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Urologist
10 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients

Education ?

Medical School Score
Drexel University (2000)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice Award (2011, 2013 - 2014)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2011, 2013)
Associations
American Board of Urology
American Urological Association

Affiliations ?

Dr. Lombardo is affiliated with 15 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Hackensack University Medical Center
    Urology
    30 Prospect Ave, Hackensack, NJ 07601
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Monmouth Medical Center
    300 2nd Ave, Long Branch, NJ 07740
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Pascack Valley Hospital
    250 Old Hook Rd, Westwood, NJ 07675
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Clara Maass Medical Center
    1 Clara Maass Dr, Belleville, NJ 07109
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Columbus Hospital
    495 N 13th St, Newark, NJ 07107
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Mountainside Hospital
    1 Bay Ave, Montclair, NJ 07042
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Hackettstown Regional Medical Center
    651 Willow Grove St, Hackettstown, NJ 07840
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • St. James Hospital Cathedral
    155 Jefferson St, Newark, NJ 07105
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Cathedral Healthcare System
    268 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Cathedral Healthcare System-St Michael's
    111 Central Ave, Newark, NJ 07102
  • Saint Michael's Medical Center
    268 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102
  • St Barnabas Hospital
  • Cathedral Health Care System - St. James Hospital
  • St Michaels Medical Center
  • St James Hospital
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Lombardo has contributed to 7 publications.
    Title Synaptic Plasticity Modulates the Spontaneous Recovery of Locomotion After Spinal Cord Hemisection.
    Date March 2007
    Journal Neuroscience Research
    Excerpt

    Several evidences have demonstrated that adult mammals could achieve a wide range of spontaneous sensory-motor recovery after spinal cord injury by means of various forms of neuroplasticity. In this study we evaluated the possibility that after low-thoracic spinal cord hemisection in the adult rat, significant hindlimb locomotor recovery could occur, and that this recovery may be driven, at least in part, by mechanisms of synaptic plasticity. In order to address these issues, we measured the expression levels of synapsin-I and brain-derived neurotrophic factor by Western blotting, at various time points after hemisection and correlated them with the motor performance on a grid walk test. Regression analysis showed that the expression of synapsin-I was strongly correlated with the spontaneous recovery of hindlimb locomotion (R=0.78). Conversely, neither the expression levels of synapsin-I nor the locomotor recovery were associated with the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. Overall results indicate that after spinal cord hemisection, substantial recovery of hindlimb locomotion could occur spontaneously, and that synaptic plasticity within spinal circuitries below the level of the lesion, could be an important mechanism involved in these processes.

    Title Impact of Laparoscopic Donor Nephrectomy on Allograft Function in Pediatric Renal Transplant Recipients: a Single-center Report.
    Date January 2007
    Journal Pediatric Transplantation
    Excerpt

    Laparoscopic donor nephrectomy (LDN) is rapidly becoming the preferred technique for the procurement of living donor kidneys. An association of this technique with delayed graft function and higher risk for rejection has been reported in pediatric recipients. We reviewed our experience of 17 pediatric patients who received a living donor kidney, from 2002 to 2004, procured by LDN, and compared it with a matched group that received living donor kidneys harvested by the open technique. Patient demographics, etiology of renal failure, intra-operative events, length of stay, serum creatinine decline, and graft function were reviewed. Our experience confirmed the findings of earlier reports specifically in small pediatric recipients. The LDN group showed a significantly slower decline in creatinine in the immediate post-operative period and longer intra-operative time. However, there was no difference between the two groups in the length of hospital stay, and creatinine clearances at discharge, six, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. The incidence of acute rejection was similar in both groups. LDN is a safe procurement modality for pediatric patients. The risk for prolonged OR time and delay graft function has to be considered during the evaluation process.

    Title Maternal Exposure to the Antiepileptic Drug Vigabatrin Affects Postnatal Development in the Rat.
    Date August 2005
    Journal Neurological Sciences : Official Journal of the Italian Neurological Society and of the Italian Society of Clinical Neurophysiology
    Excerpt

    The objective was to investigate, in the rat, the effects of maternal exposure to vigabatrin (VGB) on the postnatal motor-cognitive behaviour of the offspring. We used an experimental evaluator-blind, placebo-controlled study in the rat. Ten pregnant rats were divided into five groups and treated with different doses of VGB (250, 500, 750, 1000 mg/kg/day) or placebo from gestation day (GD) 6 to GD10. After delivery, 56 pups (40 pups prenatally exposed to VGB and 16 pups exposed to placebo) were evaluated for motor-cognitive behaviour throughout postpartum day 40. At the end of testing sessions the animals were sacrificed and brain tissues processed for biochemical analysis of GABA levels. Body weight of pups and young rats whose mothers were treated with a dose of 750 mg/kg/day were significantly lower both at birth and during the whole postnatal life with respect to the control groups. Young rats of this group exhibited impaired performance in both the open-field and water maze tasks. Brain GABA contents were dramatically increased in this group of rats. No other significant nutritional, biochemical or behavioural changes were observed after treatments with doses of VGB lower than 750 mg/kg/day. The exposure to a dose of 1000 mg/kg caused abortion. Maternal exposure to VGB at relatively high doses (750 mg/kg/day) is likely to cause some important changes of the nutritional status during the pre- and postnatal life. Thus, the biochemical and cognitive abnormalities observed in this study could be related to some disturbances of brain development induced by malnutrition and/or to a disturbance of neuronal programming of the gabaergic system.

