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Colorectal Surgeon (colon & rectum), Surgical Specialist
20 years of experience
Video profile

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
University of Southern California (1990)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Appointments
University of Southern California School of Medicine
Assistant Professor of Clinical
Associations
American Board of Colon and Rectal Surgery

Affiliations ?

Dr. Vukasin is affiliated with 3 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Glendale Memorial Hospital and Health Center
    1420 S Central Ave, Glendale, CA 91204
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Methodist Hospital of Southern California
    300 W Huntington Dr, Arcadia, CA 91007
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Verdugo Hills Hospital
    1812 Verdugo Blvd, Glendale, CA 91208
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Vukasin has contributed to 25 publications.
    Title Adenocarcinoma Arising in the Middle of Ileoanal Pouches: Report of Five Cases.
    Date April 2009
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    Restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis with or without mucosectomy has become the procedure of choice in patients with long-standing ulcerative colitis complicated by malignancy or medically refractory disease and for familial polyposis syndrome. Some reports have demonstrated the development of malignancy at the ileoanal anastomosis. We present a recent series of five patients who developed adenocarcinoma in the middle of their ileal pouch including the first case of pouch carcinoma in a patient who underwent pouch formation for ulcerative colitis. We discuss their presentation and management. Development of ileal pouch cancers, while rare, has been seen with increasing frequency in our practice. Patients with long-standing ileal pouches may benefit from routine surveillance of the pouch as often as every six months, which can be performed quickly and easily in the office using flexible endoscopy.

    Title Morbidity of Ostomy Takedown.
    Date May 2008
    Journal Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery : Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: Creation of a temporary ostomy is a surgical tool to divert stool from a more distal area of concern (anastomosis, inflammation, etc). To provide a true benefit, the morbidity/mortality from the ostomy takedown itself should be minimal. The aim of our study was therefore to evaluate our own experience and determine the complications and mortality of stoma closure in relation to the type and location of the respective ostomy. METHODS: Patients undergoing an elective takedown of a temporary ostomy at our teaching institution between January 1999 and July 2005 were included in our analysis, and the medical records were retrospectively reviewed. Excluded were only patients with relevant chart deficiencies and nonelective stoma revisions/takedowns. Data collected included general demographics; the type and location of the stoma; the operative technique; and the type, timing, and impact of complications. Perioperative morbidity was defined as complications occurring within 30 days from the operation. RESULTS: 156 patients (median age 45 years, range 18-85) were included in the analysis: 31 loop and 59 end colostomy reversals and 56 loop and 10 end ileostomy takedowns. Mean follow-up was 6 months. The overall mortality rate was low (0.65%, 1/156 patients). However, the morbidity rate was 36.5% (57 patients), with 6 (3.8%) systemic complications and 51 (32.7%) local complications. Minor would infection (34 patients, 21.8%) and postoperative ileus (9 patients, 5.7%) were the most common surgery-related complications, but they generally resolved with conservative management. Anastomotic leak and formation/persistence of an enterocutaneous fistula (6 patients, 3.8%) were the most serious local complications and required reintervention in all of the patients. Closure of a loop colostomy accounted for half and Hartmann reversals for one third of these complications, as opposed to ileostomy takedowns, which accounted for only one sixth (1.8% absolute risk). CONCLUSION: Takedown of a temporary ostomy has a low mortality but a nonnegligible morbidity. The stoma location (large vs. small bowel) has a higher impact than the type of stoma construction (end vs. loop) on the incidence and severity of complications.

    Title Questions About Efficacy of Continuous Wound Catheters.
    Date November 2007
    Journal Journal of the American College of Surgeons
    Title Delayed Rectovaginal Fistula: a Potential Complication of Bevacizumab (avastin).
    Date July 2007
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Title Fistula-in-ano: Do Antibiotics Make a Difference?
    Date March 2007
    Journal International Journal of Colorectal Disease
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to evaluate the hypothesis that antibiotics in conjunction with drainage of anorectal abscesses will reduce the incidence of fistulae formation. The impact of age and associated comorbidity on the formation of fistulae were also evaluated. METHODS: Patients with a diagnosis of anorectal abscesses were identified from the database of a single colorectal practice. Demographic data, comorbidity, antibiotic usage, and fistulae formation were collected from review of patient's charts and phone contact. Statistical analysis was performed with the two-sided Fisher's exact and Wald's chi-square tests. RESULTS: Fifty-six patients with complete data were analyzed. The overall fistulae formation rate was 32%. Of all patients, 45% received a course of broad-spectrum antibiotics at the time of drainage and 48% of patients had associated comorbidity. Although trends were evident, there were no statistical significant associations between fistulae formation and age, comorbidity, and antibiotics. CONCLUSION: Although not statistically significant, there was a trend that antibiotics and age >45 years may be protective against the formation of fistulae. Similarly, the data suggest that the presence of comorbidity may increase the risk of fistula formation. We are encouraged by this result and propose to conduct a larger randomized prospective study.

