Internists, Hospice & Palliative Specialist
14 years of experience

Accepting new patients
Oak Lawn
5303 Harry Hines Blvd
Dallas, TX 75390
214-648-2992
Locations and availability (2)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
Emory University (1996)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Internal Medicine

Affiliations ?

Dr. Paulk is affiliated with 8 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - St. Paul
    5909 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - Zale Lipshy
    5151 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Parkland Health & Hospital System
    5201 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Parkland Health and Hospital System
  • Parkland Hosp
  • Dallas County Hospital District
  • UT Southwestern Zale Lipshy Hospital
  • St. Paul
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Paulk has contributed to 5 publications.
    Title Racial Disparities in the Outcomes of Communication on Medical Care Received Near Death.
    Date October 2010
    Journal Archives of Internal Medicine
    Excerpt

    Black patients tend to receive more life-prolonging care at the end of life (EOL) than white patients. This study aimed to evaluate whether differences in patient-physician communication contribute to disparities in EOL care between black patients and white patients.

    Title Provision of Spiritual Care to Patients with Advanced Cancer: Associations with Medical Care and Quality of Life Near Death.
    Date February 2010
    Journal Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
    Excerpt

    To determine whether spiritual care from the medical team impacts medical care received and quality of life (QoL) at the end of life (EoL) and to examine these relationships according to patient religious coping.

    Title Religious Coping and Use of Intensive Life-prolonging Care Near Death in Patients with Advanced Cancer.
    Date March 2009
    Journal Jama : the Journal of the American Medical Association
    Excerpt

    Patients frequently rely on religious faith to cope with cancer, but little is known about the associations between religious coping and the use of intensive life-prolonging care at the end of life.

    Title Differences in Risk Factors for Suicidality Between African American and White Patients Vulnerable to Suicide.
    Date May 2007
    Journal Suicide & Life-threatening Behavior
    Excerpt

    Risk factors for suicidal ideation and attempts have been shown to differ between African Americans and Whites across the lifespan. In the present study, risk factors for suicidality were examined separately by race/ethnicity in a population of 131 older adult patients considered vulnerable to suicide due to substance abuse and/or medical frailty. In adjusted analyses, social support was significantly associated with suicidality in African American patients, while younger age and the presence of an anxiety disorder were significantly associated with suicidality in White patients. The results suggest that race/ethnicity-specific risk profiles may improve the detection of suicidality in vulnerable populations.

    Title Religiousness and Spiritual Support Among Advanced Cancer Patients and Associations with End-of-life Treatment Preferences and Quality of Life.
    Date March 2007
    Journal Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: Religion and spirituality play a role in coping with illness for many cancer patients. This study examined religiousness and spiritual support in advanced cancer patients of diverse racial/ethnic backgrounds and associations with quality of life (QOL), treatment preferences, and advance care planning. METHODS: The Coping With Cancer study is a federally funded, multi-institutional investigation examining factors associated with advanced cancer patient and caregiver well-being. Patients with an advanced cancer diagnosis and failure of first-line chemotherapy were interviewed at baseline regarding religiousness, spiritual support, QOL, treatment preferences, and advance care planning. RESULTS: Most (88%) of the study population (N = 230) considered religion to be at least somewhat important. Nearly half (47%) reported that their spiritual needs were minimally or not at all supported by a religious community, and 72% reported that their spiritual needs were supported minimally or not at all by the medical system. Spiritual support by religious communities or the medical system was significantly associated with patient QOL (P = .0003). Religiousness was significantly associated with wanting all measures to extend life (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 1.08 to 3.57). CONCLUSION: Many advanced cancer patients' spiritual needs are not supported by religious communities or the medical system, and spiritual support is associated with better QOL. Religious individuals more frequently want aggressive measures to extend life.


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