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Quick Facts

  • Accepted Insurance

  • Humana
  • United Healthcare
  • BCBS Blue Card
  • Cigna
  • Multiplan

Specialties

21 specialties

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Pediatrics

    A pediatrician is a doctor who specializes in the regular care of children, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of illness in children. Young patients are often more complicated to treat because they are still growing and developing.
    While pediatricians may sub-specialize in specific therapy areas like oncology, surgery, ophthalmology, and anesthesiology, in general, pediatricians provide services like vaccinations, health exams, and treatment of common ailments and injuries. In addition, pediatricians are trained to handle the complex emotional and behavioral issues faced by children, especially during puberty.
    Pediatricians normally see their patients from birth until the age of 18, although some may agree to treat patients into their early 20s, if requested.

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

    An obstetrician & gynecologist, or OB/GYN, is a physician who cares for women throughout their pregnancies, straight through to the delivery of their baby (obstetrician). They also specialize in annual care, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the female reproductive system (gynecologist). Many physicians specialize in both of these fields in order to provide complete overall health services to women at every stage of life.

  • General Surgery

    A surgical specialist is a physician who has additional training in a specific area of surgery.
    The American Board of Medical Specialties acknowledges the following surgical specialties: general surgery, thoracic and cardiac surgery, colon and rectal surgery, obstetrics and gynecological surgery, neurological surgery, ophthalmic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngological surgery, pediatric surgery, plastic surgery, urological surgery, and vascular surgery.
    Some procedures are performed by more than one type of specialist. Also, some surgeons may choose to specialize in specific procedures within their specialty area. For example, a plastic and maxillofacial surgeon may specialize in performing rhinoplasty procedures.

  • Hospitalist

    Hospitalists are physicians who specialize in the care of patients in the hospital. The majority of hospitalists are board-certified internists and have completed the same training as other internal medicine doctors including medical school, residency and board certification examination.
    Hospitalist activities include patient care, teaching, research, and leadership related to hospital care. They have more expertise in caring for complicated hospitalized patients on a daily basis since, unlike other specialists or primary care doctors, they spend most of their day in the hospital.
    They often coordinate the care of their patients and act as the central point of communication among the different doctors and nurses involved in the patient's care. They are also the main physician for family members to contact for updates on a loved one.

  • Hematology and Oncology

    An Oncologist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of different cancers. This physician has extensive knowledge of the different signs and symptoms of cancer, as well as the various methods of treatment.
    Oncologists diagnose cancer through methods such as biopsy, endoscopy, X-ray, blood tests, ultrasound, and different forms of nuclear medicine. They treat cancer through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormone therapy, or antibody treatments.
    If it is determined that a cancer cannot successfully be treated, oncologists then focus on providing palliative care, the use of pain medication to make a dying person more comfortable.

  • Orthopedic Surgery

    An orthopaedic surgeon is a physician who specializes in diagnosis and surgical treatment of injuries and disorders involving the musculoskeletal system, such as hip replacements and arthroscopic knee surgery.
    In addition to treating trauma to the musculoskeletal system, these doctors also deal with sports injuries, degenerative diseases, infections, tumors and congenital disorders.

  • Gynecology
  • Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine

    The main responsibility of a perinatologists, also known as a maternal-fetal medicine specialist, is to treat, monitor and assist pregnant mothers through high-risk pregnancies. This includes high blood pressure, early labor and bleeding. They’re also able to identify birth defects and then recommend necessary treatments to support your baby before he/she is born.
    Other reasons you may need to see a perinatologist during your pregnancy include diabetes, problems with a previous pregnancy or carrying twins. Having completed OB-GYN training, they’re experts on the female reproductive system with additional specialized training in un-routine pregnancies. So, whether you know you’re at risk going into your pregnancy or problems arise unexpectedly, perinatologists can help you.

  • Neurological Surgery

    A neurological surgeon is a physician who surgically treats disorders of the nervous system, which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves.
    In addition to treating trauma of the head and spine, these doctors also treat disorders like epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    Neurological surgeons can perform surgical procedures on the brain, such as stereotactic surgery, microsurgery, endoscopic surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and endovascular image guided methods.

  • Legal Medicine

    Legal medicine specialists advise on a variety of laws and regulations regarding health care and public health. This include disability claims, hospital law, privacy laws and physicians’ obligations and liabilities. They typically have a medical degree and a law degree so they're able to address specific legal issues that apply to medical professionals, hospitals and clinics.
    Compared to forensic medicine, which deals with determining cause of death in criminal investigations, they deal with issues that impact patient care and they’re also typically involved in assessing illegal substance use in athletes.

  • Vascular Surgery

    Vascular surgeons treat and manage disorders in your veins, arteries and your lymphatic system to ensure blood circulation in your heart and in brain is the best it can be. They're well-versed on how your vascular system works with the rest of your body and they can treat conditions that may cause blockages or buildup.
    They can perform many of the same diagnostic testing as interventional radiologists can, such as angiography and MRIs. In addition to diagnosis, they provide critical care and treatment for aneurysms, artery blockages and trauma injuries that involve your veins. They can also help patients manage diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as treat artery disease. Treatment for more serious cases might include bypass surgery or surgery to remove plaque.