    Title Molecular Predictors of Lymph Node Metastasis in Colon Cancer: Increased Risk with Decreased Thymidylate Synthase Expression.
    Date July 2006
    Journal Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery : Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
    Excerpt

    TNM staging in colon cancer has several limitations. Prognostic molecular markers are now being developed to address these limitations. The aim of this study was to identify a combination of genes and markers whose expression is predictive of nodal status and outcome in colon cancer. The expression of 12 genetic markers were examined in 66 node-positive and 65 node-negative T3 colon cancers. Gene expression was quantified using real-time polymerase chain reaction. Microsatellite instability status was available through the registry. Association with lymph node status was examined using univariate and multivariate logistic regression. Thymidylate synthase expression was statistically significantly associated with lymph node status (odds ratio 0.36; 95% confidence interval: 0.16-0.81). Microsatellite instability and the other genes were not associated with nodal status. Multiple logistic regression did not identify a significant multivariate predictive model. Decreased expression of thymidylate synthase is associated with a higher risk of lymph node metastasis in patients with T3 colon cancers. Microsatellite instability and the expression of other genes are not predictive of nodal status in this population. Thymidylate synthase gene expression may help identify patients at greater risk for progression of disease.

    Title Cost-saving Effect of Treatment Algorithm for Chronic Anal Fissure: a Prospective Analysis.
    Date July 2006
    Journal Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery : Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
    Excerpt

    Evidence-based medicine suggests that in the management of chronic anal fissure (CAF), lateral internal sphincterotomy (LIS) is far more effective than medical treatment in lowering the anal sphincter tone and curing the fissure. In the current study, we developed a treatment algorithm from topical nitroglycerin (NTG) to botulinum toxin type A (Botox [BTX]) to LIS and analyzed its cost benefit by calculating the effective and potential costs based on the treatment success and the rate of avoided surgeries. Patients presenting between November 2003 and December 2004 with CAF and symptoms for greater than 3 months were prospectively treated according to a treatment algorithm which started with (1) topical NTG, in case of failure (2) injection of BTX, thus limiting (3) surgery to those who failed both nonsurgical options or at any point chose the surgical approach. Based on the primary end points of fissure healing or surgery, we calculated the true cost (algorithm) and the potential incremental cost (BTX plus surgery or surgery in all patients, respectively). Sixty-seven patients with CAF (25 men and 42 women; median duration of symptoms, 16 weeks) were treated according to the algorithm. NTG alone was successful in fissure healing in 31 of 67 patients (46.2%). Two developed a recurrent fissure and then received BTX as part of the protocol. Of the 36 patients who failed NTG trial, 3 requested surgery; the others were treated with BTX, which was successful in 84.8%. Five patients (15.2%) failed BTX and subsequently required surgery. The overall surgery rate in the whole study group was 11.9%, whereas CAF healed in 88.1% of our patients with medical treatment alone. Cost for NTG is $10; for 100 units BTX, $528; and for outpatient surgery, $1119. The total cost for these 67 patients therefore was $33,252 ($290 for NTG, $20,580 for NTG plus BTX, $3,357 for NTG plus LIS, and $9,025 for NTG plus BTX plus LIS). If all patients had received BTX with a 15% failure rate, the total cost would have been $56,688 (70.3% cost increase). If all patients had undergone surgery as initial/only treatment, the total cost would have been $74,973 (125% cost increase). Our treatment algorithm for CAF with stepwise escalation can avoid surgery in 88% of the patients. It is highly cost-efficient and resulted in savings of 41% (compared with BTX plus LIS) and up to 70% (compared with surgery in all patients), respectively.

