Plastic Surgeons, Surgical Specialist
14 years of experience

Accepting new patients
24 Frank Lloyd Wright Dr
Ann Arbor, MI 48105
734-998-6022
Locations and availability (4)

Education ?

Medical School Score
University of Illinois at Chicago (1996)
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Association for Hand Surgery
American Society for Surgery of the Hand
American Board of Plastic Surgery

Affiliations ?

Dr. Haase is affiliated with 3 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • University of Michigan Hospitals & Health Centers
    1500 E Medical Center Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    2215 Fuller Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48105
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Haase has contributed to 11 publications.
    Title Survey Says? A Primer on Web-based Survey Design and Distribution.
    Date August 2011
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    The Internet has changed the way in which we gather and interpret information. Although books were once the exclusive bearers of data, knowledge is now only a keystroke away. The Internet has also facilitated the synthesis of new knowledge. Specifically, it has become a tool through which medical research is conducted. A review of the literature reveals that in the past year, over 100 medical publications have been based on Web-based survey data alone. Because of emerging Internet technologies, Web-based surveys can now be launched with little computer knowledge. They may also be self-administered, eliminating personnel requirements. Ultimately, an investigator may build, implement, and analyze survey results with speed and efficiency, obviating the need for mass mailings and data processing. All of these qualities have rendered telephone and mail-based surveys virtually obsolete. Despite these capabilities, Web-based survey techniques are not without their limitations, namely, recall and response biases. When used properly, however, Web-based surveys can greatly simplify the research process. This article discusses the implications of Web-based surveys and provides guidelines for their effective design and distribution.

    Title The Cost-effectiveness of Nonsurgical Versus Surgical Treatment for Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: Invited Commentary.
    Date January 2010
    Journal The Journal of Hand Surgery
    Title A Cost-utility Analysis of Amputation Versus Salvage for Gustilo Type Iiib and Iiic Open Tibial Fractures.
    Date January 2010
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    Lower extremity trauma is common. Despite an abundance of literature on severe injuries that can be treated with salvage or amputation, the appropriate management of these injuries remains uncertain. In this situation, a cost-utility analysis is an important tool in providing an evidence-based practice approach to guide treatment decisions.

    Title Discussion. Flexor Tendon Tissue Engineering: Acellularized and Reseeded Tendon Constructs.
    Date June 2009
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Title Association Between Lunate Morphology and Carpal Collapse Patterns in Scaphoid Nonunions.
    Date December 2007
    Journal The Journal of Hand Surgery
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: Type I lunates have a single distal facet for articulation with the capitate; type II lunates have an additional (medial) hamate facet on the distal articular surface. We retrospectively reviewed a series of patients with scaphoid nonunions to determine if there was an association between lunate morphology and the degree of carpal instability observed. Association between lunate morphology and the location of the scaphoid fracture (proximal or waist) was also investigated. METHODS: Radiographs were evaluated for 45 patients with established scaphoid nonunions. Lunate morphology, scaphoid fracture location, and radiolunate angle were determined. RESULTS: Type I lunates were present in 21 patients. Of these, 15 were found to have a dorsal intercalated segment instability pattern (radiolunate angle greater than 15 degrees ). By contrast, only 4 of the patients with type II lunates exhibited this pattern of instability. No significant association was found between lunate morphology and the scaphoid fracture location. CONCLUSIONS: Type II lunate morphology is associated with significantly decreased incidence of dorsal intercalated segment instability (DISI) deformity in cases of established scaphoid nonunion (p = .0002). Lunate morphology, however, was not significantly associated with the location of the scaphoid fracture in these cases (p = .19).

    Title Treatment of Unstable Distal Radial Fractures with the Volar Locking Plating System.
    Date February 2007
    Journal The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery. American Volume
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: The best treatment for an inadequately reduced fracture of the distal part of the radius is not well established. We collected prospective outcomes data for patients undergoing open reduction and internal fixation of an inadequately reduced distal radial fracture with use of the volar locking plating system. METHODS: Over a two-year period, 161 patients underwent open reduction and internal fixation of an inadequately reduced distal radial fracture with use of the volar locking plating system. Patients were enrolled in the present study three months after the fracture on the basis of strict entry criteria and were evaluated three, six, and twelve months after surgery. Outcome measures included radiographic parameters, grip strength, lateral pinch strength, the Jebsen-Taylor test, wrist range of motion, and the Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire. RESULTS: Eighty-seven patients with a distal radial fracture were enrolled. The mean age at the time of enrollment was 48.9 years. Forty percent (thirty-five) of the eighty-seven fractures were classified as AO type A, 9% (eight) were classified as type B, and 51% (forty-four) were classified as type C. Radiographic assessment showed that the plating system maintained anatomic reduction at the follow-up periods. At the time of the twelve-month follow-up, the mean grip strength on the injured side was worse than that on the contralateral side (18 compared with 21 kg; p<0.01), the mean pinch strength on the injured side was not significantly different from that on the contralateral side (8.7 compared with 8.9 kg; p=0.27), and the mean flexion of the wrist on the injured side was 86% of that on the contralateral side. All Michigan Hand Outcomes Questionnaire domains approached normal scores at six months, with small continued improvement to one year. CONCLUSIONS: The volar locking plating system appears to provide effective fixation when used for the treatment of initially inadequately reduced distal radial fractures.

