Obstetrician & Gynecologist (OB/GYN), Pediatrician
13 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
7601 Preston Rd
Plano, TX 75024
469-303-3591
Locations and availability (7)

Education ?

Medical School Score
Northeastern Ohio Universities (1997)
  • Currently 1 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Core Clerkship Teaching Award (2007)
Kemp Strother CREOG Award (2001)
Kemp Strother CREOG Award (1998)
Wyeth-Ayerst Resident Reporter (1995)

Affiliations ?

Dr. Zaretsky is affiliated with 29 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Plano
    6200 W Parker Rd, Plano, TX 75093
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - St. Paul
    5909 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • UT Southwestern University Hospital - Zale Lipshy
    5151 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Methodist Dallas Medical Center
    3500 W Wheatland Rd, Dallas, TX 75237
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Baylor Medical Center At Irving
    1901 N MacArthur Blvd, Irving, TX 75061
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Harris Methodist H E B
    1600 Hospital Pkwy, Bedford, TX 76022
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Southwest Fort Worth
    6100 Harris Pkwy, Fort Worth, TX 76132
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Texas Health Harris Methodist Hospital Azle
    108 Denver Trl, Azle, TX 76020
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Children's Medical Center of Dallas
    Obstetrician & Gynecologist
    1935 Motor St, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Medical Center Of Lewisville
    500 W Main St, Lewisville, TX 75057
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Denton Hospital
    3000 N Interstate 35, Denton, TX 76201
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Centennial Medical Center
    12505 Lebanon Rd, Frisco, TX 75035
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Medical Center Of Plano
    3901 W 15th St, Plano, TX 75075
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Baylor Medical Center at Carrollton
    4343 N Josey Ln, Carrollton, TX 75010
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Parkland Health & Hospital System
    5201 Harry Hines Blvd, Dallas, TX 75235
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Ut Southwestern Dallas/Parkland
  • Texas Health
  • Texas Health Flower Mound
  • Texas Health Denton
  • Presbyterian Of Allen
  • Texas Health Plano
  • Texas Health Allen
  • Ut Southwestern DallasParkland
  • Medical Center Of Mckinney
    4500 Medical Center Dr, McKinney, TX 75069
  • North Central Medical Center - West Park Campus
    130 S Central Expy, McKinney, TX 75070
  • TX Health Dallas
  • Harris Continued Care Hospital
    1301 Pennsylvania Ave, Fort Worth, TX 76104
  • Parkland Health and Hospital System
  • Harris Methodist - Springwood
    1608 Hospital Pkwy, Bedford, TX 76022
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Zaretsky has contributed to 11 publications.
    Title The Appendix in Pregnancy: Confirming Historical Observations with a Contemporary Modality.
    Date December 2009
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    To estimate the position of the appendix in term pregnancy using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique.

    Title Comparison of Fetal Biometric Values with Sonographic and 3d Reconstruction Mri in Term Gestations.
    Date August 2008
    Journal Ajr. American Journal of Roentgenology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: We sought to compare the fetal biometric values head and abdominal circumferences, biparietal and occipital-frontal diameters, and left and right ventricular atrial diameters obtained with contemporaneous sonography and 3D MRI reconstructions in term pregnancies. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A total of 107 nulliparous women evaluated as having uncomplicated pregnancies and scheduled for induction at 42 completed weeks gave their informed consent and underwent MRI and sonography within 3 hours of each other. Two single-shot fast spin-echo MRI sequences were performed with 7- and 4-mm slice thicknesses and no gap. A single observer performed MRI postprocessing to obtain biometric values. A single sonographer using a 3- to 5-MHz curvilinear transducer performed transabdominal sonography. Concordance correlation and Bland-Altman analysis of differences were performed. RESULTS: Concordance correlation was poor for both right (0.024) and left (0.005) ventricular atrial diameters. There were moderate concordance correlations for head (0.56) and abdominal (0.53) circumferences and biparietal diameter (0.61). Occipital-frontal diameter had fair correlation (0.27). CONCLUSION: Comparison between contemporaneous sonographic and 3D reconstructed MR images at late gestational ages shows acceptable correlation between the two techniques for head circumference, abdominal circumference, and biparietal diameter.

    Title Determining Cervical Ripeness and Labor Outcome: the Efficacy of Magnetic Resonance T2 Relaxation Times.
    Date February 2007
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the magnetic resonance assessment of cervical water content using the T2 relaxation time correlated with cervical ripening, as evidenced by the time to onset of spontaneous labor, need for induction, and the incidence of cesarean delivery in women whose pregnancy reached 41 weeks of gestation. METHODS: The cervical T2 relaxation time was calculated from magnetic resonance data obtained in a previous study of magnetic resonance pelvimetry. After consent was obtained, the patients underwent a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol consisting of a dual fast spin echo T2-weighted scan. From images of a single slice, the cervical T2 relaxation time was calculated from two different regions of interest (anterior and posterior) on the cervix. The average cervical T2 relaxation time was then correlated to obstetric outcomes linked with cervical ripening. RESULTS: A total of 119 patients gave their consent for the study. Of these patients, 93 had optimal imaging of the cervical stroma and were included in the analysis. There was no significant correlation between the cervical T2 relaxation time and any individual component of the Bishop score or the total score. The cervical T2 relaxation time did not predict whether labor was spontaneous or induced and whether or not a woman underwent cesarean delivery. CONCLUSION: Cervical magnetic resonance T2 relaxation times did not correlate with the clinical Bishop score or predict labor outcome in our series of women whose pregnancies reached 41 weeks of gestation. Quantifying the magnetic resonance T2 relaxation time does not appear to be useful in the assessment of cervical ripening. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: III.

