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Quick Facts

  • Accepted Insurance

  • United Healthcare
  • BCBS Blue Card
  • Cigna
  • Aetna
  • Multiplan
  • Doctors Specializing in Cardiology

  • Dr. Jason Rogers MD Cardiovascular Disease, Interventional Cardiology, Cardiology, Internal Medicine Sacramento, CA
    4.1 (3)
  • Dr. John Laird MD Cardiovascular Disease, Interventional Cardiology, Cardiology, Internal Medicine Sacramento, CA
    4.3 (6)

Specialties

47 specialties

  • Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiologists help doctors get a closer look at what’s happening inside your body. If your primary care doctor wants to investigate your symptoms further, they may refer you to a radiologist to get an ultrasound or x-ray. Some radiologists specialize in mammography and breast imaging, which is who you see when you need a mammogram. A Radiologist can also determine if bones are broken or fractured after any kind of accident.
    Radiologists are trained to perform MRIs and CT scans, both of which are used to determine the presence of diseases or disorders and help your doctor properly diagnose you. They can detect anything from tumors, bleeding and infections to bone and muscle disorders.

  • Radiology

    A radiologist is a physician who specializes in the use of medical imaging to diagnose and treat illnesses or injuries in patients.
    The different types of medical imaging are X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and nuclear medicine.
    Radiologists are experts in these different types of tests and can advise a primary care doctor on which test is most appropriate in a specific case. These doctors also assist primary care doctors in analyzing the images produced by these tests in order to determine next steps necessary for treatment.

  • Orthopedic Surgery

    An orthopaedic surgeon is a physician who specializes in diagnosis and surgical treatment of injuries and disorders involving the musculoskeletal system, such as hip replacements and arthroscopic knee surgery.
    In addition to treating trauma to the musculoskeletal system, these doctors also deal with sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

  • Pediatrics

    A pediatrician is a doctor who specializes in the regular care of children, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of illness in children. Young patients are often more complicated to treat because they are still growing and developing.
    While pediatricians may sub-specialize in specific therapy areas like oncology, surgery, ophthalmology, and anesthesiology, in general, pediatricians provide services like vaccinations, health exams, and treatment of common ailments and injuries. In addition, pediatricians are trained to handle the complex emotional and behavioral issues faced by children, especially during puberty.
    Pediatricians normally see their patients from birth until the age of 18, although some may agree to treat patients into their early 20s, if requested.

  • Anesthesiology

    Anesthesiologists are physicians who are trained to administer anesthetics, which are medicines used to block nerve sensation. Anesthesia can be either local to one specific part of a body, like a tooth, or regional to block feeling to a larger portion of the body, such as during an epidural for child birth. It can also be more general to block sensation to the entire body, resulting in unconsciousness.
    Anesthesiologists assist in surgery by determining how much anesthesia is necessary and by monitoring the patient's level of responsiveness and vital signs throughout the procedure. The anesthesia specialist will also bring the patient out of anesthesia and then continue to monitor his or her vital signs post-operation.
    Besides assisting in surgeries, anesthesiologists may also treat patients suffering from chronic pain.

  • General Surgery

    A surgical specialist is a physician who has additional training in a specific area of surgery.
    The American Board of Medical Specialties acknowledges the following surgical specialties: general surgery, thoracic and cardiac surgery, colon and rectal surgery, obstetrics and gynecological surgery, neurological surgery, ophthalmic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngological surgery, pediatric surgery, plastic surgery, urological surgery, and vascular surgery.
    Some procedures are performed by more than one type of specialist. Also, some surgeons may choose to specialize in specific procedures within their specialty area. For example, a plastic and maxillofacial surgeon may specialize in performing rhinoplasty procedures.

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

    An obstetrician & gynecologist, or OB/GYN, is a physician who cares for women throughout their pregnancies, straight through to the delivery of their baby (obstetrician). They also specialize in annual care, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the female reproductive system (gynecologist). Many physicians specialize in both of these fields in order to provide complete overall health services to women at every stage of life.