    Title Intraoperative Physical Diagnosis in the Management of Anal Fistula.
    Date March 2006
    Journal The American Surgeon
    Excerpt

    This report reviews a prospective database applying a systematic fistulomy technique in 101 patients requiring surgery for fistula in ano at LAC+USC Medical Center during a 15-month period. Data were collected for the reliability of primary crypt palpation, success of tract injection with peroxide/methylene blue, and the accuracy of Goodsall's rule. Time to healing, recurrence, and incontinence according to type of procedure were also recorded. Palpation of the primary crypt was possible in 93 per cent. Hydrogen peroxide/methylene blue injection successfully delineated the tract in 83 per cent. Goodsall's rule was correct in 81 per cent. Each fistula was categorized as intersphincteric (n = 72), transphincteric (n = 33), extrasphincteric (n = 1), or submucosal (n = 6). At a mean follow-up period of 44 weeks, 89.2 per cent of patients were cured. Reasons for recurrence included wound bridging (n = 6), misdiagnosis of the tract (n = 3), and two blind-ended fistulae (n = 2). Time to healing in weeks was (mean, range): simple fistulotomy (12, 3-21), seton (16, 4-28), Hanley procedure (28, 8-48). Patients with a marsupialized tract healed at an average of 6 weeks (range 4-8). Four (3.9%) patients reported postoperative incontinence (1 gas, 3 liquid, 0 solids).

    Title Laparoscopic-assisted Vs. Open Colectomy for Colon Cancer: a Prospective Randomized Trial.
    Date April 2005
    Journal Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: Although laparoscopic-assisted colectomy (LAC) has evolved as a technical option in the treatment of benign colonic diseases, its role in the treatment of malignancies remains controversial. The purpose of this prospective randomized trial was to compare perioperative parameters and outcomes between LAC vs. open colectomy (OC) in patients with stage I-III colon cancer. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Eligible patients with colon cancer who were scheduled for an elective colon resection from January 1995 to February 2001 were randomized to either the LAC or the OC treatment group. The two groups were compared with regard to operative time, blood loss, complications, pathologic findings and lymph node yield, length of postoperative hospital stay, gastrointestinal function, use of analgesic drugs, recurrence, and survival rates. The median follow-up was 35 months (range, 3-69 months). RESULTS: A total of 49 patients were enrolled in the study: 20 were randomized to OC and 29 to LAC, one of whom was lost to follow-up. Thirteen patients in the LAC group had to be converted to OC (COC), and were analyzed in a separate group. The three patient groups were comparable with regard to age, gender distribution, tumor site, lymph node harvest, operative procedure, anastomotic type, perioperative complication, recurrence, and survival rates. Tumor margins were clear in all patients. No incidence of port-site recurrence in the LAC group, or wound recurrence in the OC and COC groups, was found. Three patients died of cancer-related causes, one in each patient group. The LAC patients had significantly shorter hospital stay, faster recovery of gastrointestinal function, and less use of intravenous analgesia. CONCLUSION: Short-term outcomes revealed that LAC could be performed safely and has therapeutic results similar to OC for colon cancer. Conversion of LAC to an open procedure was frequent but was not associated with a negative outcome.

    Title Effect of High-dose Steroids on Anastomotic Complications After Proctocolectomy with Ileal Pouch-anal Anastomosis.
    Date January 2005
    Journal Journal of Gastrointestinal Surgery : Official Journal of the Society for Surgery of the Alimentary Tract
    Excerpt

    This review was designed to determine whether "high-dose" steroid therapy (> or =20 mg prednisone/day) increases the likelihood of anastomotic complications after restorative proctocolectomy with ileal pouch-anal anastomosis (IPAA). The hospital records of 100 patients undergoing proctocolectomy with IPAA were reviewed. Patient characteristics were analyzed to determine what factors were associated with higher rates of anastomosis-related complications. Seventy-one of our patients were given diverting ileostomies, whereas the remaining 29 underwent a single-stage procedure. Fifty-four percent of the patients in our review were taking steroids preoperatively, 39 of whom were on high-dose therapy. The overall anastomosis-related complication rate was 14%. There was no significant difference in complication rates with respect to age, steroid use, steroid dose, use of a diverting ileostomy, type of anastomosis, duration of disease, or presence of backwash ileitis. A trend toward higher leakage rates was found in patients undergoing single-stage procedures (10.3% vs. 2.8%, P=0.14) as well as in patients undergoing single-stage procedures on high-dose steroids (22% vs. 5.0, P=0.22). Nevertheless, neither of these trends was found to be statistically significant, which was likely influenced by the small sample size. Our data suggest that there may be an increase in anastomotic leakage rates in patients on high-dose steroids undergoing a single-stage proctocolectomy with IPAA. Nevertheless, our rate was not as high as the rates seen by other investigators and did not reach statistical significance. During preoperative counseling, patients on high-dose steroids should be informed of this uncertain but real risk of anastomotic leakage.

