Urogynecologist & Reconstructive pelvic surgeon
8 years of experience

Accepting new patients
East Dallas
3600 Gaston Ave
Ste 558
Dallas, TX 75246
214-820-8700
Locations and availability (3)

Education ?

Medical School Score
The University of Texas Southwestern (2002)
  • Currently 1 of 4 apples
Residency
Parkland Memorial Hospital (2006) *
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Fellowship
The University of Texas Southwestern (2009) *
Gynecology
* This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice Award (2011 - 2013)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2011 - 2013)
Associations
American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Roshanravan is affiliated with 2 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Baylor University Medical Center *
    3500 Gaston Ave, Dallas, TX 75246
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Baylor Regional Medical Center at Plano *
    4700 Alliance Blvd, Plano, TX 75093
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Roshanravan has contributed to 7 publications.
    Title Pathophysiology of Urinary Incontinence, Voiding Dysfunction, and Overactive Bladder.
    Date April 2010
    Journal Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America
    Excerpt

    Urinary incontinence and voiding dysfunction are common forms of pelvic floor dysfunction affecting women. The complex interactions between the nervous system and lower urinary tract anatomy allow for the coordinated functions of urine storage and evacuation. A thorough understanding of these components and their interactions is the foundation for the diagnosis and treatment of pathologic conditions affecting urine storage or evacuation. These components include changes in neurologic or muscular function, alterations in anatomy, and the deleterious effects of many common comorbid conditions on the lower urinary tract.

    Title Anterior Abdominal Wall Nerve and Vessel Anatomy: Clinical Implications for Gynecologic Surgery.
    Date April 2010
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    We sought to describe relationships of clinically relevant nerves and vessels of the anterior abdominal wall.

    Title Does Supracervical Hysterectomy Provide More Support to the Vaginal Apex Than Total Abdominal Hysterectomy?
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to assess whether cervical preservation at the time of hysterectomy may help prevent subsequent apical vaginal vault prolapse. STUDY DESIGN: Supracervical hysterectomies were performed in 12 unembalmed cadavers. Successive hanging weights of 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg were loaded against the cervical stump and distances moved were recorded. The same process was repeated after completion of a total hysterectomy. RESULTS: Average distances pulled with 1, 2, 3, and 4 kg of traction against the cervical stump were 17.8 +/- 1.9, 24.1 +/- 2.5, 29.0 +/- 2.8, and 34.3 +/- 3.5 mm, respectively. After total hysterectomy, these distances were 17.5 +/- 2.5, 23.5 +/- 2.6, 29.3 +/- 3.1, and 34.5 +/- 3.6 mm, respectively. CONCLUSION: In unembalmed cadavers, it appears that total abdominal hysterectomy and supracervical hysterectomy provide equal resistance to forces applied to the vaginal apex.

    Title Posterior Division of the Internal Iliac Artery: Anatomic Variations and Clinical Applications.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to characterize the anatomy of the internal iliac artery (IIA) and its posterior division branches and to correlate these findings to IIA ligation. STUDY DESIGN: Dissections were performed in 54 female cadavers. RESULTS: Average length of IIA was 27.0 (range, 0-52) mm. Posterior division arteries arose from a common trunk in 62.3% (66 of 106) of pelvic halves. In the remaining specimens, branches arose independently from the IIA, with the iliolumbar noted as the first branch in 28.3%, lateral sacral in 5.7%, and superior gluteal in 3.8%. The average width of the first branch was 5.0 (range, 2-12) mm. In all dissections, posterior division branches arose from the dorsal and lateral aspect of IIA. The internal iliac vein was lateral to the artery in 70.6% (12 of 17) of specimens on the left and 93.3% (14 of 15) on the right. CONCLUSION: Ligation of the IIA 5 cm distal from the common iliac bifurcation would spare posterior division branches in the vast majority of cases. Understanding IIA anatomy is essential to minimize intra-operative blood loss and other complications.

    Title Neurovascular Anatomy of the Sacrospinous Ligament Region in Female Cadavers: Implications in Sacrospinous Ligament Fixation.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to further characterize the anatomy of the coccygeus muscle-sacrospinous ligament (C-SSL) complex and to correlate the findings with sacrospinous ligament fixations (SSLF). STUDY DESIGN: Dissections were performed in 21 female cadavers. RESULTS: In all dissections, nerves originating from S3, S4, S5, or a combination passed over the anterior surface of the C-SSL at its midsegment, and either the pudendal or third sacral nerve coursed on the superior border of C-SSL at its midpoint. In 100% of specimens, the internal pudendal artery (IPA) passed behind or just medial to the ischial spine. The average distance of the inferior gluteal artery (IGA) from the ischial spine and the superior border of the C-SSL was 24.2 (range, 15-35) mm and 3.4 (range, 1-5) mm, respectively. CONCLUSION: Nerves to the coccygeus and levator ani coursed over the midportion of the C-SSL where SSLF sutures are placed. The pudendal nerve and IGA were in proximity to the superior border of the C-SSL at its midportion, whereas the IPA passed behind the ischial spine, lateral to the recommended site for suture placement.

    Title Anatomic Relationships of the Distal Third of the Pelvic Ureter, Trigone, and Urethra in Unembalmed Female Cadavers.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to examine the relationship of the ureter to paravaginal defect repair (PVDR) sutures and to evaluate the anatomy of distal ureter, trigone, and urethra relative to the anterior vaginal wall. STUDY DESIGN: Dissections of the retropubic space were performed in 24 unembalmed female cadavers following placement of PVDR sutures. Lengths of the vagina, urethra, and trigone were recorded. RESULTS: The mean distance between apical PVDR sutures and the ureter was 22.8 (range, 5-36) mm. The average lengths of the urethra, trigone, and vagina were 3 cm, 2.8 cm, and 8.4 cm, respectively. The trigone was positioned over the middle third of the anterior vaginal wall in all specimens and the distal ureters traversed the anterolateral vaginal fornices. CONCLUSION: The ureters may be injured during paravaginal defect repairs, anterior colporrhaphies, and other procedures involving dissection in the upper third of the vagina. Cystotomy during vaginal hysterectomies is most likely to occur 2-3 cm above the trigone.

    Title Uterosacral Ligament Suspension Sutures: Anatomic Relationships in Unembalmed Female Cadavers.
    Date December 2007
    Journal American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to characterize anatomic relationships of uterosacral ligament suspension (USLS) sutures. STUDY DESIGN: The relationship of USLS sutures to the ureters, rectal lumen, and sidewall neurovascular structures was examined in 15 unembalmed female cadavers. RESULTS: The mean distance of the proximal sutures to the ureters and rectal lumen was 14 mm (range, 0-33) and 10 mm (range, 0-33), respectively. The mean distance of the distal sutures to the ureters was 14 mm (range, 4-33) and to the rectal lumen 13 mm (range, 3-23). Right sutures were noted at the level of S1 in 37.5%, S2 in 37.5%, and S3 in 25% of specimens. Left sutures were noted at the level of S1 in 50%, S2 in 29.2%, and S3 in 20.8% of cadavers. Of 48 sutures passed, 1 entrapped the S3 nerve. Sutures perforated the pelvic sidewall vessels in 4.1% of specimens. CONCLUSION: USLS sutures can directly injure the ureters, rectum, and neurovascular structures in the pelvic walls.


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