Quick Facts

  • Accepted Insurance

  • United Healthcare
  • Aetna
  • Humana
  • Cigna
  • BCBS Blue Card

Specialties

12 specialties

  • Orthopedic Surgery

    An orthopaedic surgeon is a physician who specializes in diagnosis and surgical treatment of injuries and disorders involving the musculoskeletal system, such as hip replacements and arthroscopic knee surgery.
    In addition to treating trauma to the musculoskeletal system, these doctors also deal with sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

  • Orthopedics Reconstructive Surgery

    Orthopedic reconstructive surgeons deal with injuries and deformities of your bones and muscles. If you ever need a hip, knee or shoulder replacement — whether due to a sports injury or aging — an orthopedic surgeon will consult with you and answer any questions you have before scheduling an operation. After surgery, you’ll have a few checkups to ensure everything heals properly.
    In addition to shoulders, hips and knees, they deal with injuries everywhere from your ankles and feet to your elbows and hands — and even your spine. They also help treat birth defects related to bones and muscles as well as degenerative conditions like osteoporosis and muscular dystrophy.

  • Trauma Surgery

    Trauma surgeons treat patients who come to emergency rooms and require surgery after any kind of accident. They know how to act quickly, assess the patient’s condition, and decide on a course of action. They work fast to coordinate with other physicians and specialists in the hospital if needed, such as neurosurgeons and radiologists, so they can properly diagnose the injury and stabilize patients.
    Common trauma injuries include bleeding, burns, brain or other internal injuries, shock and loss of limbs. Because they treat patients in traumatic situations, they’re also typically skilled in offering some level of emotional support to help the patient cope with confusion and grief that may result from their accident.

  • Sports Medicine

    A sports medicine specialist is a physician who is trained to diagnose and treat injuries and conditions caused by participation in athletic activities.
    These doctors are generally employed by professional sports teams to care for the athletes who are injured. They have extensive knowledge of the types of injuries that athletes are most susceptible to, such as stress fractures, sprains, concussions, muscle cramps, ACL injuries, and shin splints.
    It is the responsibility of sports medicine specialist to clear athletes to return to the playing field when they are deemed fit. These doctors also advise athletes on how to avoid injury through proper care of their bodies while training.

  • Foot and Ankle Orthopedics

    An orthopedic foot and ankle surgeon can consult and operate on injuries and issues that may affect the bones, muscles, tendons, cartilage, ligaments and joints in your foot and ankle. Arthritis, bunions and flat feet are just a few of the issues that a foot and ankle surgeon might help you with.
    Any kind of reconstructive surgery or surgery needed to treat a sports-related injury would also land you in the care of a foot and ankle surgeon. However, beyond surgery, they can also offer other treatment options such as physical therapy and rehabilitation.

  • Surgery of the Hand

    Hand surgeons are certified surgeons who are also experts in the function and structure of your wrists, hands and forearms. This allows them to treat arthritis, carpal tunnel, trigger finger and tennis elbow, most of which tend to result from repetitive and excessive use of the corresponding joints, muscles, tendons and ligaments.
    Hand surgeons also commonly work with patients who have fractures or broken bones from any kind of accident. If you're experiencing any kind of general pain in your hand, wrist or forearm that isn’t going away, a hand surgeon is probably your best resource.

  • Orthopedic Surgery of the Spine

    If you have a back injury or unexplained back pain, your doctor might refer you first to a radiologist and then to an orthopedic spinal surgeon. They specialize in the spine and can diagnose and treat spinal diseases such as scoliosis. They can also treat spinal injuries such as a displaced disc or a fracture, as well as disc degeneration and narrowing that occurs due to aging.
    However, when your injury or condition affects the spinal canal or spinal cord, it’s typically better to consult with a neurosurgeon. It's worth noting that, while they're both referred to as surgeons, they can also recommend treatments that don't require an operation, such as non-surgical decompression therapy.

  • Pain Management

    A pain management specialist is a physician with advanced knowledge and training in diagnosing and treating pain. These doctors do not come from one particular discipline, but rather use their respective backgrounds to contribute a varied approach to the field of pain management.
    These specialists use their different skills and training in pain management to treat pain stemming from different causes - whether it's neuropathic pain or headache, or the result of injury, a surgical procedure, cancer or another illness.
    Pain management specialists are primarily trained as anesthesiologists, physiatrists, interventional radiologists, neurologists, osteopaths, or primary care physicians.

