Urologists
9 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Palmetto Greenville Urology
52 Bear Dr
Greenville, SC 29605
864-295-2131
Locations and availability (3)

Education ?

Medical School Score
University of Missouri at Kansas City (2001)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Urological Association
American Board of Urology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Sterrett is affiliated with 4 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • St. Francis Hospital Downtown
    Urology
    1 Saint Francis Dr, Greenville, SC 29601
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Greenville Memorial Hospital
    Urology
    701 Grove Rd, Greenville, SC 29605
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • St. Francis Eastside
    125 Commonwealth Dr, Greenville, SC 29615
  • Palmetto Baptist
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Sterrett has contributed to 10 publications.
    Title Emergency Room Follow-up Trends in Urolithiasis: Single-center Report.
    Date June 2009
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    Over 1 million emergency room visits are made annually for renal colic and urinary stone disease in the United States. This study seeks to determine patterns of follow-up for patients diagnosed with ureterolithiasis in a single emergency department.

    Title Acetazolamide is an Effective Adjunct for Urinary Alkalization in Patients with Uric Acid and Cystine Stone Formation Recalcitrant to Potassium Citrate.
    Date September 2008
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: Acetazolamide has been proposed as a treatment adjunct for patients with cystine and uric acid stone formation recalcitrant to standard alkalization therapy. We evaluated the effect of acetazolamide in urinary alkalization in patients with uric acid and cystine stone formation recalcitrant to potassium citrate alone. METHODS: An institutional review board-approved, retrospective chart review identified 12 patients at 2 sites who had been prescribed acetazolamide as a treatment adjunct to potassium citrate for uric acid or cystine stones from 1997 to 2007. We evaluated the urine studies, metabolic evaluations, surgical interventions, and stone recurrence or growth. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 46.1 months (range 11-86). Ten patients (83%) were categorized as compliant. Of the 2 patients excluded from the study, 1 was noncompliant with the medication, and the other was lost to follow-up. Of the 10 patients who were compliant with the treatment, 5 (50%) developed adverse effects from the medication requiring discontinuation. Of the remaining 5 patients (50%) who tolerated the medication and remained compliant, 3 (60%) were stone free at a mean follow-up of 42 months. Two patients continued to form stones, including one who developed calcification of an existing uric acid stone. Both patients required surgical intervention. The mean urinary pH before treatment was 5.9 (range 5-7) and after treatment was 7.2 (range 6.5-8.5; P = .001). CONCLUSIONS: Acetazolamide was effective in increasing the urinary pH in patients with uric acid and cystine stone formation who were already taking potassium citrate. Caution must be taken when prescribing acetazolamide, because it could be poorly tolerated and can induce calcium phosphate stone formation.

    Title Hand-assisted Radical Laparoscopic Nephrectomy.
    Date September 2008
    Journal Bju International
    Title Robotic Assisted Laparoscopic Radical Prostatectomy: Evolution and Outcomes.
    Date July 2008
    Journal Minerva Urologica E Nefrologica = The Italian Journal of Urology and Nephrology
    Excerpt

    Robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy (RALP) is rapidly gaining acceptance in the urologic community as an effective treatment modality for the treatment of localized prostate cancer. For the open surgeon, this technology assists in the transition to laparoscopic-based surgery. With early stage cancer, the absence of tactile feedback appears to be offset by the superior visualization and instrumentation that the daVinci robot (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) provides. Economical considerations also appear to be outweighed by patient demand and benefits. Short-term perioperative, functional, and oncological outcomes all appear to be equivalent to the gold standard, open radical retropubic prostatectomy. In conclusion, RALP is an excellent option for patients considering prostate cancer treatment and should be part of the urologic surgeon's armamentarium.

    Title Medical Expulsive Therapy.
    Date July 2008
    Journal Seminars in Nephrology
    Excerpt

    Minimally invasive therapies for urolithiasis including extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, ureteroscopy, and percutaneous nephrostolithotomy are highly efficacious, yet expensive. Medical expulsive therapy offers a cost-effective, nonsurgical approach for appropriate patients with ureteral stones. The use of hormones, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, calcium channel blockers, corticosteroids, and adrenergic alpha antagonists all have been proposed as a way to enhance stone passage. In view of the available clinical trials and meta-analysis, patients with distal ureteral stones measuring 1 cm who are candidates for observation deserve a trial of medical expulsive therapy. Nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker, and adrenergic alpha antagonists have been proven to be clinically efficacious, safe, and well tolerated as medical expulsive agents.

    Title Medical Expulsive Therapy.
    Date June 2008
    Journal Current Opinion in Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Researchers have recently sought out pharmacologic means of increasing rates of urinary stone passage. We outline the current understanding in medical expulsive therapy. RECENT FINDINGS: We review available articles characterizing pharmaceutical agents including alpha receptor antagonists as medical expulsive agents. SUMMARY: Medical expulsive therapy for ureteral stones provides a nonsurgical option for patients with ureteral stones. In view of the available clinical trials and meta-analysis, patients with distal ureteral stones measuring less than 1 cm who are candidates for observation warrant a trial of medical expulsive therapy.

