Otolaryngologist (ear, nose, throat)
7 years of experience

Dearborn
18101 Oakwood Blvd
Dearborn, MI 48124
313-253-0800
Locations and availability (6)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
University of California at Irvine (2003)
  • Currently 3 of 4 apples
Top 50%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Board of Otolaryngology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Hong is affiliated with 9 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Beaumont Hospital, Grosse Pointe
    Otolaryngology
    468 Cadieux Rd, Grosse Pointe, MI 48230
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • St John Detroit Riverview Hospital
    7733 E Jefferson Ave, Detroit, MI 48214
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Detroit Receiving Hospital & University Health Center
    Otolaryngology
    4201 Saint Antoine St, Detroit, MI 48201
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak
  • Providence Park Hospital
    47601 Grand River Ave, Novi, MI 48374
  • Hutzel Women's Hospital
  • Royal Oak (1 Year
  • Oakwood Hospital and Medical Center
  • Providence Hospital and Medical Center
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Hong has contributed to 7 publications.
    Title Sequential Stream Segregation Using Temporal Periodicity Cues in Cochlear Implant Recipients.
    Date September 2009
    Journal The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Excerpt

    Sequential stream segregation involves the ability of a listener to perceptually segregate two rapidly alternating sounds into different perceptual streams. By studying auditory streaming in cochlear implants (CIs), one can obtain a better understanding of the cues that CI recipients can use to segregate different sound sources, which may have relevance to such everyday activities as the understanding of speech in background noise. This study focuses on the ability of CI users to use temporal periodicity cues to perform auditory stream segregation. A rhythmic discrimination task involving sequences of alternating amplitude-modulated (AM) noises is used. The results suggest that most CI users can stream AM noise bursts at relatively low modulation frequencies (near 80 Hz AM), but that this ability diminishes at higher modulation frequencies. Additionally, the ability of CI users to perform streaming using temporal periodicity cues appears to be comparable to that of normal-hearing listeners. These results imply that CI subjects may in certain contexts (i.e., when the talker has a low fundamental frequency voice) be able to use temporal periodicity cues to segregate and thus understand the voices of competing talkers.

    Title Neurolymphomatosis Mimicking Chemotherapy-induced Ototoxicity.
    Date September 2009
    Journal Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
    Excerpt

    To present an unusual cause of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss mimicking chemotherapy-induced ototoxicity.

    Title Pure-tone Auditory Stream Segregation and Speech Perception in Noise in Cochlear Implant Recipients.
    Date January 2008
    Journal The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Excerpt

    This study examined the ability of cochlear implant users and normal-hearing subjects to perform auditory stream segregation of pure tones. An adaptive, rhythmic discrimination task was used to assess stream segregation as a function of frequency separation of the tones. The results for normal-hearing subjects were consistent with previously published observations (L.P.A.S van Noorden, Ph.D. dissertation, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven, The Netherlands 1975), suggesting that auditory stream segregation increases with increasing frequency separation. For cochlear implant users, there appeared to be a range of pure-tone streaming abilities, with some subjects demonstrating streaming comparable to that of normal-hearing individuals, and others possessing much poorer streaming abilities. The variability in pure-tone streaming of cochlear implant users was correlated with speech perception in both steady-state noise and multi-talker babble. Moderate, statistically significant correlations between streaming and both measures of speech perception in noise were observed, with better stream segregation associated with better understanding of speech in noise. These results suggest that auditory stream segregation is a contributing factor in the ability to understand speech in background noise. The inability of some cochlear implant users to perform stream segregation may therefore contribute to their difficulties in noise backgrounds.

    Title Conditioning Pulse Trains in Cochlear Implants: Effects on Loudness Growth.
    Date August 2006
    Journal Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
    Excerpt

    HYPOTHESIS: The addition of a high-rate (5 kpps) conditioning pulse train to the input signal of cochlear implants will result in shallower loudness growth across the dynamic range of cochlear implant patients. BACKGROUND: High-rate conditioning pulse trains have been shown to increase the dynamic range of sinusoidal stimuli for cochlear implant recipients in a manner consistent with stochastic resonance. This study further characterizes the effects of conditioning stimuli on loudness by examining the loudness growth functions for sinusoidal stimuli both with and without conditioning. METHODS: Seven post-lingually deafened adults using the Clarion CII cochlear implant participated in this study. The loudness growth functions of each subject were characterized using sinusoidal stimuli, both with and without the presence of a high-rate conditioner. Loudness was measured using magnitude estimation. RESULTS: The loudness growth functions of all seven subjects demonstrate an increase in dynamic range for sinusoidal stimuli with the addition of the conditioning pulse train. Shallower loudness growth is seen across the dynamic range with the addition of a conditioner. This result was shown for loudness growth fitted to exponential, power, and cumulative gaussian functions. CONCLUSION: The addition of high-rate conditioning pulse trains to sinusoidal stimuli presented to cochlear implant recipients results in larger dynamic ranges, with more gradual increases in loudness growth across the dynamic range. This suggests that signal-processing strategies incorporating conditioning may be clinically useful, requiring less compression of the input signal and leading to less distortion perceived by cochlear implant patients.