  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    A physiatrist is a doctor who specializes in the rehabilitation and physiological treatment of patients with an illness or injury that affects movement.
    These specialists have extensive knowledge of the nerves, muscles, bone, and brain. Physiatrists are also experts in pain medication.
    Some common conditions that physiatrists treat are rheumatoid arthritis, neurological and spinal disorders and injuries, chronic pain disorders, like fibromyalgia, and musculoskeletal issues, like broken bones and torn muscles.
    These physicians also often coordinate a team of other specialists in order to maximize the patient's recovery, such as occupational therapists, speech therapists, neurologists, orthopedists, and counselors.

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Neurology

    A neurologist is a physician who diagnoses and treats disorders of the nervous system which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves. These doctors do not perform surgery, but refer patients to neurological surgeons when they determine that surgical intervention is necessary.
    Some of the conditions that neurologists diagnose and treat are epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    In addition to using diagnostic tests like MRI, CT scans, EEG and EMG, neurologists also employ neurological testing to gauge muscle strength and movement, balance, reflexes, sensation, memory, speech, and other cognitive abilities.

  • Family Medicine

    A family practitioner is a doctor who specializes in caring for people of all ages, at all stages of life. Rather than focusing on the treatment of one disease or patient population, family practitioners are often the doctors that people see for their everyday ailments, like cold and flu or respiratory infections, and health screenings. When necessary, family practitioners will provide referrals for conditions that require the expertise of another specialist.
    The doctors may also provide physicals, inoculations, prenatal care, treat chronic diseases, like diabetes and asthma, and provide advice on disease prevention.

  • Emergency Medicine

    An emergency physician is a doctor who is an expert in handling conditions of an urgent and extremely dangerous nature. These specialists work in the emergency room (ER) departments of hospitals where they oversee cases involving cardiac distress, trauma, fractures, lacerations and other acute conditions.
    Emergency physicians are specially trained to make urgent life-saving decisions to treat patients during an emergency medical crisis. These doctors diagnose and stabilize patients before they are either well enough to be discharged, or transferred to the appropriate department for long-term care.

  • Ophthalmology

    An ophthalmologist has the training to do much more than just prescribe glasses. They are physicians specially trained to diagnose and treat disorders of the eyes and vision. These doctors are experts on the complicated anatomy of the eye and are trained to treat eye diseases through both medical and surgical methods.
    Some common conditions that ophthalmologists treat are cataracts, glaucoma, strabismus, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and amblyopia. In addition, ophthalmologists can provide prescriptions for eye glasses and contact lenses and perform LASIK surgery and other corrective surgeries for refractive errors like myopia (near-sightedness), hyperopia (far-sightedness), astigmatism and presbyopia.

  • Psychiatry

    A psychiatrist is a doctor with specific training in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness.
    He or she can not only provide the counseling necessary to both diagnose and treat a patient, but can also prescribe medication when needed. In some cases, a psychiatrist will only provide the medication and the counseling will be provided by another healthcare specialist, like a certified counselor or psychologist.
    Like other doctors, psychiatrists employ diagnostic tools like CT scans and MRI in order to observe the structure and function of a patient's brain.
    Once a diagnosis is made, these specialists may use behavior or cognitive therapy in order to address the patient's condition, or a multitude of other types of therapy, in conjunction with or in place of medication.

  • Urology

    A urologist is a physician who specializes in diagnosing and treating conditions affecting the male reproductive system, as well as the urinary tracts of both males and females.
    These doctors cover the kidneys, ureter, urinary bladder, adrenal glands, urethra, and the male reproductive organs which include the testes, epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, prostate and penis. Some common disorders that urologists treat are urinary tract infections (UTI), stress incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia, kidney stones, erectile dysfunction, kidney cancer, prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and cystitis. These urological specialists also perform vasectomies and vasectomy reversals.