    Title Clinical Significance of Benign Glands at Surgical Margins in Robotic Radical Prostatectomy Specimens.
    Date August 2007
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: Completion of robotic radical prostatectomy compared with conventional open retropubic radical prostatectomy can result in different alterations in the prostatectomy specimens. One difference appears to be an increased incidence of benign glands at the margins, which has been associated with an increase in postoperative prostatic-specific antigen (PSA) levels. We compared the frequency and clinical significance of benign prostate glands at the surgical margins in radical prostatectomy specimens obtained by robotic versus open retropubic prostatectomy. METHODS: We reviewed 38 consecutive prostatectomy specimens from patients with biopsy-proven prostate cancer. Of these 38 specimens, 25 (65%) were obtained by robotic resection and 13 (35%) by open retropubic prostatectomy. Each case was analyzed for Gleason score, pathologic stage, including margin status, and the presence or absence of benign glands at the surgical margin. The study endpoint was the postoperative serum PSA level. RESULTS: A significantly greater incidence (P = 0.035) of benign glands at the surgical margins was found within the robotic group compared with the open retropubic prostatectomy group (54% versus 15%). With a median follow-up of 12.5 months for the robotic group and 24.5 months for the robotic prostatectomy group, only 2 patients, who also had had positive surgical margins, had a continued and persistent increase in the postoperative PSA level after an initial nadir. CONCLUSIONS: The early clinical follow-up data of our study have suggested that patients undergoing robotic radical prostatectomy with negative surgical margins achieve a PSA nadir of less than 0.1 ng/mL, irrespective of the presence or absence of benign prostatic tissue at the surgical margins.

    Title Metallothioneins and Resistance to Cisplatin and Radiation in Prostate Cancer.
    Date July 2006
    Journal Urology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVES: The metallothioneins (MTs) are a family of small molecular weight trace metal and free radical scavenging proteins well established to play a role in the resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in human cancers. MT gene expression is upregulated in response to the presence of metal ions such as zinc. Because prostatic tissue has the greatest concentration of zinc in the human body, in this study we analyzed the effect of MT induction by zinc in prostate cancer (PCa). METHODS: The activation of MT gene expression in response to zinc treatment in LNCaP and C4-2 PCa cells was shown by Western blotting and DNA microarray analysis. Chemotherapy and radiation sensitivity assays of cells after treatment with cisplatin or radiation were performed in the presence, or absence, of 150 microM ZnSO4, and cell viability was measured after 72 hours by MTS viability and clonogenic and flow cytometry assays. The experiments were repeated three times and the data analyzed. RESULTS: Increasing concentrations of ZnSO4 upregulated MT expression in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis demonstrated a specific increase in MT expression. Cells treated with zinc demonstrated a significantly decreased sensitivity to cisplatin and radiotherapy compared with controls (P <0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Our data have confirmed that treatment of PCa with zinc causes an increase in MT expression, which is significantly associated with resistance to cisplatin chemotherapy and radiotherapy in PCa. Therapeutic targeting of MT may therefore provide a means to overcome resistance to radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy in PCa.

    Title Salvage of Renal Allograft Using Venous Thrombectomy in the Setting of Iliofemoral Venous Thrombosis.
    Date September 2004
    Journal Nephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation : Official Publication of the European Dialysis and Transplant Association - European Renal Association
    Title Renal Thermal Ablative Therapy.
    Date
    Journal The Urologic Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Energy targeting is greatly enhanced through imaging modalities, which greatly assist needle placement or energy delivery to the optimal location for maximal effectiveness. When vital structures obscure access to the renal lesion, laparoscopic mobilization of these structures with direct visualization of the tumor can increase the likelihood of ablation success and minimize complication risk. Ablative therapies are attractive because of their minimal impact on patient quality of life in addition to their morbidity and cost. Although they show promise of efficacy, they must be evaluated with long-term follow-up before they are considered the standard of oncologic care. Renal masses can be treated with a laparoscopic or percutaneous approach depending on tumor location, size, and the available technology and experience of the center.


    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Brant Mayher

    Urology
    15 years experience
    Greenville, SC

    Dr. Charlton Armstrong

    Urology
    40 years experience
    Greenville, SC

    Dr. Michael Mathers

    Urology
    40 years experience
    Greenville, SC

    Dr. James Monroe

    Urology
    24 years experience
    Greenville, SC

    Dr. J Rice

    Urology
    26 years experience
    Greenville, SC

    Dr. Thomas Hamilton

    Urology
    19 years experience
    Greenville, SC
    Search All Similar Doctors