    Title Appearance of the Levator Ani Muscle in Pregnancy As Assessed by 3-d Mri.
    Date March 2006
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe levator ani (LA) anatomy in postterm nulliparas using 3-dimensional (3-D) magnetic resonance (MR). STUDY DESIGN: Nulliparas (n = 84) with uncomplicated, postterm pregnancies underwent an MR (4 mm slices, 0 gap) of the uterus and pelvis. LA volume and morphometry were assessed using 3-D post-processing software. RESULTS: LA insertion into the symphysis was visible in 93%, and the iliococcygeus muscle assumed a convex shape (arch) in the 92% of the 84 women. The LA shape was characterized as "U" in 53% and "V" in 47%. Mean LA volume was 13.5 (3.7) cm3. There was a positive association between LA volume and higher fetal station (P = .02) and increasing BMI (P < .001). However, no relationship between LA volume and station was found after adjusting for BMI. CONCLUSION: BMI was correlated with LA volume in postterm nulliparas. LA insertion into the symphysis and the iliococcygeus arch were well-preserved overall and morphometry was variable.

    Title Magnetic Resonance Imaging Pelvimetry and the Prediction of Labor Dystocia.
    Date February 2006
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: To study whether magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) pelvimetry has the ability to identify those women who require cesarean delivery for labor dystocia. METHODS: From July 2003 to April 2004, nulliparous women scheduled for a labor induction for prolonged pregnancy (42 weeks) were asked to participate in a pelvimetry study. Those who consented underwent fast-acquisition MRI that included two 90-second acquisitions to evaluate fetal biometry and volumetry and maternal pelvimetry, including novel measurements of pelvic bony and soft tissue volumes as determined by MRI. Information about each patient's pregnancy, labor course, and neonatal outcome was prospectively collected. Pelvimetry results for those women undergoing operative delivery for labor dystocia were compared with those who did not. Single fetal and maternal pelvic measurements, as well as ratios of both, were analyzed. In addition, previously described radiographic pelvimetry techniques and formulas to predict dystocia were used. RESULTS: One hundred one women underwent MRI, and 22 of these underwent cesarean delivery for dystocia. No single fetal measurement was statistically associated with dystocia. Several maternal pelvic measures, fetal-to-maternal ratios, and previously reported pelvimetric techniques were significantly associated with dystocia. The ratio of magnetic resonance (MR) fetal head volume to pelvic soft tissue volume had statistical significance (P = .04). Receiver operator characteristic curves were developed for the different measurements, ratios, and formulas studied to assess whether any of the techniques could accurately predict labor dystocia requiring operative delivery. The area under the curve values ranged from 0.6 to 0.8, with the ratio of MR head volume to pelvic soft tissue being 0.7. These values suggest that MRI can identify those women at greatest risk for dystocia, but it cannot with accuracy predict which ones will require a cesarean. CONCLUSION: We found significant associations with MRI pelvimetry and labor dystocia, but MRI was not a significant improvement over previously described pelvimetric techniques. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II-3.

    Title Correlation of Measured Amnionic Fluid Volume to Sonographic and Magnetic Resonance Predictions.
    Date January 2005
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to compare the relationship between the actual amnionic fluid volume that was measured at delivery and magnetic resonance amnionic fluid volume determination, largest vertical pocket, and amnionic fluid index. STUDY DESIGN: Three hours before cesarean delivery, 80 women had sonographic measurement of the amnionic fluid index and the largest vertical pocket. Magnetic resonance imaging was then completed, and the magnetic resonance amnionic fluid volume was determined. At surgery, the amnionic fluid was collected. Pearson correlations were determined. Receiver operating characteristic curves were developed for each method as a measure of predictability for oligohydramnios. RESULTS: The correlations for the magnetic resonance amnionic fluid volume, amnionic fluid index, and largest vertical pocket to amnionic fluid volume was 0.84, 0.77, and 0.71, respectively. Magnetic resonance amnionic fluid volume has a statistically higher correlation than the largest vertical pocket ( P = .046). The 3 methods, however, are statistically comparable for identifying oligohydramnios. CONCLUSION: Magnetic resonance imaging is comparable with ultrasound evaluation for the prediction of oligohydramnios. Correlations to actual amnionic fluid volume are also comparable.

