Ophthalmologists
13 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Downtown Milford
320 W Commerce St
Milford, MI 48381
248-684-7337
Locations and availability (3)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
The Ohio State University (1997)
  • Currently 3 of 4 apples
Top 50%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Associations
American Academy of Ophthalmology
American Board of Ophthalmology

Affiliations ?

Dr. Cooney is affiliated with 3 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • University of Michigan Hospitals & Health Centers
    1500 E Medical Center Dr, Ann Arbor, MI 48109
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • University of Michigan Health System
  • Ann Arbor Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    2215 Fuller Rd, Ann Arbor, MI 48105
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Cooney has contributed to 13 publications.
    Title Spousal Perceptions of Marital Stress and Support Among Grandparent Caregivers: Variations by Life Stage.
    Date June 2009
    Journal International Journal of Aging & Human Development
    Excerpt

    Few studies have examined how raising grandchildren influences the marital relationship of grandparent caregivers although half of such caregivers are married. This study used national survey data from Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS) to contrast perceptions of spousal support and strain for grandparents who had recently provided care for grandchildren along with their own young children (n=16), and grandparents who had recently cared for grandchildren only (n=96). Results revealed an interaction between caregivers' sex and family situation with grandmother caregivers who were raising both their own minor children and grandchildren reporting less spousal support than grandfathers in the same situation. Differences on the spousal strain dimension were not significant. Grandmother caregivers occupying 2 caregiving roles appear to have a unique experience with caring for grandchildren. These results parallel other studies that show that grandparent caregivers have poorer outcomes when they hold multiple caregiving roles simultaneously.

    Title Remembered Parenting Styles and Adjustment in Middle and Late Adulthood.
    Date April 2009
    Journal The Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
    Excerpt

    Authoritative parenting is the parenting style often associated with positive outcomes for children and adolescents. This study considers whether remembered parenting styles in childhood predict multiple dimensions of functioning in adulthood.

    Title Keratomalacia Caused by Psychiatric-induced Dietary Restrictions.
    Date December 2007
    Journal Cornea
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: To describe the unique presentation, clinical course, management, and outcome of vitamin A deficiency-induced keratomalacia leading to bilateral corneal melts and ulcers in a patient with severe dietary restrictions because of psychiatric disease. METHODS: Review of patient's record and literature pertinent to her condition. RESULTS: A 33-year-old woman with a phobia of consuming most foods presented with bilateral corneal ulcers and melts from an unusual case of keratomalacia caused by vitamin A deficiency. The disease process progressed to bilateral perforations necessitating emergent bilateral penetrating keratoplasties. Pathologic examination confirmed classic signs of xerosis and keratomalacia. To our knowledge, our case is unique in that it is the only one in which the histopathology of the corneal lesion is described. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric diseases, particularly eating disorders limiting sufficient nutrient intake, can lead to severe ocular surface disease that can be both vision- and life threatening.

    Title Women in the Middle: Generational Position and Grandmothers' Adjustment to Raising Grandchildren.
    Date November 2006
    Journal Journal of Women & Aging
    Excerpt

    This study compared the adjustment of two groups of grandmothers who were providing primary care for grandchildren in split-generation households: 25 grandmothers in the oldest generation of their families (G1), and 22 grandmothers who had living parents or in-laws (G2). It was hypothesized that because of potential demands on them as middle-generation women, G2 grandmothers would report greater burden and depression in their caregiving roles than G1 grandmothers. After controlling for numerous factors that are associated with generational position, the hypothesis was confirmed. In addition to being in the middle generation, having grandchildren with problems predicted elevated depression and burden. Grandmothers who were educated beyond high school also reported greater role burden.

    Title Adjustment Problems in Adolescence: Are Multiracial Children at Risk?
    Date July 2001
    Journal The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
    Excerpt

    Data from a national survey were used to compare adjustment between a group of multiracial adolescents and two groups of single-race adolescents, grades seven to twelve. Significant differences were found on fewer than half of the school, behavioral, and psychological dimensions that were assessed. Implications for research and school interventions are discussed.

    Title Relationship Quality Between Multiracial Adolescents and Their Biological Parents.
    Date July 2001
    Journal The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
    Excerpt

    National survey data were used to compare single-race white and minority adolescents with multiracial adolescents in terms of relationships with their parents. Three relational dimensions were considered: association/interaction, communication, and emotional closeness. Comparable relationship quality was found between parents and adolescents in all three groups, except that multiracial boys and their fathers were found to be less emotionally close and communicative. Implications for research are discussed.

    Title Young Adults' Relations with Grandparents Following Recent Parental Divorce.
    Date September 1996
    Journal The Journals of Gerontology. Series B, Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
    Excerpt

    This study employed a large survey of young adults to consider the association between recent parental divorce and intergenerational solidarity between adult grandchildren and their grandparents. The results indicate no significant association between parental divorce and young adults' reports of affective, associational, or functional solidarity in relation to either maternal or paternal grandparents. Adult grandchildren from divorced families, however, were more likely than those from intact families to initiate contacts with their grandparents on their own, and to see their paternal grandparents without their father accompanying them. We conclude that parental divorce does not influence adult grandchild-grandparent relations because, at least in part, adult grandchildren are less dependent than young children on the middle-generation parent to facilitate this relationship.

