Steven D Vath, MD
Plastic Surgeon, Surgeon
14 years of experience

Accepting new patients
Center For Cosmetic Surgery
725 Heritage Rd
Ste 100
Golden, CO 80401
303-278-2600
Locations and availability (3)

Education ?

Medical School Score
UMDNJ Robert Wood Johnson (1995) *
  • Currently 2 of 4 apples
Residency
Georgetown University Hospital (2001) *
Surgery
University Medical Center - Lafayette (2003) *
Plastic Surgery
Fellowship
Cosmetic Surgery Fellowship - Marina Plastic Surgery Associates (2003) *
Plastic Surgery
Research Fellowship - Veterans Affairs Medical Center (1999) *
Surgery
* This information was reported to Vitals by the doctor or doctor's office.

Awards & Distinctions ?

Awards  
Patients' Choice 5th Anniversary Award (2012 - 2013)
Patients' Choice Award (2008 - 2013)
Compassionate Doctor Recognition (2010 - 2013)

Affiliations ?

Dr. Vath is affiliated with 3 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Exempla Lutheran Medical Ctr *
    8300 W 38th Ave, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Lakewood Surgery Center *
  • Saint Anthony North Hospital *
    2551 W 84th Ave, Westminster, CO 80031
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Vath has contributed to 8 publications.
    Title Ten Years of Outpatient Abdominoplasties: Safe and Effective.
    Date December 2009
    Journal Aesthetic Surgery Journal / the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
    Excerpt

    Abdominoplasty has traditionally been described in the literature as an operation that is performed in a hospital setting, although more recently it is likely that most procedures are performed on an outpatient basis. To date, there have been very few large series illustrating the safety and efficacy of abdominoplasty performed in outpatient surgery centers.

    Title Does Lipoplasty Really Add Morbidity to Abdominoplasty? Revisiting the Controversy with a Series of 406 Cases.
    Date June 2009
    Journal Aesthetic Surgery Journal / the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
    Excerpt

    The popularity of plastic surgery "makeover" television programs has increased interest among the public and the medical community in both the positive and negative aspects of combined surgery procedures. In particular, the safety of combining abdominoplasty with lipoplasty became a matter of concern following multiple deaths in Florida and the consequent moratorium on simultaneous abdominoplasty and lipoplasty enacted by the Florida Board of Medicine.

    Title Laser-assisted Breast Reduction: a Safe and Effective Alternative. A Study of 367 Patients.
    Date June 2009
    Journal Aesthetic Surgery Journal / the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
    Excerpt

    Although several studies have been published documenting the safety of laser-assisted breast reduction, they have involved only small numbers of patients.

    Title Outpatient Reduction Mammaplasty: an Eleven-year Experience.
    Date February 2009
    Journal Aesthetic Surgery Journal / the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery
    Excerpt

    In the last 15 years, reduction mammaplasty has been increasingly performed on an outpatient basis. Despite this evolution, few outcome studies have been published regarding outpatient breast reduction surgery.

    Title Is It Safe to Combine Abdominoplasty with Elective Breast Surgery? A Review of 151 Consecutive Cases.
    Date August 2006
    Journal Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
    Excerpt

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to evaluate and compare the complication rates of patients having abdominoplasty without breast surgery with the rates of those having abdominoplasty with various types of elective breast surgery, including breast augmentation, breast reduction, mastopexy, and mastopexy combined with simultaneous augmentation. METHODS: The data collected represent a retrospective chart review of consecutive abdominoplasty procedures performed at a single outpatient facility by the senior surgeon (W.G.S.) over a 15-year period (1989 to 2004). Two groups were compared: patients who underwent abdominoplasty without breast surgery and those who had abdominoplasty with breast surgery. The second group was subdivided by the various types of breast procedures noted above. The minor complications assessed included seromas, hematomas, infections, and small (<5 cm) wound breakdowns. Major complications evaluated included large (>5 cm) flap necrosis, need for blood transfusion, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, myocardial infarction, and death. Additional data compiled included age, sex, tobacco use, body mass index, past medical history, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status level, and operative times. RESULTS: Of the 415 abdominoplasty procedures, 264 (group 1) did not include simultaneous breast surgery. One hundred fifty-one procedures (group 2) involved simultaneous breast surgery, representing 36 percent of the total. Group 2 was further subdivided into those who had breast augmentation surgery (group 2A, n = 50), those who had breast reduction surgery (group 2B, n = 31), those who had mastopexy surgery (group 2C, n = 28), and those who had simultaneous mastopexy and breast augmentation surgery (group 2D, n = 42). Removal and replacement of implants and capsulectomy/capsulotomy procedures were included in the augmentation group (group 2A). There were no major complications, including flap necrosis (open wound >5 cm), blood transfusions, deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolus, myocardial infarction, or death. No patients required hospitalization. No statistically significant associations with complications were noted between groups 1 and 2 (chi-square, 0.0045; p > 0.95, not significant). Furthermore, when subdivided by type of breast surgery, no statistically significant associations were noted among subgroups: group 1 versus 2A (chi-square, 0.96; p > 0.05, not significant), group 1 versus 2B (chi-square, 0.032; p > 0.9, not significant), group 1 versus 2C (chi-square, 0.003; p > 0.975, not significant), and group 1 versus 2D (chi-square, 0.83; p > 0.5, not significant). CONCLUSION: The results of this retrospective review indicate that combining elective breast surgery with abdominoplasty does not appear to significantly increase the number of major or minor complications.