    Title Anorectal Pathology in Hiv/aids-infected Patients Has Not Been Impacted by Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy.
    Date November 2004
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to determine if the prevalence and distribution of anorectal pathology in HIV-infected patients treated by colorectal surgeons have changed after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. METHODS: The Los Angeles County-University of Southern California HIV Clinic is solely dedicated to the care of HIV patients. A colorectal clinic was established within this environment in 1991 and has served as the exclusive provider for the care of anorectal pathology in these patients. A prospective database of patients treated at this clinic was reviewed for two 18-month periods. The first group (early period) was composed of patients treated between January 1994 through June 1995, before the institution of more effective antiretroviral therapy. The second group (later period) consisted of patients treated between January 2001 through June 2002, after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy. Data were tabulated for HIV-related anorectal pathologies, such as anal ulcer and anogenital condyloma, and non-HIV-related pathologies, including fissure, fistula in ano, hemorrhoids, perianal abscess, and other pathologies, for each of the two time periods. RESULTS: A total of 117 individual patients with anorectal pathology were treated in the early period and 109 received care in the later period, of which 107 were able to be evaluated. The pathology was distributed as follows for the early vs. late periods: 33 vs. 33 percent for ulcer, 30 vs. 34 percent for condyloma, 9 vs. 4 percent for fissure, 6 vs. 6 percent for fistula, 4 vs. 5 percent for hemorrhoids, 3 vs. 3 percent for abscess, and 15 vs. 16 percent for all other anorectal pathology. There was no statistically significant difference in any of these groups. CONCLUSION: The prevalence and distribution of both HIV-related and non-HIV-related anorectal pathology seen in our HIV patients have not been altered by the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Title Internet Use by Colorectal Surgery Patients: a Surgeon's Tool for Education and Marketing.
    Date July 2004
    Journal The American Surgeon
    Excerpt

    The goal of this study is to understand the role of the Internet in the education and recruitment of patients within colorectal surgery practices. Surveys of Internet use were completed by 298 patients visiting five outpatient colorectal surgery clinics affiliated with the University of Southern California. Data collected included the patient's age, gender, level of education, zip code at home, type of clinic visited, and information on the respondent's Internet use. Overall, 20 per cent of the respondent patients visiting our clinics had used the Internet to research the medical condition that prompted their visit. Highest grade level completed (P < 0.001), age (P < 0.01), type of clinic (P < 0.001), and household income (P < 0.001) were all found to be associated with any prior use of the Internet whereas gender was not (P = 0.58). Among Internet users, only household income and frequent use of the Internet were associated with searching the Internet for medical information (P < 0.001). Ultimately, all of the Internet-using patients surveyed felt the medical information they found was "some what" or "very helpful." Understanding which patients "go online" to search for medical information is essential for surgeons who wish to use the Internet for marketing their practices and educating their patients.

    Title Self-expanding Metallic Stents in the Management of Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage.
    Date June 2004
    Journal Journal of Laparoendoscopic & Advanced Surgical Techniques. Part A
    Excerpt

    A case of an 82-year-old woman is reported who developed a lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage secondary to metastatic ovarian carcinoma to the colon. The bleeding, associated with an incomplete obstruction of the large bowel, was successfully treated with the endoscopic insertion of two self-expanding metal stents. A technique of stent placement is presented which differs from that previously reported, where both stents were via colonoscopy and without the use of fluoroscopy.

