-ROM) format and 1 in paper-based format. A follow-up examination was administered 3 weeks after the posttest to evaluate retention of knowledge. Tests results were analyzed by using Student t tests and analysis of variance. RESULTS: Thirty-nine subjects completed all testing. Regardless of instructional method, pretest to posttest scores improved (P < .01), and posttest to follow-up test scores decreased among all levels of training (P < .01). Student satisfaction was highest with CD-ROM format. CONCLUSION: Improvement and retention of anatomy knowledge was not significantly different when comparing a new CD-ROM interactive approach with a traditional paper-based method.

    Title Appearance of the Levator Ani Muscle in Pregnancy As Assessed by 3-d Mri.
    Date March 2006
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe levator ani (LA) anatomy in postterm nulliparas using 3-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance (MR). STUDY DESIGN: Nulliparas (n = 84) with uncomplicated, postterm pregnancies underwent an MR (4 mm slices, 0 gap) of the uterus and pelvis. LA volume and morphometry were assessed using 3-D post-processing software. RESULTS: LA insertion into the symphysis was visible in 93%, and the iliococcygeus muscle assumed a convex shape (arch) in the 92% of the 84 women. The LA shape was characterized as "U" in 53% and "V" in 47%. Mean LA volume was 13.5 (3.7) cm3. There was a positive association between LA volume and higher fetal station (P = .02) and increasing BMI (P < .001). However, no relationship between LA volume and station was found after adjusting for BMI. CONCLUSION: BMI was correlated with LA volume in postterm nulliparas. LA insertion into the symphysis and the iliococcygeus arch were well-preserved overall and morphometry was variable.

    Title Vascular Anatomy over the Superior Pubic Rami in Female Cadavers.
    Date March 2006
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to characterize the vascular anatomy over the superior pubic ramus. STUDY DESIGN: Detailed dissections of the retropubic space were performed in 15 fresh female cadavers. Vessels crossing the superior pubic rami were inspected for width, course, communications, and relationship to the midline of the pubic symphysis and the obturator canal. RESULTS: Vessels 1 mm or greater in width connecting the obturator vessels and inferior epigastric or external iliac vessels were noted in 10 of 15 (66.7%) cadavers: 9 (60%) had veins, 5 (33.3 %) had arteries, and 4 (26.7%) had both. In all specimens, the vessels crossed over the superior pubic rami lateral to or at the level of the obturator canal, which was on average 5.4 cm from the midline of the pubic symphysis. CONCLUSION: Communicating vessels crossing the superior pubic rami were present in the majority of specimens. Understanding this anatomy should aid the surgeon in avoiding vascular complications.

    Title Anatomy of the Pelvis: How the Pelvis is Built for Support.
    Date January 2006
    Journal Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Title Multiple Vaginal Wall Cysts: Diagnosis and Surgical Management.
    Date June 2004
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Simple cysts of the female genital tract may become symptomatic and require surgical removal. CASE: A 20-year-old woman had complaints of a vaginal bulge, pelvic pressure, dyspareunia, and stress urinary incontinence. Two cystic masses were seen in the vagina. A magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed 2 additional larger cysts. Urodynamic evaluation was significant for stress incontinence at 200 mL and a Valsalva leak-point pressure of 51 cm H(2)0. The 2 smaller cysts were removed intact through a superficial incision. The larger cysts were intentionally ruptured and dissected out. Histologic examination revealed a low cuboidal or a ciliated columnar epithelium that stained positive with mucicarmine, consistent with müllerian origin. One year after surgical excision, the patient remained symptom free with no urinary incontinence and no recurrence of the cysts. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging was useful in delineating the course and anatomic arrangement of the vaginal cysts, but more importantly, identified another cyst that was not readily apparent at physical examination.

    Title A Comprehensive Pelvic Dissection Course Improves Obstetrics and Gynecology Resident Proficiency in Surgical Anatomy.
    Date November 2003
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of a pelvic dissection course on resident proficiency in surgical anatomy. STUDY DESIGN: Over a 1-year period, residents attended a course consisting of pretesting and posttesting, lectures, and pelvic dissection. Tests results were analyzed using paired Student t test, analysis of variance, and Kruskal-Wallis statistics. RESULTS: Of 42 residents, 24 completed all testing (study cohort). On written and practical examinations, resident scores improved a median of 42% and 29% (both P<.0001). Postgraduate year (PGY) 2 demonstrated the greatest improvement on the practical and PGY-3s demonstrated the greatest improvement on the written. Baseline written and practical results discriminated PGY level (construct validity): PGY-2=PGY-3<PGY-4 on written pretest, PGY-2<PGY-3=PGY-4 on practical pretest. No difference between resident cohorts was seen in either posttest. CONCLUSION: Resident surgical anatomy proficiency is measurably improved by a comprehensive course.

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