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Otolaryngologist (ear, nose, throat)
8 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
University of Michigan Medical School (2002)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice Award (2014)
On-Time Doctor Award (2014)
Appointments
Wayne State University, Detroit, Mi (2007 - Present)
Associations
American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
American Board of Otolaryngology
American Board of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

Affiliations ?

Dr. Carron is affiliated with 23 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe
    Otolaryngology
    468 Cadieux Rd, Grosse Pointe, MI 48230
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Beaumont Hospital,Troy
    Otolaryngology
    44201 Dequindre Rd, Troy, MI 48085
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Rehabilitation Institute of Michigan
    Otolaryngology
    261 Mack Ave, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center
    Otolaryngology
    18101 Oakwood Blvd, Dearborn, MI 48124
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
    Otolaryngology
    3601 W 13 Mile Rd, Royal Oak, MI 48073
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Detroit Receiving Hospital & University Health Center
    Otolaryngology
    4201 Saint Antoine St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Harper University Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    3990 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Huron Valley-Sinai Hospital
    Otolaryngology
    1 William Carls Dr, Commerce Township, MI 48382
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Oakwood Hospital
  • Detroit Receiving Hospital
  • Children's Hospital of Michigan
    3901 Beaubien St, Detroit, MI 48201
  • Hutzel Women's Hospital
    3980 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
  • Harper Hospital
  • Karmanos Cancer Center
    4100 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
  • Sinai-Grace Hospital
    6071 W Outer Dr, Detroit, MI 48235
  • Straith Hospital for Special Surgery
  • Royal Oak (2 Years
  • John D. Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    4646 John R St, Detroit, MI 48201
  • Hutzel Hospital
  • Royal Oak
  • Straith Hospital for Surgery
    23901 Lahser Rd, Southfield, MI 48033
  • Detroit Receiving - UHC
  • Barbara Ann Karmanos Cancer Institute
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Carron has contributed to 10 publications.
    Title Biomechanical Analysis of Anchoring Points in Rhytidectomy.
    Date March 2010
    Journal Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery : Official Publication for the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Inc. and the International Federation of Facial Plastic Surgery Societies
    Excerpt

    To quantify tissue tearing force at various anchoring points on the face.

    Title Treatment of Dorsal Deviation.
    Date September 2009
    Journal Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    The deviated nasal dorsum is a complex problem with a variety of proposed solutions. Straightening the deviated nose should be focused on maximizing cosmetic outcome while preserving or improving nasal function. Deviations can occur in one or a combination of the nasal thirds. A simple approach to treatment is to develop a strategy for each third of the nose. Tailoring maneuvers to alleviate problems in each specific third helps the surgeon deal with deviations in an effective and straightforward manner.

    Title Sequelae of Rapid Growing Mycobacteria Otomastoiditis in a Child.
    Date July 2009
    Journal Archives of Otolaryngology--head & Neck Surgery
    Title Baseline Laryngeal Effects Among Individuals with Dust Mite Allergy.
    Date August 2008
    Journal Otolaryngology--head and Neck Surgery : Official Journal of American Academy of Otolaryngology-head and Neck Surgery
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To examine baseline effects of perennial allergy on laryngeal appearance, laryngeal function, and perceived vocal handicap among individuals without current allergy or voice symptoms. DATA SOURCES: This pilot study included 47 adults: 21 with positive and 26 with negative skin test responses for the dust mite, Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus. METHODS: Subjects were tested for sensitivity to dust mite antigen by prick testing. Laryngeal appearance and function were studied with laryngovideostroboscopy, acoustic and speech aerodynamic analysis, and voice sampling. These parameters were blindly analyzed by three trained examiners. Subjects also completed the Voice Handicap Index (VHI) as a measure of vocal handicap. RESULTS: Subjects allergic to dust mites perceived significantly greater vocal handicap on the VHI than did nonallergic subjects. No significant differences were noted between groups in laryngeal appearance or function. CONCLUSION: These pilot data suggest that, at baseline, allergic individuals perceive greater vocal handicap than their nonallergic counterparts (P = 0.04), even in the absence of current allergy symptoms or observable physical or functional abnormalities. These preliminary observations can serve as an impetus for further research into this important area, including the potential interrelationship between acid reflux disease and allergic laryngeal inflammation.

