Internists, Physiatrist (physical, rehabilitation), Pain Management Specialist
37 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Novi
Rehabilitation Physicians
28455 Haggerty Rd
Ste 200
Novi, MI 48377
248-893-3200
Locations and availability (4)

Education ?

Medical School Score
Wayne State University (1973)
  • Currently 1 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Hour Detroit Magazine's Top Docs (2010)
Detroit Hour Magazine's Top Docs (2010)
Associations
American Board of Internal Medicine
American Academy of Pain Medicine
American Association of Neuromuscular and Electrodiagnostic Medicine
American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

Affiliations ?

Dr. Ellenberg is affiliated with 18 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan
    261 Mack Ave, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • DMC - Sinai-Grace Hospital
    6071 W Outer Dr, Detroit, MI 48235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
    3601 W 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48073
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital,Troy
    44201 Dequindre Rd, Troy, MI 48085
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital
    1 William Carls Dr, Commerce Township, MI 48382
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Providence Hospital and Medical Center
    16001 W 9 Mile Rd, Southfield, MI 48075
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe
    468 Cadieux Rd, Grosse Pointe, MI 48230
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Detroit Receiving Hospital & University Health Center
    4201 Saint Antoine St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Harper University Hospital
    3990 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • St John Detroit Riverview Hospital
    7733 E Jefferson Ave, Detroit, MI 48214
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Royal Oak
  • Royal Oak (9 Years
  • Sinai-Grace Hospital
    6071 W Outer Dr, Detroit, MI 48235
  • Grace Hospital
  • Providence Park Hospital
    47601 Grand River Ave, Novi, MI 48374
  • Sinai-Grace
  • Beaumont Affiliation & Years on StaffRoyal Oak
  • Sinaigrace Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Ellenberg has contributed to 9 publications.
    Title What You Always Wanted to Know About the History and Physical Examination of Neck Pain but Were Afraid to Ask.
    Date October 2003
    Journal Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Diagnoses of most cases of neck pain can be made on the basis of a careful history and physical examination. Any tests must be interpreted only in the context of the clinical examination. The clinician must be cognizant of signs or symptoms that may indicate a more serious disorder by attending to the red flags and examining the lower extremities for spasticity that could indicate cervical myelopathy.

    Title Cervical Radiculopathy.
    Date April 1994
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    The history, pathoanatomy and pathophysiology, clinical picture, differential diagnosis, diagnostic evaluation, and treatment of cervical radiculopathy are reviewed. The review is based on a 10-year Medline literature search, review of bibliographies in textbooks, and bibliographies in articles obtained through the search. Cervical radiculopathy, although recognized early in the 20th century, was first associated with disc pathology in the mid-1930s. It is most commonly caused by disc herniation or cervical spondylosis. History and physical examination using pain location, manual muscle testing, and specialized testing (Spurling's maneuver) will usually suffice to diagnose the radiculopathy and determine the root level involved. Diagnostic imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, or myelography should be used as presurgical evaluative tools or when tumor or other etiology besides disc herniation or spondylosis is suspected. Electromyography is of benefit in distinguishing various entities that clinically present similar to cervical radiculopathy and can also help to "date" the lesion. Treatment of this disorder has not been systematically studied in a controlled fashion. However, using a variety of different treatments, the radiculopathy usually improves without the need for surgery. Indications for surgery are unremitting pain despite a full trial of non-surgical management, progressive weakness, or new or progressive cervical myelopathy. Prospective studies evaluating the various treatment options would be of great benefit in guiding practitioners toward optimum cost-effective evaluation and care of the patient with cervical radiculopathy.

    Title Prospective Evaluation of the Course of Disc Herniations in Patients with Proven Radiculopathy.
    Date February 1993
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    Although surgery is often recommended as the definitive treatment for radiculopathy when definite disc herniation is demonstrated with imaging techniques, complete improvement can occur with nonoperative treatment. However, what happens to the disc in the latter circumstance is not well defined. We report the first prospective study in subjects with proven radiculopathy and definite disc herniation who improve with nonoperative management to determine what occurs to the herniated disc material. Eighteen subjects with lower extremity pain or paresthesia, positive straight leg raising, weakness in a myotomal distribution, reflex asymmetry, or electromyogram evidence of radiculopathy were studied. Subjects were admitted to the study if computed tomography (CT) scanning demonstrated definite disc herniation corresponding to the side and level of the radiculopathy. After complete clinical improvement, repeat CT scan was performed at six to 18 months after the initial study. The CT scans were interpreted separately by two neuroradiologists. Disc herniations were characterized by size (large, moderate, or minimal); the presence of absence of free fragments; and location. Follow-up scans were compared with the original study and characterized as resolved, improved, or unchanged. Fourteen subjects completed the study, an additional three had operative treatment, and one refused repeat scanning. Subjects were followed an average of 30.4 months with no recurrence of radicular symptoms during this follow-up period in 13 patients. One had recurrence of symptoms at 21 months and surgery at 26 months. Six follow-up scans (43%) were interpreted as completely resolved, five (36%) as improved, and three (21%) as unchanged.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