    Title High-rate Conditioning Pulse Trains in Cochlear Implants: Dynamic Range Measures with Sinusoidal Stimuli.
    Date February 2004
    Journal The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
    Excerpt

    The addition of a continuous, unmodulated, high-rate pulse train to the electrical signals of cochlear implant recipients results in statistically significant increases in psychophysical dynamic range (41 out of 46 electrode pairs tested). The observed increases in dynamic range are thought to result from nerve conditioning by appropriate levels of high-rate pulse train. Five dynamic range profiles are characterized, defining the different responses of dynamic range observed with increasing levels of the conditioner. Four of the five profiles demonstrate increases in dynamic range, with three showing behavior consistent with stochastic resonance. One profile depicts evidence of adaptation in response to higher levels of the conditioner, with a recovery period lasting throughout the duration (on the scale of tens of minutes) of experimentation. Dynamic range profiles are shown to be similar across sinusoidal frequencies (202, 515, and 1031 Hz) but potentially different across electrode pairs (electrodes 1-2, 7-8, and 15-16). Correlation analysis does not reveal any predictors of optimal conditioner level or amount of dynamic range increase with the conditioner.

    Title Dynamic Range Enhancement for Cochlear Implants.
    Date September 2003
    Journal Otology & Neurotology : Official Publication of the American Otological Society, American Neurotology Society [and] European Academy of Otology and Neurotology
    Excerpt

    HYPOTHESIS: The addition of a continuous, unmodulated, high-rate pulse train to sinusoidal stimuli presented by the cochlear implant to implant recipients will result in increases in the psychophysical dynamic range. BACKGROUND: The hearing dynamic range of cochlear implant patients is markedly reduced compared with that of normal-hearing individuals. This has negative implications for both speech perception and sound quality in these patients. It has been suggested that the addition of an unmodulated high-rate pulse train to deafened auditory nerves could create spontaneous-like neural activity, similar to that recorded from normal ears, of which one significant benefit would be an increase in the dynamic range of cochlear implant users. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients who underwent implantation with the Clarion CII device participated in this single-blinded prospective study. The psychophysical dynamic range of 28 of these subjects was measured with sinusoidal stimuli in response to various levels of an additional unmodulated high-rate pulse train. RESULTS: All the tested subjects (n = 28) demonstrated an increase in dynamic range in response to an appropriate level of unmodulated high-rate pulse train. The largest increase in dynamic range for each subject had a mean value of 6.7 dB. CONCLUSION: The addition of an unmodulated high-rate pulse train to the electric signal presented to cochlear implant patients results in significant increases in dynamic range for sinusoidal stimuli.

    Title Determination and Validation of Tetrodotoxin in Human Whole Blood Using Hydrophilic Interaction Liquid Chromatography-tandem Mass Spectroscopy and Its Application.
    Date
    Journal Forensic Science International
    Excerpt

    A sensitive analytical method was developed for the quantitative determination of tetrodotoxin (TTX), a powerful sodium channel blocker, in human postmortem whole blood. The sample mixture was cleaned up using cation exchange SPE catridge after protein precipitation by methanol and then separated on a PC-HILIC (phosphorylcholine hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography) column (150 mm × 2.0mm i.d., 5 μm) using a isocratic elution of 1% acetic acid and acetonitrile. The identification of TTX was performed on tandem mass spectrometry with electrospray ionization interface in positive ion mode. The retention time of voglibose (internal standard) and TTX was 5.1 and 6.0 min, respectively. TTX and internal standard (voglibose) were monitored and quantitated using the ion transitions: the respective precursor to product ion combinations, m/z 320/302 for TTX and m/z 268/92 for voglibose in the multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) mode. The recovery of TTX and voglibose was 61.4% and 62.8%, respectively and the good accuracy (97.7-103.9%), linearity (2-1200 ng/mL) and reproducibility were shown in this method. The limit of detection and limit of quantification were 0.32 ng/mL and 1.08 ng/mL, respectively. This method was applied in the case of three fishermen who were poisoned (including one death) by unknown fish on their boat in October 2010. In this case, the levels of TTX were 27.2, 30.0 and 29.7 ng/mL in heart blood, peripheral blood and serum of a victim, were 3.1 and 12.1 ng/mL in peripheral blood and 3.9 and 12.8 ng/mL in serum of two survivors, respectively.

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