Obstetricians & Gynecologists, Neurologist (brain, nervous system)
15 years of experience

North Campus
University of New Mexico Hospital
2211 Lomas Blvd NE
Albuquerque, NM 87106
630-275-1152
Locations and availability (3)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
Virginia Commonwealth University (1995)
  • Currently 3 of 4 apples
Top 50%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology
American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Zsemlye is affiliated with 6 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Espanola Hospital
    1010 Spruce St, Espanola, NM 87532
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • University of New Mexico Hospital
    2211 Lomas Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM 87106
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Kaseman Presby Hosp
    8300 Constitution Ave NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Presbyterian Hospital
    1100 Central Ave SE, Albuquerque, NM 87106
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • UNM Medical Group
  • Alb Indian Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Zsemlye has contributed to 4 publications.
    Title In Vivo Light Scattering for the Detection of Cancerous and Precancerous Lesions of the Cervix.
    Date June 2009
    Journal Applied Optics
    Excerpt

    A noninvasive optical diagnostic system for detection of cancerous and precancerous lesions of the cervix was evaluated in vivo. The optical system included a fiber-optic probe designed to measure polarized and unpolarized light transport properties of a small volume of tissue. An algorithm for diagnosing tissue based on the optical measurements was developed that used four optical properties, three of which were related to light scattering properties and the fourth of which was related to hemoglobin concentration. A sensitivity of ~77% and specificities in the mid 60% range were obtained for separating high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. The use of different cross-validation methods in algorithm development is analyzed, and the relative difficulties of diagnosing certain pathologies are assessed. Furthermore, the robustness of the optical system for use by different doctors and to changes in fiber-optic probe are also assessed, and potential improvements in the optical system are discussed.

    Title In Vivo Light Scattering Measurements for Detection of Precancerous Conditions of the Cervix.
    Date May 2007
    Journal Gynecologic Oncology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the utility of in vivo elastic light scattering measurements to diagnose high grade squamous interepithelial lesions (HSIL) of the cervix. METHODS: A newly developed fiber optic probe was used to measure light transport in the cervical epithelium of 36 patients undergoing standard colposcopy. Both unpolarized and polarized light transport were measured in the visible and near-infrared. Spectroscopic results of 29 patients were compared with histopathology of the measured sites using ROC curves, MANOVA and logistic regression. RESULTS: Three spectroscopic parameters are statistically different for HSIL compared with low-grade lesions and normal tissue. When these three spectroscopic parameters are combined, retrospective sensitivities and specificities for HSIL versus non-HSIL are 100% and 80%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Reflectance measurements of elastically scattered light show promise as a non-invasive, real-time method to discriminate HSIL from other abnormalities and normal tissue. These results compare favorably with those obtained by fluorescence alone and by fluorescence combined with light scattering.

    Title Preventing Cervical Cancer: the Pap Test and the Hpv Vaccine.
    Date
    Journal The Medical Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Women look to their internists and other primary care physicians to provide preventive health care. Periodic Pap tests are as much a part of a woman's ongoing health care as periodic lipid assessments, mammograms, screening for colon cancer, or any of the other recommended screening assessments. This article provides primary care physicians with the information needed to perform Pap tests at the appropriate intervals, or if not set up to do Pap tests themselves, to make the appropriate referrals. Also provided is the necessary information to counsel women with abnormal Pap tests who may need colposcopy or other follow-up evaluation. Finally, the role of the HPV vaccine in the prevention of cervical cancer is summarized.

    Title Detection of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasias and Cancers in Cervical Tissue by in Vivo Light Scattering.
    Date
    Journal Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the utility of in vivo elastic light scattering measurements to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) 2/3 and cancers in women undergoing colposcopy and to determine the effects of patient characteristics such as menstrual status on the elastic light scattering spectroscopic measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A fiber optic probe was used to measure light transport in the cervical epithelium of patients undergoing colposcopy. Spectroscopic results from 151 patients were compared with histopathology of the measured and biopsied sites. A method of classifying the measured sites into two clinically relevant categories was developed and tested using five-fold cross-validation. RESULTS: Statistically significant effects by age at diagnosis, menopausal status, timing of the menstrual cycle, and oral contraceptive use were identified, and adjustments based upon these measurements were incorporated in the classification algorithm. A sensitivity of 77+/-5% and a specificity of 62+/-2% were obtained for separating CIN 2/3 and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of both menstrual status and age should be taken into account in the algorithm for classifying tissue sites based on elastic light scattering spectroscopy. When this is done, elastic light scattering spectroscopy shows good potential for real-time diagnosis of cervical tissue at colposcopy. Guiding biopsy location is one potential near-term clinical application area, while facilitating "see and treat" protocols is a longer term goal. Improvements in accuracy are essential.


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