    Title Sequential Compression Devices As Prophylaxis for Venous Thromboembolism in High-risk Colorectal Surgery Patients: Reconsidering American Society of Colorectal Surgeons Parameters.
    Date December 2003
    Journal The American Surgeon
    Excerpt

    The American Society of Colorectal Surgeons (ASCRS) recently endorsed low-molecular-weight heparin and low-dose heparin as primary prophylaxis for venous thromboembolism (VTE) in highest-risk patients. Our study evaluates the feasibility of sequential compression device (SCD) use for VTE prophylaxis in these patients. Computerized databases of discharge diagnoses from three hospitals were reviewed. All patients with colorectal cancer or inflammatory bowel disease during a 7-year period were identified. Those who underwent major abdominal surgery and received VTE prophylaxis exclusively with SCDs were selected for the study. Patients diagnosed with postoperative VTE were identified through review of the three databases and of patient records for 90 days after surgery. One thousand two hundred eighty-one patients classified as highest-risk under the published ASCRS parameters underwent major abdominal surgery and received SCDs perioperatively. The incidence of clinically detectable postoperative VTE was 0.78 per cent. There were trends toward lower incidence among patients with malignancy (0.53%) compared with inflammatory bowel disease (1.48%, P = 0.09), and those with abdominal compared to pelvic procedures (0.62% vs. 1.04%, P = 0.41). Prophylaxis for perioperative VTE solely with SCD is a viable option for patients classified as highest-risk under ASCRS parameters.

    Title Use of High-dose-rate Brachytherapy in the Management of Locally Recurrent Rectal Cancer.
    Date September 2003
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    INTRODUCTION: Locally recurrent rectal cancer is associated with poor quality of life and has justified aggressive surgical and adjuvant approaches to control the disease. This study was designed to evaluate the use of fractionated perioperative high-dose-rate brachytherapy in association with wide surgical excision (debulking). Our hypothesis is that this combined therapy can help control locally recurrent rectal cancer. METHODS: Patients with biopsy-proven locally recurrent rectal cancer that could not be completely removed surgically were considered candidates for this procedure. All patients had abdominal exploration, aggressive tumor debulking, and placement of afterloading brachytherapy catheters. Patients underwent simulation on postoperative Day 3 and received 1,200 to 2,500 (mean, 1,888) cGy of fractionated high-dose-rate brachytherapy between postoperative Days 3 and 5. All patients had involvement of the lateral pelvic sidewall and/or the sacrum. RESULTS: Twenty-seven patients (18 males) aged 32 to 79 years underwent therapy. Follow-up ranged from 18 to 93 (mean, 50) months and was available in 27 patients. Ten patients (37 percent) were alive at the time of this report. Nine patients are without evidence of disease. Five patients (18 percent) died of non-cancer-related causes without evidence of recurrent disease. Five complications potentially related to treatment (3 abscesses, 2 fistulas) occurred in five patients. CONCLUSION: High-dose radiation brachytherapy delivers high-dose, highly controlled, focused radiation to specific sites of disease, thereby minimizing injury to normal tissues. The results in this series suggest increased local control, better palliation, and increased salvage of patients.

    Title Anal Condyloma and Hiv-associated Anal Disease.
    Date January 2003
    Journal The Surgical Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Although there are a large variety of anal diagnoses associated with the HIV population, anal condyloma and anal ulcerations make up the vast majority. A large percentage of individuals having multiple concurrent pathologies should also be noted. Thus, this article concentrates on anal condyloma, anal ulceration and HIV, making note of other significant issues.

    Title Placement of Self-expanding Metal Stents for Acute Malignant Large-bowel Obstruction: a Collective Review.
    Date September 2002
    Journal Annals of Surgical Oncology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to review our experience with self-expanding metal stents as the initial interventional approach in the management of acute malignant large-bowel obstruction. METHODS: Twenty-six patients who underwent placement of colonic stents at our institution between June 1994 and June 2000 were identified and reviewed. RESULTS: In 14 patients, the stents were placed for palliation, whereas in 12, they were placed as a bridge to surgery. In 22 patients (85%), stent placement was successful on the first occasion. In the remaining four individuals, one was successfully stented at the second occasion, and three required emergency surgery. Nine of the 12 patients (75%) in the bridge-to-surgery group underwent elective colon resection. In the palliative group, four patients (29%) had reobstruction of the stents, and in one (9%), the stent migrated. In the remaining nine patients (64%), the stent was patent until the patient died or until the time of last follow-up (median, 156 days). CONCLUSIONS: In our experience with 26 patients who developed a complete bowel obstruction as a consequence of a malignant tumor, placement of colonic stents to achieve immediate nonoperative decompression proved to be both safe and effective. Subsequent elective resection was accomplished in the majority of resectable cases.

