Surgical Specialist, Urologists
11 years of experience
Video profile
Accepting new patients
Temple University Hospital
3401 N Broad St
Philadelphia, PA 19140
215-707-3375
Locations and availability (5)

Education ?

Medical School Score Rankings
University of Pennsylvania (1999)
  • Currently 4 of 4 apples
Top 25%

Awards & Distinctions ?

Appointments
University of Pennsylvania
Assistant Professor of Urology in Surgery at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and Penn Presbyterian Medical Center
Associations
American Urological Association
Member
American Urological Association (urologyhealth.org)
Member
Laser.understandbph.com (holmiumforbph)
Member
Understandbph.com (prolieve)
Member

Affiliations ?

Dr. Jaffe is affiliated with 12 hospitals.

Hospital Affilations

Score

Rankings

  • Hospital of the University of PA
    3400 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Pennsylvania Hospital University PA Health System
    Urology
    800 Spruce St, Philadelphia, PA 19107
    • Currently 4 of 4 crosses
    Top 25%
  • Jeanes Hospital
    7600 Central Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19111
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • University of PA Medical Center/Presbyterian
    Urology
    51 N 39th St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
    • Currently 3 of 4 crosses
    Top 50%
  • Temple University Hospital
    3401 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19140
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Temple University Children's Medical Center
    3509 N Broad St, Philadelphia, PA 19140
    • Currently 2 of 4 crosses
  • Graduate Hospital
    1800 Lombard St, Philadelphia, PA 19146
    • Currently 1 of 4 crosses
  • Clinical Practices of the University of Pennsylvania
  • Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center
    3900 Woodland Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19104
  • Episcopal Hospital
  • Temple University Hospital - Episcopal Campus
    100 E Lehigh Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19125
  • University of Penn Med Center-Presb Med Group
  • Publications & Research

    Dr. Jaffe has contributed to 7 publications.
    Title Decreasing Electrosurgical Transurethral Resection of the Prostate Surgical Volume During Graduate Medical Education Training is Associated with Increased Surgical Adverse Events.
    Date April 2010
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    In the United States the numbers of electrosurgical transurethral prostate resection procedures have been decreasing. Since electrosurgical transurethral resection of the prostate is a difficult procedure to master, we hypothesized that recent residents are lacking in training for this procedure. We used summary case log information provided by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education to determine if the number of electrosurgical transurethral prostate resection procedures performed by graduating chief residents has decreased and if there has been an increase in surgical adverse events. In addition, we investigated whether the increased number of laser procedures impacted the rate of adverse events.

    Title Prostatitis: Updates on Diagnostic Evaluation.
    Date July 2008
    Journal Current Urology Reports
    Excerpt

    Prostatitis accounts for almost 2 million office visits to urologists and primary care physicians. The label "prostatitis" refers to a diverse constellation of symptoms and disease processes. The diagnosis and treatment of this disorder present numerous challenges for the physician, including a lack of abnormal findings on physical examination, laboratory tests, and radiographic images. In this article, we offer a review of the current literature and recommendations for the evaluation and diagnosis of the patient presenting with prostatitis.

    Title Overactive Bladder in the Male Patient: Epidemiology, Etiology, Evaluation, and Treatment.
    Date May 2006
    Journal Current Urology Reports
    Excerpt

    The urologist's approach to the diagnosis and treatment of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in male patients has changed significantly over the past decade. Advances in the basic science arena combined with a wealth of clinical data have pointed to the importance of bladder pathophysiology in the development of urinary symptoms. Historically, men with LUTS were diagnosed with "prostatism," an all-encompassing term that includes both voiding and storage symptoms that may or may not be related to prostatic obstruction. Parallel to the scientific advances in the field, the urologic lexicon began to evolve and has allowed us to more specifically describe, and therefore investigate and treat, different aspects of male LUTS. It is now well recognized that many men suffer from storage symptoms that may be more related to bladder dysfunction than to prostatic obstruction. It will be critical to integrate our knowledge of prostatic growth and obstruction, the bladder response to outlet obstruction, environmental and lifestyle factors, and age-related changes to fully understand the complex pathophysiology of male LUTS, specifically overactive bladder syndrome.

    Title The Role of Renal Salvage Procedures for Bilateral Wilms Tumor: a 15-year Review.
    Date January 2000
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    PURPOSE: We reviewed our experience with renal salvage procedures in patients with bilateral Wilms tumor to determine the clinical outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1982 to 1997, 23 children with bilateral Wilms tumor were treated with partial nephrectomy at our institution, including 7 who were also treated with brachytherapy. Medical history, use and response to chemotherapy and brachytherapy, operative records, renal function, pathological results, survival, and techniques for partial and repeat nephrectomy and brachytherapy were reviewed. RESULTS: We treated 8 boys and 15 girls, of whom 21 who presented with synchronous bilateral Wilms tumor underwent primary chemotherapy followed by secondary partial nephrectomy. A total of 44 partial nephrectomies were performed and brachytherapy was done in 7 patients. Ten children have normal renal function and no disease, 10 are dead and 2 have metastatic disease. Anaplasia was the most significant factor associated with an unfavorable outcome (p = 0.003). Of the patients who were cured 60% had a positive response to initial chemotherapy compared with only 25% who had an unfavorable outcome (p = 0.09). No significant differences were noted with respect to gender, age at presentation, highest local tumor stage at presentation or initial nephrectomy. No patient treated with brachytherapy had local recurrence. CONCLUSIONS: Preoperative chemotherapy followed by nephron sparing surgery is indicated in patients with bilateral Wilms tumor, while in those with diffuse anaplasia nephron sparing surgery is contraindicated. Brachytherapy should be considered for treating local disease involving chemoresistant tumors.

    Title Ovarian Torsion Mimicking Urological Disease.
    Date December 1998
    Journal The Journal of Urology
    Title Nonseminomatous Germ Cell Tumor of the Testis 9 Years After a Germ Cell Tumor of the Pineal Gland: Case Report and Review of the Literature.
    Date
    Journal The Canadian Journal of Urology
    Excerpt

    Extragonadal germ cell tumors are extremely rare and account for only 3%-5% of all germ cell tumors. These tumors are rarely associated with metachronous primary testicular germ cell tumors. We report the fourth case of a primary germ cell tumor occurring after the treatment of a primary CNS germ cell tumor in a 27 year-old male with embryonal cell carcinoma of the testicle 9 years after the treatment of a germ cell tumor of the pineal gland. This represents the first case of a non-seminomatous germ cell tumor of the testicle after a CNS germ cell tumor. This case illustrates the importance of long term follow-up and self-examination in patients with extragonadal germ cell tumors.

    Title Gunshot Wounds to the Scrotum: a Large Single-institutional 20-year Experience.
    Date
    Journal Bju International
    Excerpt

    Study Type - Therapy (case series) Level of Evidence 4 What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? Penetrating trauma to the scrotum often requires operative intervention, with testicular salvage only possible when enough testicular tissue can be re-approximated in the traumatic setting. The present report represents the largest series of gunshot wound trauma to the scrotum in the literature. Further, it validates recommendations of the European Association of Urology guidelines on urological trauma that advocate operative intervention due to minimal rates of patient morbidity and the inherent limitations of scrotal ultrasonography in discerning testicular compromise.

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