  • Plastic Surgery

    A plastic surgery specialist is a physician with extensive training in the execution of plastic surgery procedures.
    Plastic surgery is the use of surgical procedures to rebuild or reshape injured or misshapen body parts. Congenital defects, such as a cleft lip or palate, can be corrected by a plastic surgery specialist. Injuries sustained during auto accidents also may require the services of a plastic surgery specialist. These procedures fall under the category of reconstructive plastic surgery.
    The other category of plastic surgery is cosmetic plastic surgery. Plastic surgery specialists often perform procedures like breast augmentation, face lifts, tummy tucks, liposuction, and lip injection as elective surgeries for patients who wish to make aesthetic improvements.

  • Sports Medicine

    A sports medicine specialist is a physician who is trained to diagnose and treat injuries and conditions caused by participation in athletic activities.
    These doctors are generally employed by professional sports teams to care for the athletes who are injured. They have extensive knowledge of the types of injuries that athletes are most susceptible to, such as stress fractures, sprains, concussions, muscle cramps, ACL injuries, and shin splints.
    It is the responsibility of sports medicine specialist to clear athletes to return to the playing field when they are deemed fit. These doctors also advise athletes on how to avoid injury through proper care of their bodies while training.

  • Neurological Surgery

    A neurological surgeon is a physician who surgically treats disorders of the nervous system, which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves.
    In addition to treating trauma of the head and spine, these doctors also treat disorders like epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    Neurological surgeons can perform surgical procedures on the brain, such as stereotactic surgery, microsurgery, endoscopic surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and endovascular image guided methods.

  • Pediatric Emergency Medicine

    If your child ever becomes unstable and you rush to the hospital, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist will work to quickly diagnose the condition, start treatment and then continue to monitor symptoms until he/she is stable again. They are pediatricians specifically trained to handle medical emergencies and make quick decisions to treat infants and children.
    They have experience treating allergic reactions, poisonings, trauma injuries from accidents and complications that arise from any chronic illnesses, congenital conditions, asthma or diabetes. They can also diagnose the source of severe symptoms like fever, seizures and trouble breathing to get parents more answers.

  • Gastroenterology

    A gastroenterologist is a specialist in diagnosis and treatment of conditions involving the digestive/gastrointestinal (GI) tract. These doctors are experts on how food moves through the digestive system and is chemically broken down, with nutrients being absorbed and waste excreted. You might see this kind of doctor if you are experiencing any number of stomach issues, some of which might be severe diarrhea, irritable bowel syndrome, hemorrhoids, ulcers, acid reflux, Crohn's disease and more.

  • Trauma Surgery

    Trauma surgeons treat patients who come to emergency rooms and require surgery after any kind of accident. They know how to act quickly, assess the patient’s condition, and decide on a course of action. They work fast to coordinate with other physicians and specialists in the hospital if needed, such as neurosurgeons and radiologists, so they can properly diagnose the injury and stabilize patients.
    Common trauma injuries include bleeding, burns, brain or other internal injuries, shock and loss of limbs. Because they treat patients in traumatic situations, they’re also typically skilled in offering some level of emotional support to help the patient cope with confusion and grief that may result from their accident.

  • Pediatric Critical Care Medicine

    While pediatricians are typically the go-to resource when your child gets sick, more serious conditions require special care and closer monitoring. A pediatric critical care specialist works in a hospital setting to treat, diagnose and care for children with chronic conditions.
    They're trained to examine and treat children using unique methods and equipment in order to provide a more comfortable experience. A reaction due to asthma or diabetes, a serious injury from an accident, or on-going symptoms due to a serious disease are some reasons your child might end up in a pediatric intensive care unit.

  • Neuroradiology

    Neuroradiologists focus specifically on diagnosing conditions related to the nervous system, spine, head and neck through radiology. They can identify abnormalities in these areas and help doctors properly diagnose the presence of tumors, aneurysms and even dementia.
    It’s also common for them to consult with patients with persistent headaches or back pains, trauma to a certain area, or any issue that can affect brain function, such as a stroke. Like any radiologist, they are trained to perform x-rays, cat scans, ultrasounds and MRIs, but they work closely with neurologists and neurosurgeons.