    Title The Wand Local Anesthetic Delivery System: a More Pleasant Experience for Anal Anesthesia.
    Date June 2001
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: The WAND is a computer-controlled local anesthetic delivery system. Its use has been proven to be more comfortable for dental patients. The purpose of this study is to explore its applicability to anal procedures. Our hypothesis is that the WAND will provide greater comfort during anesthesia delivery while achieving the same anesthetic effect as traditional syringe technique. METHODS: Twenty patients with painless anal pathology were randomized to receive anal anesthesia using either the WAND or traditional syringe technique to a randomly selected half of the anoderm (right or left). The opposite side was then anesthetized by the alternate method, allowing patients to act as their own control. Objective and subjective pain scores were obtained from the patient after each mode of delivery. An independent observer interpreted the patient's tolerance by giving a subjective pain score. The volume of anesthetic used was recorded. Adequacy of anesthesia was tested by a pinch test. RESULTS: Sixteen (80 percent) of the 20 patients preferred the use of the WAND. Objective and subjective pain scores per the patients and subjective pain scores per the observer were significantly lower for the WAND than for traditional syringe technique (P < 0.05). The mean volume of local anesthetic used with the WAND was 1.7 ml compared with 3.2 ml for traditional syringe technique (P < 0.005). Anesthesia achieved with the WAND was as good as that achieved with traditional syringe technique when the pinch test was used. CONCLUSION: The WAND is as effective as the traditional syringe technique in the delivery of anal anesthesia while providing a more comfortable experience for the patient.

    Title Follow-up of Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis.
    Date October 1998
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: The value of intensive follow-up for patients after resection of colorectal cancer remains controversial. This study reviews all randomized and prospective cohort studies to assess the value of aggressive follow-up. METHODS: The literature was searched from the years 1972 to 1996 for studies reporting on the follow-up of patients with colorectal cancer. Randomized and comparative-cohort studies that included history, physical examination, and carcinoembrionic antigen values at least three times a year for at least two years were included in a meta-analysis. Single-cohort studies with intensive follow-up and traditional follow-up were also included in a two-group comparative analysis for each outcome indicator. Outcome indicators were 1) curative resection rates after recurrent cancer, 2) survival rates of curative re-resections, 3) length of survival after recurrence, and 4) cumulative five-year survival. RESULTS: Two randomized and three comparative-cohort studies met these criteria and included 2,005 patients, which were evaluated in the meta-analysis. The cumulative five-year survival was 1.16 times higher in the intensively followed group (P = 0.003). Two and one-half times more curative re-resections were performed for recurrent cancer in those patients undergoing intensive follow-up (P = 0.0001). Those patients in the intensive follow-up group with a recurrence had a 3.62-times higher survival rate than the control (P = 0.0004). Fourteen single-cohort studies were also included in the comparative analysis of 6,641 patients. The findings from these aggregated studies support the results of the meta-analysis. CONCLUSION: Our study concludes that intensive follow-up detects more recurrent cancers at a stage amenable to curative resection, resulting in an improvement in survival of recurrences and an increased overall five-year cumulative rate of survival.

    Title New Technique for Mesh Repair of Paracolostomy Hernias.
    Date September 1998
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    Paracolostomy hernias are common and require treatment when symptomatic. Traditional methods of repair have high recurrence rates. We describe a new technique using polytetrafluoroethylene mesh, which offers preservation of stoma site, lack of recurrences, ease, and safety.

    Title Prevalence and Distribution of Anorectal Misdiagnoses.
    Date August 1998
    Journal The Western Journal of Medicine
    Title Variations in Treatment of Rectal Cancer: the Influence of Hospital Type and Caseload.
    Date July 1997
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: Surgical options for the treatment of rectal cancer may involve sphincter-sparing procedures (SSP) or abdominoperineal resection (APR). We sought to examine variations in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer for a large, well-defined patient population and specifically to determine if differences exist in management and survival based on hospital type and surgical caseload. METHODS: The Cancer Surveillance Program database for Los Angeles County was used to retrospectively retrieve data on all patients who underwent SSP or APR for rectal adenocarcinoma between 1988 and 1992. RESULTS: A total of 2,006 patients with adenocarcinoma of the rectum underwent SSP or APR during the study period. Overall, 55 percent underwent SSP, and the remaining 45 percent underwent APR. Use of SSP remained relatively constant for each year of the five-year period. Substantial variability was seen in the use of SSP at various hospital types. For localized disease, this varied from as low as 52 percent at teaching hospitals to as high as 78 percent at hospitals approved by the American College of Surgeons (P = 0.067). To examine the role of caseload experience, hospitals were divided into those completing an average of five or fewer rectal cancer cases per year vs. those completing an average of more than five cases per year. For localized disease, hospitals with higher caseloads performed SSP in significantly more cases, 69 vs. 63 percent (P = 0.049). Survival was seen to be significantly improved for patients operated on at hospitals with higher caseloads, in cases of both localized and regional diseases (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: Surgical choices in the treatment of rectal cancer may vary widely, even in a well-defined geographic region. Although the reasons for this variability are multifactorial, hospital environment and surgical caseload experience seem to have a significant role in the choice of surgical procedure and on survival.