    Title Family Size and Mother-child Relations in Later Life.
    Date March 1991
    Journal The Gerontologist
    Excerpt

    What effect does family size have on mother-child relationships in later life? From the child's perspective, does sibsize affect the level of interaction and quality of the relationship? From the mother's perspective, does family size affect the amount of contact with and support received from children? These questions are examined using data from the National Survey of Families and Households conducted in 1987-88. The findings show that family size does make a difference, both for adult children and for older mothers.

    Title Male and Female Physicians: Family and Career Comparisons.
    Date April 1990
    Journal Social Science & Medicine (1982)
    Excerpt

    This article compares career and family characteristics for male and female physicians aged 30-49 in the United States. Despite women's increased presence in the profession, male physicians still out-earn and work more hours than their female counterparts. Males are also more often involved in families than are females. Compared with the U.S. population, male physicians are more likely to marry and parent, while the opposite is true for female physicians. The work-family interface also provides dramatic gender differences. Marriage and parenting, which might be expected to impinge on physicians' careers, actually seem to spur men's work commitment and earnings, but have the reverse effect for women. A review of research findings from other industrialized countries reveals similar gender differences in physicians' work and family patterns. The consequence of women's increased presence in the medical profession are discussed in light of these marked gender contrast in work and family life.

    Title Co-residence with Adult Children: a Comparison of Divorced and Widowed Women.
    Date March 1990
    Journal The Gerontologist
    Excerpt

    This study compares patterns of co-residence with adult offspring for divorcées and widows, aged 40 and over, using 1985 Current Population Survey data. Co-residence with offspring is most likely for recent widows in midlife and recent divorcées in later life. Older recent divorcées are less likely than recent widows to be household heads in these living situations. Finally, daughters appear especially important in the co-resident situation of divorcées. These results are discussed in light of changing patterns of divorce and widowhood in later life.

    Title Young Adults and Parental Divorce: Exploring Important Issues.
    Date October 1989
    Journal Human Relations; Studies Towards the Integration of the Social Sciences
    Excerpt

    This article discusses the potential impact of parental divorce on the lives of young adult offspring. Parental divorce may upset both social and psychological aspects of the transition to adulthood process. The family roles young adults are expected to assume could be altered by the break-up, as could opportunities for particular young adult pursuits, such as advanced education. Heightened adjustment problems also are likely to result, as divorce produces additional life changes during the highly transitional period of early adulthood. Qualitative data from an exploratory study of 39 college students, ages 18-23, illustrate many of the relevant issues. Suggestions for future research are provided.

    Title The Relationship Between Prior Functioning on Cognitive and Personality Dimensions and Subject Attrition in Longitudinal Research.
    Date February 1988
    Journal Journal of Gerontology
    Excerpt

    This study compared the intellectual and personality functioning of continuing participants in a longitudinal study with individuals who were lost from the panel after at least 7 years of involvement. Based on their reason for discontinuation, participants who were lost to the panel were categorized into three attrition groups: deceased, ill, and voluntary dropouts. When the performance of these groups prior to leaving the study was compared with that of the continuing participants, no general differences were found. However, specific differences were revealed, particularly on crystallized-type intellectual abilities and the personality factors. Participants who were lost due to illness or death had functioned at the lowest levels of the four groups prior to attrition. These effects varied by age. In late middle age, ill participants functioned at the lowest levels, whereas in old age, participants who subsequently died scored lowest of the four groups prior to attrition. Individuals who had voluntarily discontinued participation in the study most closely resembled the continuing participants, particularly in late middle age. The results indicate that performance effects associated with continued participation vary by age, the intelligence or personality factor being considered, and the reason for loss of the participant. Furthermore, they suggest that loss of participants from a longitudinal panel does not inevitably bias the validity of developmental findings.

    Title Parental Divorce in Young Adulthood: Some Preliminary Findings.
    Date September 1986
    Journal The American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
    Excerpt

    Developmental differences in reactions to parental divorce have not been examined beyond adolescence, and the impact of divorce on older offspring has thus been minimized. Central themes that emerged from an exploratory study of 18-to-23-year-olds suggest that the break-up of their parents' marriage represents a critical event deserving of further attention from researchers and clinicians.


    Similar doctors nearby

    Dr. Robert Arends

    Ophthalmology
    44 years experience
    Milford, MI

    Dr. David Wadowski

    Ophthalmology
    13 years experience
    Novi, MI

    Dr. Shabbir Khambati

    Ophthalmology
    12 years experience
    Novi, MI

    Dr. Holly Holm

    Ophthalmology
    20 years experience
    Brighton, MI

    Dr. Tiffany Szymarek

    Ophthalmology
    Brighton, MI

    Dr. Garron Klepach

    Ophthalmology
    42 years experience
    West Bloomfield, MI
    Search All Similar Doctors