  • Vascular Surgery

    Vascular surgeons treat and manage disorders in your veins, arteries and your lymphatic system to ensure blood circulation in your heart and in brain is the best it can be. They're well-versed on how your vascular system works with the rest of your body and they can treat conditions that may cause blockages or buildup.
    They can perform many of the same diagnostic testing as interventional radiologists can, such as angiography and MRIs. In addition to diagnosis, they provide critical care and treatment for aneurysms, artery blockages and trauma injuries that involve your veins. They can also help patients manage diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as treat artery disease. Treatment for more serious cases might include bypass surgery or surgery to remove plaque.

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Interventional Cardiology

    An interventional cardiologist has the same training as a cardiologist and they're well-versed in all types of heart disease and how to diagnose heart problems. The difference is that interventional cardiologists have additional expertise and training on specific interventional treatments for heart disease, such as angioplasties and stents. These methods use catheterization, which reduces recovery time as well as scarring after surgery.

  • Hematology and Oncology

    An Oncologist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of different cancers. This physician has extensive knowledge of the different signs and symptoms of cancer, as well as the various methods of treatment.
    Oncologists diagnose cancer through methods such as biopsy, endoscopy, X-ray, blood tests, ultrasound, and different forms of nuclear medicine. They treat cancer through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormone therapy, or antibody treatments.
    If it is determined that a cancer cannot successfully be treated, oncologists then focus on providing palliative care, the use of pain medication to make a dying person more comfortable.

  • Orthopedics Reconstructive Surgery

    Orthopedic reconstructive surgeons deal with injuries and deformities of your bones and muscles. If you ever need a hip, knee or shoulder replacement — whether due to a sports injury or aging — an orthopedic surgeon will consult with you and answer any questions you have before scheduling an operation. After surgery, you’ll have a few checkups to ensure everything heals properly.
    In addition to shoulders, hips and knees, they deal with injuries everywhere from your ankles and feet to your elbows and hands — and even your spine. They also help treat birth defects related to bones and muscles as well as degenerative conditions like osteoporosis and muscular dystrophy.

  • Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine

    An osteopath is a physician who is trained in the philosophy of osteopathic medicine. These doctors have a D.O. degree which stands for Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine, as opposed to M.D. for Medical Doctor.
    Osteopathic medicine differs from conventional medicine, which is sometimes referred to as allopathic medicine, in that they incorporate a type of manual therapy called Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine (OMM) into their treatment in which they manipulate the spine in order to relieve pain when other methods have not been successful. This is reflective of the philosophical difference between the two types of physicians; osteopaths are trained to treat the body as a whole in the belief that the body is structured with the ability to heal itself while medical doctors treat specific illnesses or symptoms.
    Overall, osteopaths and medical doctors in the US are both equally qualified to treat patients and they work in the same settings and provide the same treatments.

  • Surgical Oncology

    Surgical oncologists play various roles in treating cancer. They can perform biopsies to determine if a tumor is cancerous or not. If it is, they’re trained to remove the tumor, tissue, and in some cases, all or part of an organ or bodily structure where the cancer has spread. In addition to removing cancer, they can perform any reconstructive surgeries that may be necessary.
    Many surgical oncologists specialize in certain types of cancer, such as liver, lung or breast. Don’t be afraid to ask them what they have the most experience treating. When looking for a doctor, it’s important to know that general surgeons are also qualified to perform many of the same surgeries. However, surgical oncologists have specific training in recognizing and treating cancer, which some patients prefer.