    Title A Meta-analysis of Outcomes of External Fixation Versus Plate Osteosynthesis for Unstable Distal Radius Fractures.
    Date April 2006
    Journal The Journal of Hand Surgery
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: External fixation and open reduction and internal fixation have been the traditional techniques for surgical fixation of unstable distal radius fractures. The existing literature has not identified which is superior, primarily because of the lack of comparative trials. We performed a comprehensive systematic review and meta-analysis of the current literature on external fixation and internal fixation of distal radius fractures to determine the dominant strategy based on available scientific evidence. METHODS: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE for English-language articles published between 1980 and 2004 that satisfied predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The outcomes of internal and external fixation were compared using continuous measures of grip strength, wrist range of motion, and radiographic alignment and categoric measures of pain, physician-rated outcome scales, and complication rates. Outcomes were pooled by random-effects meta-analysis and meta-regression analysis was used to control for patient age, presence of intra-articular fracture, duration of follow-up period, and date of publication. Sensitivity analyses were used to test the stability of the meta-analysis results under different assumptions. RESULTS: Forty-six articles were included in the review with 28 (917 patients) external fixation studies and 18 (603 patients) internal fixation studies. Meta-analysis did not detect clinically or statistically significant differences in pooled grip strength, wrist range of motion, radiographic alignment, pain, and physician-rated outcomes between the 2 treatment arms. There were higher rates of infection, hardware failure, and neuritis with external fixation and higher rates of tendon complications and early hardware removal with internal fixation. Considerable heterogeneity was present in all studies and adversely affected the precision of the meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: The current literature offers no evidence to support the use of internal fixation over external fixation for unstable distal radius fractures. Comparative trials using appropriately sensitive and validated outcome measurements are needed to guide treatment decisions.

    Title Recovery of Muscle Contractile Function Following Nerve Gap Repair with Chemically Acellularized Peripheral Nerve Grafts.
    Date October 2003
    Journal Journal of Reconstructive Microsurgery
    Excerpt

    Acellular nerve grafts have emerged as a possible alternative for reconstruction of short (<2 cm) peripheral nerve gaps. Axonal regeneration has been demonstrated within the nerve constructs. However, very little work has been done to demonstrate both axonal regeneration and recovery of motor function following peripheral nerve gap repair with acellular nerve constructs. The authors hypothesized that chemically acellularized nerve grafts can support axonal regeneration and provide functional reinnervation of rat hindlimb muscles with equivalent efficiency to peripheral nerve autografts. Peroneal nerves were harvested from adult rats and chemically acellularized. Two- and 4-cm peroneal nerve gaps were reconstructed with either a cellular autograft or an acellular isograft. Functional recovery was evaluated with walking-track analyses and measurement of maximum tetanic isometric force (F 0 ) of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) muscle. Walking-track analysis revealed no statistically significant difference in functional recovery in rats undergoing reconstruction of 2-cm nerve gaps with acellular isografts or cellular autografts. Maximum tetanic isometric force measurements revealed a 60 percent force deficit in EDL muscles reinnervated by 2-cm acellular nerve grafts, compared to cellular autografts. Four-centimeter acellular grafts failed to support any significant EDL muscle reinnervation. This study demonstrates that chemically acellularized peripheral nerve supports axonal regeneration and functional reinnervation across 2-cm nerve gaps, and may potentially serve as an appropriate scaffold for reintroducing cellular elements, adhesion molecules, or growth factors for repair of longer nerve gaps.

    Title Anterior Interosseous Nerve Transfer to the Motor Branch of the Ulnar Nerve for High Ulnar Nerve Injuries.
    Date November 2002
    Journal Annals of Plastic Surgery
    Excerpt

    Primary repair of a high ulnar nerve injury results in a uniformly poor outcome as a result of the great distance between the site of injury and the innervated muscles. In this study the authors present two cases of high ulnar nerve injuries in adults. Reconstruction was performed using the distal branch of the anterior interosseous nerve, which was transferred to the distal motor branch of the ulnar nerve. This resulted in timely return of function to the ulnar-innervated intrinsic muscles of the hand, which was documented further by electromyography. For high ulnar nerve injuries, this type of nerve transfer is a much better approach than the traditional primary neurorrhaphy.

    Title Leiomyoma of the Hand.
    Date
    Journal Hand (new York, N.y.)
    Excerpt

    Leiomyoma is most commonly found in the uterus and lower extremities of middle-aged women. Leiomyoma is uncommonly reported in the hand and is extremely uncommon in children. We present three cases of leiomyoma of the hand, including one case in the hand of a 10-year-old boy.

    Title A Decision Analysis of Amputation Versus Reconstruction for Severe Open Tibial Fracture from the Physician and Patient Perspectives.
    Date
    Journal Annals of Plastic Surgery
    Excerpt

    Although reconstruction is often the primary choice of surgeons after an open tibial fracture, there is no evidence to support the long-term effectiveness of flap reconstruction over below-knee amputation. The aim of this study was to perform a decision analysis to evaluate treatment preferences for type IIIB and IIIC tibial fractures. Reconstructive microsurgeons, physical medicine physicians, and patients with lower extremity trauma completed a Web-based standard gamble utility survey to generate quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Physicians assigned quite high utility values, and there was a slight preference for reconstruction over amputation, with a gain of only 0.55 QALY. Patients assigned significantly lower utility values and also favored reconstruction over amputation, but with a larger gain of 5.54 QALYs. The disparate utilities assigned by the physicians and the patients highlight the necessity of realistic discussion of outcomes, regardless of the management methods.


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