    Title Tongue Base Schwannoma: Report, Review, and Unique Surgical Approach.
    Date June 2008
    Journal American Journal of Otolaryngology
    Excerpt

    Base of tongue schwannomas are exceedingly rare and therefore often are not immediately included in the differential diagnosis and treatment of oropharyngeal tumors. After a thorough review of the English literature, we found only 6 previously reported cases of tongue base schwannomas. We are contributing a report of a 37-year-old woman with progressive dysphagia, dysarthria, and large tongue base schwannoma. Diagnosis was confirmed by imaging studies and biopsy followed by surgical excision designed to preserve nerve function. A number of surgical approaches have been described for tongue base schwannomas. Each has its own degree of postoperative morbidity. The use of a unilateral transcervical incision with blunt dissection was simple and quickly accomplished with protection of nearby nerves. Histologic identification of Antoni A and B areas along with strong and diffuse staining with S-100 stain pathologically completed the diagnosis of schwannoma.

    Title Airway Obstruction by Granulation Tissue Within a Fenestrated Tracheotomy Tube: Case Report.
    Date March 2007
    Journal Ear, Nose, & Throat Journal
    Excerpt

    Complications of tracheotomy tube placement can be categorized as intraoperative, early postoperative, and late postoperative. Among the late complications is the development of granulation tissue. We describe one of the few reported cases of granulation tissue that formed within a fenestrated tracheotomy tube. In this case, the granulation tissue grew through the fenestrations, obliterated the tracheal lumen, and tethered the tube to the trachea itself. As a result, the patient required emergency treatment to restore airway patency.

    Title Identification of Helicobacter Pylori Biofilms in Human Gastric Mucosa.
    Date December 2006
    Journal Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery : Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
    Excerpt

    The purpose of this study was to use endoscopically directed biopsies and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to document the existence of Helicobacter pylori biofilms in human gastric mucosa. Patients underwent flexible esophagogastroduodenoscopies with three gastric mucosal biopsies. Rapid urease testing was performed to determine the presence or absence of H pylori. Urease-positive and urease-negative control specimens were imaged with SEM to obtain detailed images of gastric mucosa for the identification of biofilm colonies. Samples were obtained from patients who underwent esophagogastroduodenoscopies. Eleven were found to be H pylori positive and nine were H pylori negative. These were imaged at 500x and 1000x with electron microscopy. Dense, mature biofilms were present and attached to the cell surface of H pylori-positive specimens and were absent in urease-negative controls. Photomicrographs were obtained. Biofilms are complex microbiological ecosystems where sessile bacteria surround themselves in a protective matrix. This lifestyle affords protection, allows for growth in hostile environments, and alters host physiology. Many have hypothesized that H pylori infections resulting in gastric ulcers may be a manifestation of biofilms. Our investigation is the first to photographically document the existence of H pylori biofilms on human gastric mucosa. This elucidation of the ecology and pathophysiology of the mucosa of the organism is important to our understanding of a potential mechanism of this organism's resistance to current therapy and how to better eradicate it in the future.

    Title Presence and Density of Helicobacter Pylori Biofilms in Human Gastric Mucosa in Patients with Peptic Ulcer Disease.
    Date November 2006
    Journal Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery : Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
    Excerpt

    Our purpose was to use endoscopically directed biopsies and scanning electron microscopy to quantify Helicobacter pylori biofilm density on the surface of human gastric mucosa in urease-positive and -negative patients. Participating patients underwent flexible esophago-gastro-duodenoscopies coupled with gastric mucosal biopsies. Rapid urease testing was performed on all specimens to determine the presence of H. pylori, followed by scanning electron microscopy to identify the existence of biofilms. Samples were then analyzed using Carnoy Image Analysis Software to determine percent biofilm coverage of the total surface area. These data were compared to control specimens that were urease negative. Of the patients who tested urease positive for H. pylori, the average percent of total surface area covered by biofilms was 97.3%. Those testing negative had an average surface area coverage of only 1.64%. These differences were determined to be statistically significant at the 0.0001 level. This study demonstrates that compared with controls, urease-positive specimens have significant biofilm formation, whereas urease-negative specimens have little to none. This was reflected in the significantly increased biofilm surface density in urease positive specimens compared with urease-negative controls.