    Title Oral Fleet Phospho-soda Laxative-induced Hyperphosphatemia and Hypocalcemic Tetany in an Adult: Report of a Case.
    Date April 1997
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: This study was undertaken to report an adverse outcome of the routine use of Fleets Phospho-Soda for bowel cleansing and to review the available literature. METHOD: Report of a case and review of the literature is presented. RESULT: Administration of Fleets Phospho-Soda for bowel preparation in an adult resulted in hyperphosphatemia and hypocalcemic tetany. Review of the literature shows this to be the first such report. Further evaluation suggests a role for partial bowel obstruction and renal failure in this complication. CONCLUSION: Although Fleet Phospho-Soda solution continues to be a safe bowel preparation, caution should be used in adults with bowel obstruction and renal failure.

    Title Wound Recurrence Following Laparoscopic Colon Cancer Resection. Results of the American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons Laparoscopic Registry.
    Date October 1996
    Journal Diseases of the Colon and Rectum
    Excerpt

    INTRODUCTION: Multiple case reports have suggested that laparoscopic resection of colon cancer may alter the pattern or incidence of cancer recurrence. All reports lack a significant denominator to evaluate the incidence of surgical wound recurrence. We hypothesized that wound recurrence incidence is not increased by laparoscopic resection of colon cancer. METHODS: A prospective registry was initiated under the auspices of The American Society of colon and Rectal Surgeons, American College of Surgeons, and Society of American Gastrointestinal Endoscopic Surgeons in 1992. Patients having laparoscopic colon resection were voluntarily entered and followed until June 1995. Recurrences were evaluated by the primary surgeon and reported to the registry. RESULTS: A total of 504 patients treated for cancer were identified in the registry. A minimum follow-up of one year was obtained for 480 of 493 evaluable patients (97.4 percent). Wound recurrence was identified in five patients (1.1 percent). Recurrence status was unknown in 18 patients (3.8 percent). CONCLUSION: Wound recurrence rates appear to be low. Although length of follow-up is limited, patterns of recurrence from previous studies suggest that 80 percent of recurrences should have occurred within one year. Given the limitations of a Phase II study, the hypothesis that recurrence rate is low is supported. However, prospective randomized trials are needed to establish if any difference in wound recurrence rates after laparoscopic or open resection of colorectal cancer exists.

    Title On the Location in the Thrombin B Chain of Substrate Recognition Sites for Fibrinopeptide Release and Factor Xiii Activation.
    Date October 1989
    Journal Thrombosis Research
    Excerpt

    Thrombin, a serine proteinase comprised of two disulfide-linked subunits (A chain and B chain), induces clotting by releasing fibrinopeptide A from fibrinogen and then influences the character of the resulting fibrin by releasing fibrinopeptide B and by activating factor XIII. While the active center of thrombin is known to reside in its B chain, the subunit location of the structural determinants that govern the specific release of fibrinopeptides A and B and the activation of factor XIII have not been established. We have investigated the subunit location within the thrombin molecule of the determinants of substrate specificity for these actions using an isolated, immobilized B-chain preparation. Isolated B chain was prepared by covalently linking the intact thrombin molecule to Sepharose beads via the carbohydrate chain attached to asparagine 53 of its B chain, then reducing the single interchain disulfide bond to release the A chain, and finally reoxidizing the intrachain disulfide bonds of the immobilized B chain, allowing it to refold. The isolated, immobilized B chain of thrombin induced clotting of purified fibrinogen, releasing both fibrinopeptides A and B as demonstrated by HPLC and by electrophoresis of reduced fibrin chains. In addition, the B-chain preparation activated added factor XIII, yielding electrophoretically characteristic cross-linked fibrin chains.

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