  • Medical Oncology

    Think of an oncologist as your main physician for cancer care. After being diagnosed, you’ll meet regularly with an oncologist to explore and manage your treatment options, as well as monitor your condition throughout the process. Medical oncologists are extremely knowledgeable in various types of cancer treatment and can recommend the right method for the type and stage of cancer you’re facing.
    They may also refer you to additional specialists throughout your care, but they will always be your home base for questions and support. It’s also worth mentioning that medical oncologists deal mostly with solid tumors while hematologists specialize in cancers that involve blood disorders, such as leukemia.

  • Family Medicine

    A family practitioner is a doctor who specializes in caring for people of all ages, at all stages of life. Rather than focusing on the treatment of one disease or patient population, family practitioners are often the doctors that people see for their everyday ailments, like cold and flu or respiratory infections, and health screenings. When necessary, family practitioners will provide referrals for conditions that require the expertise of another specialist.
    The doctors may also provide physicals, inoculations, prenatal care, treat chronic diseases, like diabetes and asthma, and provide advice on disease prevention.

  • Neurology

    A neurologist is a physician who diagnoses and treats disorders of the nervous system which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves. These doctors do not perform surgery, but refer patients to neurological surgeons when they determine that surgical intervention is necessary.
    Some of the conditions that neurologists diagnose and treat are epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    In addition to using diagnostic tests like MRI, CT scans, EEG and EMG, neurologists also employ neurological testing to gauge muscle strength and movement, balance, reflexes, sensation, memory, speech, and other cognitive abilities.

  • General Practice

    A general practitioner is similar to a family practitioner in that they treat patients of all ages with a variety of health concerns. These doctors treat everyday ailments, some acute and chronic diseases, and also provid health checkups, physicals, inoculations and preventative care.
    General practitioners differ from family practitioners because they are not required to complete an additional residency in family medicine after completing their medical school residency. Like family practitioners, general practitioners will also provide referrals to patients who are in need of a specialist.

  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    A physiatrist is a doctor who specializes in the rehabilitation and physiological treatment of patients with an illness or injury that affects movement.
    These specialists have extensive knowledge of the nerves, muscles, bone, and brain. Physiatrists are also experts in pain medication.
    Some common conditions that physiatrists treat are rheumatoid arthritis, neurological and spinal disorders and injuries, chronic pain disorders, like fibromyalgia, and musculoskeletal issues, like broken bones and torn muscles.
    These physicians also often coordinate a team of other specialists in order to maximize the patient's recovery, such as occupational therapists, speech therapists, neurologists, orthopedists, and counselors.

  • Bariatric Medicine

    Bariatric medicine focuses on the causes, prevention and treatment of obesity. Bariatric specialists are trained in medically supervised weight loss and the management of obesity as a chronic condition. These specialists are skilled in various disciplines that help patients lose weight and obtain optimal health.
    The field encompasses dieting, exercise and behavioral therapy, anti-obesity medication, pharmacotherapy and surgery. Bariatric specialists might be from surgical backgrounds and perform obesity-related operations or they might be nutrition and hormone focused, prescribing diet and exercise plans as well as weight loss medications.
    Patients defined as obese or having unhealthy Body Mass Indices (BMI) have much greater risk of heart disease, diabetes, asthma, sleep apnea, hypertension, many types of cancer and chronic musculoskeletal problems.
    One subspecialty of bariatrics is the focus on the correlation between obesity and mortality.

  • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
  • Pathology

    A pathologist is a physician who specializes in the causes and paths taken by different diseases in order to accurately diagnose an illness.
    Pathologists diagnose and determine the characteristics of a disease through the study of biopsies of diseased tissue or of bodily fluids. For example, a pathologist will look at a biopsy of a skin lesion in order to diagnose or rule out skin cancer. A pathologist will also look at a Pap smear in order to check for a gynecological cancer like cancer of the uterus.
    In addition to determining the cause and development of a disease, these specialists also study the changes a disease makes to a body and the consequences of those structural changes.

  • Obstetrics

Ratings & Comments

567 ratings with 169 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of The Longstreet Clinic when asked is excellent. The Longstreet Clinic has been reviewed by 567 patients. The rating is 4.1 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at The Longstreet Clinic as provided by patient reviews is 19 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Medical College Of Georgia School Of Medicine
  • Emory University School Of Medicine
  • Tulane University School Of Medicine
  • Duke University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Cincinnati College Of Medicine
  • Mercer University School Of Medicine
  • The University Of Texas School Of Medicine At San Antonio
  • Indiana University School Of Medicine
  • Jefferson Medical College Of Thomas Jefferson University
  • University Of Tennessee Health Science Center College Of Medicine
  • University At Buffalo State University Of New York School Of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences
  • University Of Mississippi School Of Medicine
  • University Of Virginia School Of Medicine
  • Medical University Of South Carolina College Of Medicine
  • New York Medical College
  • Eastern Virginia Medical School
  • University Of Maryland School Of Medicine
  • University Of Florida College Of Medicine
  • Louisiana State University School Of Medicine In New Orleans
  • University Of Khartoum
  • University Of South Carolina School Of Medicine
  • Albert Einstein College Of Medicine
  • Vanderbilt University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Rochester School Of Medicine And Dentistry
  • Fatima Jinnah Medical College For Women
  • Nearby Group Practices

    The Longstreet Clinic is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near Gainesville, GA.

  • The Longstreet Clinic -Department Of Pediatrics

    Group Practice

    Gainesville, GA

  • Northeast Georgia Cancer Care Llc

    Group Practice

    Gainesville, GA

  • Gainesville Regional Pathology

    Group Practice

    Gainesville, GA

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.