    Title Levels of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neurotrophin-4 in Lumbar Motoneurons After Low-thoracic Spinal Cord Hemisection.
    Date August 2004
    Journal Brain Research
    Excerpt

    Neuroplasticity represents a common phenomenon after spinal cord (SC) injury or deafferentation that compensates for the loss of modulatory inputs to the cord. Neurotrophins play a crucial role in cell survival and anatomical reorganization of damaged spinal cord, and are known to exert an activity-dependent modulation of neuroplasticity. Little is known about their role in the earliest plastic events, probably involving synaptic plasticity, which are responsible for the rapid recovery of hindlimb motility after hemisection, in the rat. In order to gain further insight, we evaluated the changes in BDNF and NT-4 expression by lumbar motoneurons after low-thoracic spinal cord hemisection. Early after lesion (30 min), the immunostaining density within lumbar motoneurons decreased markedly on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides of the spinal cord. This reduction was statistically significant and was then followed by a significant recovery along the experimental period (14 days), during which a substantial recovery of hindlimb motility was observed. Our data indicate that BDNF and NT-4 expression could be modulated by activity of spinal circuitry and further support putative involvement of the endogenous neurotrophins in mechanisms of spinal neuroplasticity.

    Title Anisotropic Representation of Forelimb Position in the Cerebellar Cortex and Nucleus Interpositus of the Rat.
    Date July 2003
    Journal Brain Research
    Excerpt

    The relationship between the spatial location of limb and the activity of cerebellar neurons has received little attention and its nature still remains ambiguous. To address this question we studied the activity of Purkinje and nucleus interpositus cells in relation to the spatial location of rat forelimb. A computer-controlled robot arm displaced the limb passively across 15 positions distributed on a parasagittal plane. The limb was upheld for 8 s in each position, which was identified by the Cartesian coordinates of the forepaw. We selected the neurons whose activities were significantly modulated by forepaw position and found that the majority represented preferentially one spatial dimension of the Cartesian plane both in the cerebellar cortex and nucleus interpositus. In particular, the antero-posterior axis was best represented in cerebellar neuronal discharges. This result suggests that the intermediate part of the cerebellum might encode limb position by way of an anisotropic representation of the spatial coordinates of the limb end-point.

    Title Kinematic Features of Passive Forelimb Movements and Rat Cuneate Neuron Discharges.
    Date May 2002
    Journal Neuroreport
    Excerpt

    We examined the role of main and external cuneate nuclei neurons in processing sensory information during forelimb passive movement. We recorded activity of neurons using circular and figure-eight trajectories, at different speeds, in anaesthetized rats. A multivariate regression analysis was performed to correlate neural discharge to movement direction and speed, the two components of the velocity vector. We found that the activity of the majority of cuneate neurons related to passive movement velocity and that the directional component of the velocity vector accounted for a larger fraction of the variability in the firing rate than the scalar component (speed). These results indicate that cuneate cells can process whole limb afferent information to elaborate a representation of the movement velocity vector.

    Title Cryoablation of Small Renal Tumors in Patients with Solitary Kidneys: Initial Experience.
    Date
    Journal Advances in Urology
    Excerpt

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of renal cryoablation in patients with solitary kidneys with the goals of tumor destruction and maximal renal parenchymal preservation. Methods. Eleven patients with single tumors were treated with cryoablation, of which 10 patients had solitary kidneys and 1 had a nonfunctioning contralateral kidney. All procedures were performed via an open extraperitoneal approach; ten tumors were treated with in-situ cryoablation and 1 tumor was treated with cryo-assisted partial nephrectomy. Results. Cryoablation was successfully performed without any preoperative complications. Mean patient age was 62.4 years (range 49-79), tumor location included: 6 (upper pole), 2 (mid-kidney), 3 (lower pole). The mean and median tumor size was 2.6 cm and 2.8 cm (range 1.2-4.3 cm), mean operative time 205 minutes (range 180-270 minutes), blood loss 98.5 ml (range 40-250 ml), and hospitalization 4.6 days (range 3-8 days). Creatinine values included: preoperative 1.43 mg/dL (range 1.2-1.9), postoperative 1.67 mg/dL (range 1.5-2.5), and nadir 1.57 mg/dL (range 1.3-2.1). All patients were followed postoperatively with magnetic resonance imaging for surveillance. At a median follow-up of 43 months, 9 patients had no evidence of recurrence, 1 patient has an enhancing indeterminate area, and 1 patient was lost to follow-up. Conclusion. Intermediate-term results suggest that renal cryoablation offers a feasible alternative for patients that require a maximal nephron-sparing effort with preservation of renal function and minimal risk of tumor recurrence.

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