    Title Embryonic Origin of the Caudal Mesenteric Artery in the Mouse.
    Date December 2003
    Journal The Anatomical Record. Part A, Discoveries in Molecular, Cellular, and Evolutionary Biology
    Excerpt

    It is commonly held that the caudal mesenteric artery (CaMA, or inferior mesenteric artery in humans) arises in the same manner as the celiac and cranial mesenteric artery (CrMA, or superior mesenteric artery in humans), i.e., from the remodeling of the vitelline system of arteries that surrounds and supports the yolk sac. Conflicting evidence about the precise manner in which the CaMA arises was presented in studies of the luxate syndrome (Carter: J. Genet. 1954;52:1-35) and sirenomelia (Schreiner and Hoornbeek: J. Morphol. 1973;141:345-358) in the mouse. These studies suggested that the CaMA arises from the remodeling of the medial umbilical arterial roots. Later studies of blood vessel development in the hindlimb of the Dominant hemimelic mouse (Gest: Anat. Rec. 1984;208:296; Anat. Rec. 1987;218:49A; Gest and Roden: Anat. Rec. 1988;220:37-38A) also supported the results of the previous studies. The present investigation tests the hypothesis that the CaMA arises as a result of the regression and remodeling of the medial umbilical arterial roots. Vascular corrosion casts of 9.5-13.5-day-old mouse embryos were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of the present investigation agree with the aforementioned studies. The medial umbilical roots initially conduct the blood to the placenta. On days 10-12 the medial umbilical roots regress and remodel into the CaMA, while the lateral umbilical roots take over the blood supply to the placenta. On the basis of our results, we conclude that the CaMA arises from the medial umbilical roots and not from the remodeling of the vitelline system of arteries, as previously assumed.

    Title Craniocervical Necrotizing Fasciitis with and Without Thoracic Extension: Management Strategies and Outcome.
    Date
    Journal American Journal of Otolaryngology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: First objective was to review cases of craniocervical necrotizing fasciitis (CCNF) at Wayne State University/Detroit Medical Center (Detroit, MI) for the last 18 years. Second was to analyze patients with and without thoracic extension for contributing factors. METHODS: Retrospective review of 660 patients with necrotizing fasciitis treated at WSU/DMC from January 1989 to January 2007 was conducted. Data regarding source/extent of infection, presenting signs/symptoms, computed tomography, microbiology, antibiotics, comorbidities, number/type of operations, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy, hospital duration, complications, and overall outcome were compared/analyzed between patients with and without thoracic extension. RESULTS: Twenty patients with CCNF for the past 18 years met the inclusion criteria. Ten patients had thoracic extension, and 10 patients did not have. Individuals in the thoracic extension group were likely to be older, had increased comorbidity, required more surgical debridement, experienced increased postoperative complications, and had lower overall survival. Three patients with thoracic extension underwent HBO therapy and 66% survived. CONCLUSION: This is the largest single institutional review of CCNF comparing patients with and without thoracic extension. Patients with thoracic extension have a poorer outcome as follows: 60% (6/10) survival vs 100% (10/10) for those without thoracic extension (P < .05). The CCNF patients without thoracic extension treated at our institution all survived after prompt medical and surgical intervention. Overall survival of CCNF patients without thoracic extension may be attributed to rigorous wound care, broad spectrum intravenous antibiotics, aggressive surgical debridement, and vigilant care in surgical intensive care unit. The HBO therapy should be included if the patient can tolerate it.

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