    Title Early Immunoneutralization of Calcitonin Precursors Attenuates the Adverse Physiologic Response to Sepsis in Pigs.
    Date November 2002
    Journal Critical Care Medicine
    Excerpt

    OBJECTIVE: The 116 amino acid prohormone procalcitonin and some of its component peptides (collectively termed calcitonin precursors) are important markers and mediators of sepsis. In this study, we sought to evaluate the effect of immunoneutralization of calcitonin precursors on metabolic and physiologic variables of sepsis in a porcine model. DESIGN: A prospective, controlled animal study. SETTING: A university research laboratory. SUBJECTS: 30-kg Yorkshire pigs. INTERVENTIONS: Sepsis was induced in 15 pigs by intraperitoneal instillation of a suspension of cecal content (1 g/kg animal body weight) and a toxinogenic Escherichia coli solution (2 x 10(11) colony-forming units). During induction of sepsis, seven pigs received an intravenous infusion of purified rabbit antiserum, reactive to the aminoterminal portion of porcine prohormone procalcitonin. Another eight control pigs received an intravenous infusion of purified nonreactive rabbit antiserum. For all 15 animals, physiologic data (urine output, core temperature, arterial pressure, heart rate, cardiac index, and stroke volume index) and metabolic data (serum blood urea nitrogen and creatinine, arterial lactate, and pH) were collected or recorded hourly until death at 15 hrs. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: In this large-animal model of rapidly lethal peritonitis, serum calcitonin precursors were significantly elevated. Amino-prohormone procalcitonin-reactive antiserum administration resulted in a significant improvement or a beneficial trend in a majority of the measured physiologic and metabolic derangements induced by sepsis. Specifically, arterial pressure, cardiac index, stroke volume index, pH, and creatinine were all significantly improved, while urine output and serum lactate had beneficial trends. Treated animals also experienced a statistically significant increase of short-term survival. CONCLUSIONS: These data from a large-animal model with polymicrobial sepsis demonstrate the salutary effect of early immunoneutralization of calcitonin precursors on physiologic and metabolic variables. Immunologic blockade of calcitonin precursors may offer a novel therapeutic approach to human sepsis.

    Title Procalcitonin and Proinflammatory Cytokine Interactions in Sepsis.
    Date December 2000
    Journal Shock (augusta, Ga.)
    Excerpt

    Immunoneutralization of procalcitonin (ProCT), a putative mediator of sepsis, has been shown to increase survival in an animal model of sepsis. To better understand the role that ProCT plays in the sepsis cascade, we studied the relationship of this hormone to the proximal proinflammatory mediators, IL-1beta and TNFalpha. Hamsters were made septic by i.p. implantation of Escherichia coli-impregnated agar pellets. A time line study of serum IL-beta, TNFalpha, and ProCT levels showed that the increase in the cytokines was transient and less than 2-fold over baseline, whereas ProCT increased >100-fold by 12 h and remains elevated through 24 h. TNFalpha (400 microg/kg) was injected into healthy animals, inducing an elevation in ProCT that was 25-fold greater than controls. ProCT (30 microg/kg) was given to healthy and septic animals. In healthy animals, there was no significant elevation in serum IL-1beta or TNFalpha levels. In septic animals, IL-1beta was modestly blunted at 3 h but not at 12 h, and there was no change in TNFalpha levels. ProCT did not initiate or enhance IL-1beta or TNFalpha expression; however, the massive and sustained elevation of this hormone seen in sepsis can be induced by the proximal cytokine, TNFalpha. This study suggests that ProCT is a secondary mediator that might augment and amplify but does not initiate the septic response. Immunoneutralization of ProCT may prove to be an important clinical strategy, in view of its sustained elevation and the difficulty in initiating therapy for sepsis during the early phases of illness.

    Title Procalcitonin and Proinflammatory Cytokine in Interactions in Sepsis.
    Date November 1999
    Journal Shock (augusta, Ga.)
    Excerpt

    Immunoneutralization of procalcitonin (ProCT), a putative mediator of sepsis, has been shown to increase survival in an animal model of sepsis. To better understand the role that ProCT plays in the sepsis cascade, we studied the relationship of this hormone to the proximal proinflammatory mediators, IL-1beta and TNFalpha. Hamsters were made septic by i.p. implantation of Escherichia coli-impregnated agar pellets. A time line study of serum IL-beta, TNFalpha, and ProCT levels showed that the increase in the cytokines was transient and less than 2-fold over baseline, whereas ProCT increased >100-fold by 12 h and remains elevated through 24 h. TNFalpha (400 microg/kg) was injected into healthy animals, inducing an elevation in ProCT that was 25-fold greater than controls. ProCT (30 microg/kg) was given to healthy and septic animals. In healthy animals, there was no significant elevation in serum IL-1beta or TNFalpha levels. In septic animals, IL-1beta was modestly blunted at 3 h but not at 12 h, and there was no change in TNFalpha levels. ProCT did not initiate or enhance IL-1beta or TNFalpha expression; however, the massive and sustained elevation of this hormone seen in sepsis can be induced by the proximal cytokine, TNFalpha. This study suggests that ProCT is a secondary mediator that might augment and amplify but does not initiate the septic response. Immunoneutralization of ProCT may prove to be an important clinical strategy, in view of its sustained elevation and the difficulty in initiating therapy for sepsis during the early phases of illness.


    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Andrew Wolfe

    Plastic Surgery
    Golden, CO

    Dr. Amit Agarwala

    Orthopaedic Surgery
    13 years experience
    Golden, CO

    Dr. Sameer Lodha

    Orthopaedic Surgery
    Golden, CO

    Dr. Patrick McNair

    Orthopaedic Surgery
    16 years experience
    Golden, CO

    Dr. Charles Gottlob

    Orthopaedic Surgery
    20 years experience
    Golden, CO

    Dr. Raeburn Jenkins

    Orthopaedic Surgery
    32 years experience
    Golden, CO
    Search All Similar Doctors