    Title Transfer of Inflammatory Cytokines Across the Placenta.
    Date April 2004
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the placental transfer of interleukin (IL)-1alpha, IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) occurs. METHODS: Four normal-term placentas were perfused for maternal-fetal transfer of the cytokines, 2 placentas for fetal-maternal transfer, and 4 additional placentas were used for an endogenous control. The ex vivo isolated cotyledon human placental perfusion model was used. The reference compound antipyrine was used to determine the transport fraction and clearance index of the cytokines. The cytokines were added to either the maternal or fetal circulations, and samples were collected for 1 hour in a constant-flow open circulation. Cytokine levels were compared between the study and control placentas. Concentrations of the cytokines were measured by sandwich enzyme immunoassay. RESULTS: The clearance index for the maternal-fetal transfer of IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha was 0.001, suggesting minimal transfer to the fetal circulation. The clearance index for IL-6 was 0.30, indicating transfer to the fetal circulation. When the cytokines were added to the fetal circulation, the clearance index for IL-1alpha was 0.001, again indicating minimal transfer. The clearance index for TNF-alpha in the fetal-maternal study was not determined. IL-6 had a clearance index of 0.23, which was similar to that observed with maternal-fetal transfer. IL-6 concentrations in the study placentas were higher than the concentrations found in the controls. CONCLUSION: There appears to be bidirectional transfer of IL-6 in the healthy-term human placental perfusion model. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: II-2

    Title Single Uterine Axial Fast Acquisition Magnetic Resonance Fetal Survey: is It Feasible?
    Date January 2004
    Journal The Journal of Maternal-fetal & Neonatal Medicine : the Official Journal of the European Association of Perinatal Medicine, the Federation of Asia and Oceania Perinatal Societies, the International Society of Perinatal Obstetricians
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: To determine which non-biometric components of the ultrasound fetal survey can routinely be seen on a single fast acquisition magnetic resonance (MR) sequence aligned axial to the maternal uterus. STUDY DESIGN: The non-biometric components of the routine fetal ultrasound examination were applied retrospectively to the initial MR single-shot fast spin-echo acquisition aligned axial to the maternal uterus in the normal fetus to determine whether these parameters could be routinely evaluated. Nineteen women with anatomically normal fetuses had a total of 31 MR studies performed for fetal or maternal indications, either as part of an indicated examination or as part of a study protocol approved by the institutional review board. The images in these 31 MR studies were reviewed by two independent examiners who were blinded to the other's assessment; concordance was necessary for a component to be adequately assessed. The Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to determine the effect of gestational age and fetal lie on the ability to assess non-biometric parameters. RESULTS: Assessment was possible in 85% of the non-biometric parameters. Cord insertion, external genitalia and the four-chamber view of the heart were most problematic. In only two cases was the four-chamber view of the heart identified. Longitudinal lie allowed significantly more parameters (82%) to be evaluated than transverse lie (45%) (p < 0.003). No difference based on gestational age was found. CONCLUSION: A single fast acquisition axial MR sequence can evaluate 85% of the non-biometric components of the fetal ultrasound survey. Fetal lie is an important confounder in the ability to resolve fetal anatomy with a single MR axial uterine acquisition.

    Title Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Obstetrics.
    Date January 2004
    Journal Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Title Feasibility of the Fetal Anatomic and Maternal Pelvic Survey by Magnetic Resonance Imaging at Term.
    Date December 2003
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to determine which nonbiometric components of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended ultrasound fetal anatomic and maternal pelvic survey can be evaluated by fast acquisition magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the term fetus. STUDY DESIGN: Nonbiometric components of the fetal survey were retrospectively evaluated by fast acquisition MR images. Thirteen components were assessed, including fetal number, presentation, placental location, qualitative assessment of amniotic fluid, and the maternal pelvis (n=5). The fetal anatomy included bilateral cerebral ventricles, spine, bilateral kidneys, stomach, bladder, cord insertion, sex, and four-chamber view of the heart (n=8). Studies were performed before delivery and neonatal outcomes were reviewed. RESULTS: All 50 neonates were normal at follow-up. A total of 94% (702 of 750) of the components were assessed by MR imaging. CONCLUSION: Fetal MR imaging can assess 94% of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommended ultrasound fetal and pelvic anatomic survey. If the heart is excluded, this increases to 99%.

    Title Comparison of Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Ultrasound in the Estimation of Birth Weight at Term.
    Date December 2003
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to compare magnetic resonance (MR) and ultrasound (US) fetal weight estimates obtained immediately before delivery with birth weight. STUDY DESIGN: Eighty women scheduled for a cesarean delivery underwent a fast acquisition MR and US for fetal weight estimation within 3 hours of delivery. Prospective MR calculation was based on the equation 0.12+1.031 g/mLxfetal volume (mL)=MR weight (g). US fetal weight estimation was calculated by the formula by Hadlock et al. Estimations were compared with birth weight. RESULTS: Correlation (95% CI) between birth weight and MR weight is 0.95 with a mean absolute error of 129 g (105-155) compared with the correlation between birth weight and US of 0.85 with a mean absolute error of 225 g (186-264). The correlation for birth weight and MR imaging is significantly greater than that of birth weight and US, P<.001. CONCLUSION: Birth weight estimation is more accurate by MR imaging than by US in term infants.

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