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Quick Facts

  • Accepted Insurance

  • Premera
  • United Healthcare
  • First Health
  • BCBS Blue Card

Specialties

3 specialties

  • Radiology

    A radiologist is a physician who specializes in the use of medical imaging to diagnose and treat illnesses or injuries in patients.
    The different types of medical imaging are X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and nuclear medicine.
    Radiologists are experts in these different types of tests and can advise a primary care doctor on which test is most appropriate in a specific case. These doctors also assist primary care doctors in analyzing the images produced by these tests in order to determine next steps necessary for treatment.

  • Neuroradiology

    Neuroradiologists focus specifically on diagnosing conditions related to the nervous system, spine, head and neck through radiology. They can identify abnormalities in these areas and help doctors properly diagnose the presence of tumors, aneurysms and even dementia.
    It’s also common for them to consult with patients with persistent headaches or back pains, trauma to a certain area, or any issue that can affect brain function, such as a stroke. Like any radiologist, they are trained to perform x-rays, cat scans, ultrasounds and MRIs, but they work closely with neurologists and neurosurgeons.

  • Pulmonary Critical Care Medicine

    If you or a family member go to the hospital because of a severe reaction due to asthma, emphysema, lung cancer or pneumonia, you’ll likely be treated by a pulmonary critical care specialist. They’re experienced pulmonologists who have additional training in caring for patients who are critically ill due to lung disease, breathing disorders or other chronic respiratory conditions.
    They work in hospitals and intensive care units instead of offices or clinics, which means they are equipped to handle emergency situations and provide intensive care and constant monitoring. Because they deal with chronic conditions, they are also well-versed in things like end-of-life decisions and how to coach family members through a difficult time.

Ratings & Comments

0 ratings

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Vmc when asked is poor. Vmc has been reviewed by 0 patients. The rating is out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Vmc as provided by patient reviews is unknown. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Boston University School Of Medicine
  • University Of California Davis School Of Medicine
  • Nearby Group Practices

    Vmc is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near San Jose, CA.

  • Departmemt of Ob./Gyn.

    Group Practice

    San Jose, CA

  • Internal Medicine Clinic

    Group Practice

    San Jose, CA

  • Ob. Gyn. Clinic

    Group Practice

    San Jose, CA

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.