Dermatologist/Mohs Surgeon
12 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
610 Farm Ln
Doylestown, PA 18901
215-345-6647
Locations and availability (1)

Education ?

Medical School Score
Thomas Jefferson University (1998)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples
Residency
Walter Reed Army Medical Center (2003) *
Dermatology
Fellowship
Brown University (2007) *
MOHS-Micrographic Surgery
* This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Dermatology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Willard is affiliated with 2 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Doylestown Hospital
    595 W State St, Doylestown, PA 18901
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Abington Memorial Hospital *
    1200 Old York Rd, Abington, PA 19001
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Willard has contributed to 8 publications.
    Title Repair of Lateral Sidewall and Partial Alar Defects: Nasalis Island Pedicle Flap with Partial Second-intention Healing.
    Date February 2011
    Journal Dermatologic Surgery : Official Publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et Al.]
    Title Leukemia Cutis (involving Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia) Within Excisional Specimens: a Series of 6 Cases.
    Date July 2009
    Journal The American Journal of Dermatopathology
    Excerpt

    We present 6 cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that incidentally involved 6 excisional specimens for biopsy-proven carcinoma. CLL was notably absent from all 5 biopsies that were available for review. In 2 of 6 cases, this was the patients' initial presentation of CLL. Five of 6 cases involved routine paraffin-embedded tissue specimens and 1 case involved frozen tissue sections from a Mohs surgical procedure. The mean age range of the patients was 84 years. Only one of 5 patients in which we have follow-up data, died of a CLL-related cause at the time of this submission (mean follow-up 19.8 months). On histologic examination, the most common pattern of involvement by CLL (as seen in 4 of the 6 cases) was a dense, nodular, and superficial and deep perivascular, periadnexal, and perineural infiltrate beneath the fibrosing granulation tissue of the prior biopsy site. The infiltrate involved the upper and deep reticular dermis and subcutaneous fat. The remaining 2 cases demonstrated a novel finding of a subtle infiltration of leukemic cells among extravasated red blood cells within the mid and deep reticular dermis. In all cases, leukemic cells were present as tightly packed, small, monomorphous, hyperchromatic lymphocytes and 1 case demonstrated a proliferation center. Immunohistochemical stains were performed on 3 of 6 cases, and the leukemic cells were CD5/CD20/CD23/CD3. This case series raises awareness that CLL can incidentally involve dermatopathology specimens and occasionally be the initial presentation of the patients' systemic illness. This series also highlights the unique histologic patterns of CLL in the skin, one of which has not been previously described, and illustrates how these patterns are distinct from the typical interstitial infiltration seen in other cases of leukemia cutis.

    Title Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Soldiers from Fort Campbell, Kentucky Returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom Highlights Diagnostic and Therapeutic Options.
    Date May 2006
    Journal Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), rare in the first Gulf War, is common in American troops serving in Operation Iraqi Freedom. Awareness of the clinical features and treatment options of CL would benefit clinicians who may encounter soldiers, as well as civilians, returning from the Middle East with skin lesions. OBJECTIVE: Our purpose was to describe our clinical experience in treating soldiers with CL. METHODS: From December 2003 through June 2004, approximately 360 of an estimated 20,000 soldiers returning from a yearlong deployment in Iraq with skin lesions suspected of being CL were examined by dermatologists. We summarized CL diagnoses, laboratory evaluations, and treatments, including localized heat therapy (ThermoMed model 1.8; ThermoSurgery Technologies, Inc, Phoenix, Ariz), oral fluconazole, cryotherapy, and itraconazole. RESULTS: Among 237 soldiers diagnosed with CL, 181 had one or more laboratory confirmations, most by Giemsa-stained lesion smears and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR was positive for all 122 smear-positive and 26 biopsy-positive lesions and all 34 smear negative and all 3 biopsy-negative cases. Primary outpatient treatments, including ThermoMed (n = 26), oral fluconazole (n = 15), cryotherapy (n = 4), and itraconazole (n = 2), were safe and tolerable. Treatment failure occurred in 2 fluconazole recipients and was suspected in 1 ThermoMed and 2 fluconazole recipients. Seventy-two soldiers elected no treatment. LIMITATION: This was a retrospective study. CONCLUSION: Approximately 1% of Ft Campbell troops returning from Iraq were diagnosed with CL, most by laboratory confirmation. PCR appeared to be the most useful diagnostic technique. Among outpatient treatments, ThermoMed and cryotherapy had favorable safety and efficacy profiles.

    Title A Novel Digital Tourniquet Using a Sterile Glove and Hemostat.
    Date October 2004
    Journal Dermatologic Surgery : Official Publication for American Society for Dermatologic Surgery [et Al.]
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: Surgery of the digit is facilitated with adequate hemostasis for visualization of the operative field. Several types of tourniquets have been used for this purpose, including glove fingers, Penrose drains, Marmed digital tourniquets, and standard pneumatic tourniquets. OBJECTIVE: To present a novel method to achieve hemostasis during surgery of the digit. MATERIALS: A slightly oversized sterile glove, a hemostat, and a pair of scissors. CONCLUSION: We present a novel method to achieve hemostasis using a sterile glove and a hemostat, that allows the surgeon to methodically titrate the amount of compression necessary to attain a bloodless field while minimizing the risks of excessive pressures. Surgery of the digit is facilitated with adequate hemostasis for visualization of the operative field. Several types of tourniquets have been used for this purpose, including glove fingers, Penrose drains, Marmed digital tourniquets, and standard pneumatic tourniquets. We present a novel method to achieve hemostasis using a sterile glove and a hemostat that allows the surgeon to methodically titrate the amount of compression necessary to attain a bloodless field while minimizing the risks of excessive pressures.

    Title Flesh-colored Papules on the Wrists of a 61-year-old Man.
    Date February 2004
    Journal Archives of Dermatology
    Title Pathologic Quiz Case: a 23-year-old Man with a Solitary Red Calf Lesion.
    Date June 2003
    Journal Archives of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
    Title Chronic Palmar Ulcer: a Case of Epithelioid Sarcoma.
    Date April 2003
    Journal International Journal of Dermatology
    Title Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Chronic Neutrophilic Leukemia.
    Date March 2001
    Journal Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology
    Excerpt

    Chronic neutrophilic leukemia (CNL) is a rare myeloproliferative disorder. Less than 50 cases have been reported. We report the first case of CNL with an associated leukemia cutis. CNL was diagnosed in a 74-year-old white woman in 1998, based on neutrophilic infiltration of the bone marrow and absence of the Philadelphia chromosome. The patient presented to the dermatology service in August 1998 with a 2-week history of a pruritic eruption on the arms, hands, and legs. Physical examination revealed red to violaceous plaques on both thighs and knees, in addition to purpuric patches and plaques on the dorsal hands, arms, and legs. Leukemia cutis was demonstrated on biopsy specimens of several lesional sites. The eruption progressed, despite treatment with topical and systemic corticosteroids. Treatment with systemic chemotherapy did affect partial resolution of the eruption, with parallel decreases in bone pain and white blood cell count, but the disease progressed and the patient ultimately died 5 months after her initial skin findings. Only one other case of CNL with dermatologic manifestations has been reported, CNL associated with a reactional neutrophilic dermatosis. Comparison to and differentiation from this case is discussed. The importance of distinguishing the specific infiltrates of leukemia from the nonspecific infiltrates of reactional dermatoses, such as Sweet's syndrome, is illustrated.


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