  • Pathology

    A pathologist is a physician who specializes in the causes and paths taken by different diseases in order to accurately diagnose an illness.
    Pathologists diagnose and determine the characteristics of a disease through the study of biopsies of diseased tissue or of bodily fluids. For example, a pathologist will look at a biopsy of a skin lesion in order to diagnose or rule out skin cancer. A pathologist will also look at a Pap smear in order to check for a gynecological cancer like cancer of the uterus.
    In addition to determining the cause and development of a disease, these specialists also study the changes a disease makes to a body and the consequences of those structural changes.

  • Pediatric Endocrinology

    Endocrinologists treat disorders related to our glands and the hormones they produce. Because hormones play a key role in the growth and development of children, these conditions often pose different threats to children than they do adults. That’s where a pediatric endocrinologist comes in.
    They can diagnose and treat hormonal disorders such as abnormal thyroid function, growth complications and early or delayed puberty. Ambiguous genitals as well as ovarian and testicular dysfunction are also part of their expertise. Childhood obesity, diabetes and problems with low blood sugar also tie back to hormone function and may require consulting with a pediatric endocrinologist.

  • Dermatology

    A dermatologist is a doctor who has extensive training and knowledge of the skin, scalp, hair and nails and treats conditions that affect those areas. These doctors will evaluate any abnormality, blemish or lesion on the skin in order to determine the cause and will determine a course of treatment.
    Dermatologists provide patients with full body scans in order to identify any signs that are indicative of an illness that requires treatment, such as skin cancer. These specialists may also provide cosmetic services, such as mole removal, scar diminishing treatments and even botox and face lifts.

  • Residency
  • Pediatric Cardiology

    Pediatric cardiologists are pediatricians with additional, specialized, training in the heart health of your children. When infants are born with congenital heart disease or abnormal hearts, pediatric cardiologists get involved as soon as possible — sometimes before the child is even born.
    Through specific testing, they can diagnose the problem and care for the child throughout their treatment, which could range from medication to surgery and transplants. Other heart conditions they treat include arrhythmias, heart murmurs, holes in the heart and viral infections that affect blood flow.

  • Aerospace Medicine

    If you’re a pilot, flight attendant or astronaut, you may benefit from consulting with an aerospace medical physician. They specialize in health risks and conditions associated with traveling into abnormal air and space environments, usually caused by pressure and altitude changes or reduced oxygen levels. This includes hypoxia, ebullism and hypobaria.
    Other areas of expertise include jet lag, dehydration and your body’s response to thermal stress, which can influence your decision making ability. More serious conditions might include G-induced loss of consciousness (known as G-LOC), spatial disorientation and space adaptation syndrome, a sickness common when your body is adjusting to weightlessness.

  • Orthopedic Surgery of the Spine

    If you have a back injury or unexplained back pain, your doctor might refer you first to a radiologist and then to an orthopedic spinal surgeon. They specialize in the spine and can diagnose and treat spinal diseases such as scoliosis. They can also treat spinal injuries such as a displaced disc or a fracture, as well as disc degeneration and narrowing that occurs due to aging.
    However, when your injury or condition affects the spinal canal or spinal cord, it’s typically better to consult with a neurosurgeon. It's worth noting that, while they're both referred to as surgeons, they can also recommend treatments that don't require an operation, such as non-surgical decompression therapy.

  • Radiation Oncology

    A radiation oncologist is a physician who specializes in the use of nuclear medicine in diagnosing and treating cancer in a patient.
    These doctors work in concert with other cancer specialists in order to determine the best form of treatment for a specific patient. Radiation oncologists are in charge of determining the correct dose of radiation to be used in treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy, as well as the appropriate amount of time that radiation should be administered in order to maximize the therapeutic benefits.