  • Family Medicine

    A family practitioner is a doctor who specializes in caring for people of all ages, at all stages of life. Rather than focusing on the treatment of one disease or patient population, family practitioners are often the doctors that people see for their everyday ailments, like cold and flu or respiratory infections, and health screenings. When necessary, family practitioners will provide referrals for conditions that require the expertise of another specialist.
    The doctors may also provide physicals, inoculations, prenatal care, treat chronic diseases, like diabetes and asthma, and provide advice on disease prevention.

  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    A physiatrist is a doctor who specializes in the rehabilitation and physiological treatment of patients with an illness or injury that affects movement.
    These specialists have extensive knowledge of the nerves, muscles, bone, and brain. Physiatrists are also experts in pain medication.
    Some common conditions that physiatrists treat are rheumatoid arthritis, neurological and spinal disorders and injuries, chronic pain disorders, like fibromyalgia, and musculoskeletal issues, like broken bones and torn muscles.
    These physicians also often coordinate a team of other specialists in order to maximize the patient's recovery, such as occupational therapists, speech therapists, neurologists, orthopedists, and counselors.

  • Plastic Surgery

    A plastic surgery specialist is a physician with extensive training in the execution of plastic surgery procedures.
    Plastic surgery is the use of surgical procedures to rebuild or reshape injured or misshapen body parts. Congenital defects, such as a cleft lip or palate, can be corrected by a plastic surgery specialist. Injuries sustained during auto accidents also may require the services of a plastic surgery specialist. These procedures fall under the category of reconstructive plastic surgery.
    The other category of plastic surgery is cosmetic plastic surgery. Plastic surgery specialists often perform procedures like breast augmentation, face lifts, tummy tucks, liposuction, and lip injection as elective surgeries for patients who wish to make aesthetic improvements.

  • Anesthesiology

    Anesthesiologists are physicians who are trained to administer anesthetics, which are medicines used to block nerve sensation. Anesthesia can be either local to one specific part of a body, like a tooth, or regional to block feeling to a larger portion of the body, such as during an epidural for child birth. It can also be more general to block sensation to the entire body, resulting in unconsciousness.
    Anesthesiologists assist in surgery by determining how much anesthesia is necessary and by monitoring the patient's level of responsiveness and vital signs throughout the procedure. The anesthesia specialist will also bring the patient out of anesthesia and then continue to monitor his or her vital signs post-operation.
    Besides assisting in surgeries, anesthesiologists may also treat patients suffering from chronic pain.

Ratings & Comments

1261 ratings with 509 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Florida Orthopaedic Institute when asked is excellent. Florida Orthopaedic Institute has been reviewed by 1261 patients. The rating is 4.1 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Florida Orthopaedic Institute as provided by patient reviews is 21 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • University Of South Florida College Of Medicine
  • Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Rush Medical College Of Rush University Medical Center
  • University Of Nebraska College Of Medicine
  • Ohio State University College Of Medicine
  • Creighton University School Of Medicine
  • The University Of Texas School Of Medicine At San Antonio
  • University Of Pittsburgh School Of Medicine
  • Pennsylvania State University College Of Medicine
  • Kansas City University Of Medicine And Biosciences
  • New York University School Of Medicine
  • Loyola University Chicago Stritch School Of Medicine
  • University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine
  • Yale University School Of Medicine
  • Nova Southeastern University
  • Nova Southeastern University College Of Dental Medicine
  • Case Western Reserve University School Of Medicine
  • Oklahoma State University College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Georgetown University School Of Medicine
  • Louisiana State University School Of Medicine In Shreveport
  • Wayne State University School Of Medicine
  • Heinrich Heine University Dusseldorf
  • University Of New England College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Meharry Medical College
  • Drexel University College Of Medicine
  • University Of British Columbia
  • Philadelphia College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Keck School Of Medicine Of The University Of Southern California
  • University Of Louisville School Of Medicine
  • Boston University School Of Medicine
  • New York College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Michigan State University College Of Human Medicine
  • Dalhousie University Faculty Of Medicine
  • University Of Medicine And Dentistry Of New Jersey Robert Wood Johnson Medical School
  • University Of The Witwatersrand
  • Northwestern University The Feinberg School Of Medicine
  • University Of Maryland School Of Medicine
  • University Of Tennessee Health Science Center College Of Medicine
  • Loma Linda University School Of Medicine
  • Nearby Group Practices

    Florida Orthopaedic Institute is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near Temple Terrace, FL.

  • Tampa Bay Physicians Emergency

    Group Practice

    Temple Terrace, FL

  • Tampa Bay Radiology Consultant

    Group Practice

    Temple Terrace, FL

  • Pediatric Gastroenterology Hepatology & Nutrition Of Fl

    Group Practice

    Temple Terrace, FL

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.