    Title Man-in-the-barrel Syndrome in a Noncomatose Patient: a Case Report.
    Date December 1991
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    A 62-year-old man developed man-in-the-barrel syndrome (MIBS) after emergency four-vessel coronary artery bypass surgery. MIBS refers to the clinical syndrome of bilateral upper extremity paresis with intact motor functioning of the lower extremities, giving the appearance of being confined within a barrel. The pathogenesis of MIBS is believed to be cerebral hypoperfusion leading to border zone infarctions between the territories of the anterior and middle cerebral arteries. Physical examination revealed bibrachial paresis, decreased upper extremity tone, mild left central VII palsy, flat affect, mild cognitive deficits, and poor balance while ambulating. An EMG showing poor motor unit recruitment and slow-firing motor units, and abnormal SSEPs indicated an upper motor neuron lesion. There was good progress in physical and occupational therapy, and good return of upper extremity function in four months. Only 11 cases of MIBS have been reported, all of whom were comatose; ten died. Our patient was never comatose and had good functional recovery.

    Title Cauda Equina Syndrome After in Situ Arthrodesis for Severe Spondylolisthesis at the Lumbosacral Junction.
    Date May 1991
    Journal The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
    Title Orthotic Technique for Dystonia Musculorum Deformans.
    Date November 1988
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    Tone reducing, inhibitive casting, and orthoses have been effectively used in patients with cerebral palsy and head injury to improve gait patterns and decrease tone. We present a patient with dystonia musculorum deformans who had severe inversion and supination of his left foot with weight bearing. He did poorly with metal double-upright ankle-foot orthoses with lateral T-strap. A tone-reducing ankle-foot orthosis (TRAFO) was successful in decreasing problems with abrasions and allowing him to walk without assistive devices.

    Title Temperature Effect on Antidromic and Orthodromic Sensory Nerve Action Potential Latency and Amplitude.
    Date October 1987
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    The measurement of sensory nerve action potential (SNAP) latency and amplitude is often necessary to accurately diagnose disorders of peripheral nerves. The sensory evoked response can be obtained using either the antidromic (AD) or orthodromic (OD) technique. In a previous study we demonstrated that in healthy subjects the AD SNAP distal latency of median and ulnar nerves at 14 cm distance is approximately 0.2 msec slower than the OD SNAP distal latency at 32C. The AD SNAP amplitude was also two times greater than the OD SNAP amplitude. In this study we observed that these differences between the AD and OD SNAP latency and amplitude varied significantly as temperature changed. The AD median nerve SNAP distal latency was delayed by .06 msec/degree with cooling. The OD median nerve SNAP distal latency was delayed by .03 msec/degree with cooling. These values represent less of a slowing per degree centigrade cooling than has been previously noted in the literature. The median nerve SNAP amplitude was found to increase with upper extremity cooling with the AD and OD technique by 3.5 microV and 0.5 microV per degree, respectively. For accurate interpretation of SNAP latency and amplitude, the electromyographer must be familiar with the technique used and the differing effect of the temperature with each technique.

    Title Gastric Partitioning Complicated by Peripheral Neuropathy with Lumbosacral Plexopathy.
    Date June 1987
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    Gastric bypass and partitioning are the two surgical procedures most commonly used in the treatment of morbid obesity. They are, however, not without their postoperative complications. These include acute and chronic problems such as wound infection, gastric leak, obstruction, embolism, and neurologic sequelae. Many studies have mentioned the frequent occurrence of polyneuropathy in the postgastrectomy state. This report describes a 38-year-old patient who developed an asymmetric peripheral neuropathy with lumbosacral plexus involvement following gastric bypass surgery for morbid obesity.

    Title Orthodromic Vs Antidromic Sensory Nerve Latencies in Healthy Persons.
    Date October 1985
    Journal Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
    Excerpt

    Sensory nerve action potentials may be evoked antidromically (AD) by stimulating a nerve proximally and recording distally, or orthodromically (OD) by stimulating distally and recording over the nerve trunk proximally. The objective of this study was to compare OD and AD distal latencies in healthy subjects. Fifty-two volunteers (average age 30 years) were tested. Orthodromic and AD sensory distal latencies of the median and ulnar nerves of the nondominant hand were obtained. Hand temperature was controlled at 32C. Six subjects were also tested at a hand temperature of 24C. In all subjects tested the OD latency was shorter than the AD latency. Median nerve AD = 3.14 +/- 0.20 (mean latency in ms +/- 1 standard deviation); median nerve OD = 2.94 +/- 0.20; ulnar nerve AD = 3.07 +/- 0.22; ulnar nerve OD = 2.85 +/- 0.19. Mean difference between the latencies obtained (OD vs AD) for the median and ulnar nerves was statistically significant (p less than 0.001). In addition, this difference was over twice as great at 24C compared to 32C for both median and ulnar nerves. Because of the difference between OD and AD sensory latencies, the standard values obtained using one method cannot be rigorously applied when utilizing the other method. Individual laboratories should develop their own normal values for both OD and AD methods, or be specific in performance of the studies when utilizing standards from the literature.


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