Neurological Surgeons, Surgical Specialist
21 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
2845 Greenbrier Rd
Suite 330
Green Bay, WI 54311
920-288-8350
Locations and availability (9)

Patient Reviews ?

Overall Rating:
3.0
  • Currently 3 of 4 stars
Total Ratings

4

Total Reviews

1

Ratings
4 stars
3 stars
2 stars
1 star
Ease of Appointment:
  • Currently 3.5 of 4 stars
Promptness:
  • Currently 3.5 of 4 stars
Courteous Staff:
  • Currently 3 of 4 stars
Accurate Diagnosis:
  • Currently 2.75 of 4 stars
Bedside Manner:
  • Currently 2.75 of 4 stars
Spends Time with Me:
  • Currently 2.75 of 4 stars
Follows Up After Visit:
  • Currently 2.5 of 4 stars
Average Wait: 15 minutes
  • Currently 1 of 4 stars
 |  How Richard Harrison destroyed my life  |  show details
by Michael James Paquet II on Jan 6th, 2012

When I was 17 years old, I started seeing Harrison (in 2007) for a herniated disc in my lower back (L4/L5). The condition was caused by a car accident in 2004 that had broken my back, and left me in a coma. Thankfully, my back is the only problem I have anymore. I met with Harrison several times as means of consultation, as I had been bounced from one neurosurgeon to another for the years following the accident, and Harrison was the first doctor that I had come to who wanted to do anything for my condition. He recommended a micro-discectomy or a spinal fusion of that area in my back. I had asked him at the time if a synthetic disc could be put into my back, but he told me it was pending further approval with the FDA. Two weeks after the discectomy, I started experiencing debilitating muscle spasms in my lower back, which made it impossible for me to move. This crippled me for six months. I had a follow up appointment with Dr. Harrison a month after the surgery, which was right as the spasms I was experiencing reached the height of the pain they caused me. Harrison did as I predicted he would: he prescribed me more vicodin and a set of muscle relaxants. He did physically examine me, but didn't tell me what was actually going on.It took me 4 years to find out what really happened in the weeks following the surgery. Because my father's insurance fell out after the surgery, I was unable to see Harrison after my month follow up, and remain uninsured to this day. A doctor at the university I currently attend took pity on me, and helped me get a discounted x-ray to find out what was causing my problems. Lo and behold, the disc that Harrison had operated on had collapsed and has now formed extreme arthritis. I AM IN PAIN LIKE TO OTHER CONSTANTLY BECAUSE OF RICHARD HARRISON.I do not blame Harrison for my inability to have insurance; in this I am merely a victim of circumstance. But even so, I find that I must tell people about the horrible doctor Harrison is for one core reason that I saw him do twice: he is far too concerned with COVERING HIS OWN ASS. Let me explain:For 1, I think (and did think at the time) that Harrison knew what was wrong with me after my follow up with him, but did not tell me, as this would cause a problem for him. (I have judged this based on his mannerisms and actions at the time, in addition to the over all careless sense he portrayed during the appointment) The other reason is that he LIED to me about the artificial disc surgery and when it was approved by the FDA. The FDA approved the use of artificial discs as an alternative to spinal fusions in OCTOBER of 2006. My surgery was in JUNE of 2007. Harrison told me that the FDA had not yet approved this surgery. He lied to me because he did not want to risk doing the operation in me, as I was (then) 17, and if something went wrong, this would also look bad on him. I feel that the world should know how horrible of a "doctor" Harrison is. Actually, this man is no more a doctor than he is a potato chip. I would not recommend this self-center liar to my enemies, let alone anyone who wants to potentially let this man operate on them.Sincerely,

Mark as Helpful  | 3 people found this helpful Report Abuse