  • Bariatric Medicine

    Bariatric medicine focuses on the causes, prevention and treatment of obesity. Bariatric specialists are trained in medically supervised weight loss and the management of obesity as a chronic condition. These specialists are skilled in various disciplines that help patients lose weight and obtain optimal health.
    The field encompasses dieting, exercise and behavioral therapy, anti-obesity medication, pharmacotherapy and surgery. Bariatric specialists might be from surgical backgrounds and perform obesity-related operations or they might be nutrition and hormone focused, prescribing diet and exercise plans as well as weight loss medications.
    Patients defined as obese or having unhealthy Body Mass Indices (BMI) have much greater risk of heart disease, diabetes, asthma, sleep apnea, hypertension, many types of cancer and chronic musculoskeletal problems.
    One subspecialty of bariatrics is the focus on the correlation between obesity and mortality.

  • Pediatric Surgery

    A pediatric surgeon is a qualified surgeon who has additional training in performing surgery on young patients, including fetuses (neonatal or fetal surgery), infants, children, adolescents and teenagers.
    Because pediatric patients are still growing and developing, they are often more difficult to operate on than adults. These patients have smaller bodies and smaller organs requiring even more of a precise and measured approach by a surgeon.
    Some of the conditions that may require the care of a pediatric surgeon are congenital malformations, such as cleft lip and palate, abdominal wall defects, like hernias, deformities of the chest wall, childhood tumors, like neuroblastomas and separation of conjoined twins.

  • Nephrology

    A nephrologist is a physician who is specially trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the kidneys or renal system.
    A nephrologist will determine through urine analysis, blood test, X-ray, sonogram, or kidney biopsy how well the kidneys are functioning and will then prescribe a special diet and exercise program, medication or dialysis - a process by which a machine filters the blood when the kidney is no longer capable of doing so.

  • Thoracic Surgery

    If you need surgery to treat a complication in your chest, which includes your lungs, esophagus, diaphragm and heart, your doctor will refer you to a thoracic surgeon. They’re trained to offer surgical treatment for tumors and abnormalities in these areas as well as respiratory and heart conditions like lung cancer, heart disease and diseases in the diaphragm.
    Thoracic surgeons are similar to heart surgeons, except they have additional training in the entire cardiorespiratory system and in how your blood vessels work with your lungs and airways. They’re also trained on catheters used in the chest, as well as cardiac and respiratory support systems that might be part of your treatment plan.

  • Infectious Disease

    An infectious disease specialist has specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of contagious diseases.
    Infectious diseases, also known as contagious or transmissible diseases, are those that stem from pathogen from a host organism. These infections may spread to other carriers through physical touch, airborne inhalation, bodily fluids or contaminated foods.
    Infectious disease specialists identify whether the disease is caused by bacteria, a virus, a fungus or a parasite often through blood tests and then determine what course of treatment, if any, is necessary.

  • Nuclear Medicine

    Nuclear medicine specialists are doctors who have extensive training in the use of nuclear substances, like radiation, to diagnose and treat certain illnesses.
    These specialists perform diagnostic tests in which a small amount of a radioactive substance is injected into a vein, inhaled or taken orally by the patient. The radioactive substance then enables the nuclear medicine specialist to use a scanner to detect the radiation level in the part of the body being examined in order to create an image of it with a computer. The images tell the physician whether there are abnormal changes in metabolism which indicate whether a disease or injury is present. These tests are often used to detect cancer.
    In addition to detecting cancer, substances like radioactive iodine can be either injected into the blood stream or taken orally to fight cancer and other diseases. After being ingested, the substance is absorbed by the thyroid gland and abnormal thyroid tissues are destroyed.

  • Pediatric Radiology

    Pediatric radiologists specialize in using x-rays, MRIs, CT scans and ultrasounds to help provide the most accurate diagnosis to your child as possible. After they receive the image results, they work with your family physician or other specialist to give him or her a closer look at broken bones from an accident or recognize tumors, bleeding and infections that might be causing certain symptoms.
    They focus on children as young as newborns and as old as teenagers and they have to be well-versed in the growth and development of children's bodies. This allows them to properly identify abnormalities at various ages and to work with your doctor on recommending the best treatment options.

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    An endocrinologist is a physician with extensive training in understanding, diagnosing and treating conditions related to the endocrine system. The endocrine system regulates the balance of hormones.
    Conditions of the endocrine system involve an over-abundance, or deficiency of a certain hormone. While there is a range when it comes to the amount of a hormone that is deemed normal in a human, these specialists determine whether a person's amount of hormone is indicative of a health concern. Two conditions this specialist might treat are diabetes and obesity.

  • Pediatric Hematology and Oncology

    Pediatric Hematologist-Oncologist

Ratings & Comments

599 ratings with 158 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Uc Davis Medical Group when asked is excellent. Uc Davis Medical Group has been reviewed by 599 patients. The rating is 4.1 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Uc Davis Medical Group as provided by patient reviews is 17 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • University Of California Davis School Of Medicine
  • University Of California Los Angeles David Geffen School Of Medicine
  • Washington University In St Louis School Of Medicine
  • University Of California Irvine School Of Medicine
  • University Of Nevada School Of Medicine
  • University Of Michigan Medical School
  • University Of Wisconsin School Of Medicine And Public Health
  • Keck School Of Medicine Of The University Of Southern California
  • University Of California San Francisco School Of Medicine
  • University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine
  • University Of Illinois College Of Medicine
  • Mount Sinai School Of Medicine Of New York University
  • University Of The Philippines
  • Western University Of Health Sciences
  • Tufts University School Of Medicine
  • Meharry Medical College
  • University Of New Mexico School Of Medicine
  • University Of North Texas Health Science Center College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • University Of Mississippi School Of Medicine
  • University Of Virginia School Of Medicine
  • Wayne State University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Southern California The Herman Ostrow School Of Dentistry
  • Mcgill University
  • University Of Arizona College Of Medicine
  • Pennsylvania State University College Of Medicine
  • Virginia Commonwealth University School Of Medicine
  • Lady Hardinge Medical College
  • Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • University Of Minnesota Medical School
  • Wake Forest University School Of Medicine
  • Michigan State University College Of Human Medicine
  • University Of California At San Francisco School Of Dentistry
  • Medical College Of Wisconsin
  • Baylor College Of Medicine
  • The University Of Texas School Of Medicine At San Antonio
  • Boston University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Washington School Of Medicine
  • Loma Linda University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Chicago Division Of The Biological Sciences The Pritzker School Of Medicine
  • University Of Arkansas For Medical Sciences College Of Medicine
  • Ohio State University College Of Medicine
  • University Of Medicine And Dentistry Of New Jersey
  • University Of Texas Medical Branch School Of Medicine
  • Harvard Medical School
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine
  • Georgetown University School Of Medicine
  • Oregon Health & Science University School Of Medicine
  • Saint Louis University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Maryland School Of Medicine
  • Aga Khan Medical College
  • Columbia University College Of Physicians And Surgeons
  • Oklahoma State University College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Albany Medical College
  • University At Buffalo State University Of New York School Of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences
  • University Of Texas Southwestern Medical School
  • The Warren Alpert Medical School Of Brown University
  • Taipei Medical University
  • University Of Kansas School Of Medicine
  • Emory University School Of Medicine
  • New York Medical College
  • University Of California San Diego School Of Medicine
  • Chulalongkorn University
  • Northwestern University The Feinberg School Of Medicine
  • Tulane University School Of Medicine
  • Uniformed Services University Of The Health Sciences F Edward Hebert School Of Medicine
  • Tehran University Of Medical Sciences
  • University Of Hawaii John A Burns School Of Medicine
  • Johns Hopkins University School Of Medicine
  • George Washington University School Of Medicine And Health Sciences
  • Universidad De Buenos Aires
  • Nearby Group Practices

    Uc Davis Medical Group is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near Sacramento, CA.

  • Ucd Family & Community Medcn.

    Group Practice

    Sacramento, CA

  • Ucdhs/Fmly. & Cmnty. Medcn. Acc

    Group Practice

    Sacramento, CA

  • Ambulatory Care Center

    Group Practice

    Sacramento, CA

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.