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Quick Facts

  • Accepted Insurance

  • Cigna
  • Humana
  • United Healthcare
  • Aetna
  • Multiplan

Doctors by Specialty

Select a specialty below to filter by doctors affiliated at Vanderbilt Heart Inst

  • Doctors Specializing in Cardiology

  • Dr. Joseph Fredi MD Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine, Cardiology, Interventional Cardiology Franklin, KY
    4.9 (24)
  • Dr. Henry Jennings III MD Cardiovascular Disease, Interventional Cardiology, Cardiology, Internal Medicine Nashville, TN
    4.8 (8)

Specialties

12 specialties

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Vascular Surgery

    Vascular surgeons treat and manage disorders in your veins, arteries and your lymphatic system to ensure blood circulation in your heart and in brain is the best it can be. They're well-versed on how your vascular system works with the rest of your body and they can treat conditions that may cause blockages or buildup.
    They can perform many of the same diagnostic testing as interventional radiologists can, such as angiography and MRIs. In addition to diagnosis, they provide critical care and treatment for aneurysms, artery blockages and trauma injuries that involve your veins. They can also help patients manage diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as treat artery disease. Treatment for more serious cases might include bypass surgery or surgery to remove plaque.

  • Interventional Cardiology

    An interventional cardiologist has the same training as a cardiologist and they're well-versed in all types of heart disease and how to diagnose heart problems. The difference is that interventional cardiologists have additional expertise and training on specific interventional treatments for heart disease, such as angioplasties and stents. These methods use catheterization, which reduces recovery time as well as scarring after surgery.

  • Urology

    A urologist is a physician who specializes in diagnosing and treating conditions affecting the male reproductive system, as well as the urinary tracts of both males and females.
    These doctors cover the kidneys, ureter, urinary bladder, adrenal glands, urethra, and the male reproductive organs which include the testes, epididymis, vas deferens, seminal vesicles, prostate and penis. Some common disorders that urologists treat are urinary tract infections (UTI), stress incontinence, benign prostatic hyperplasia, kidney stones, erectile dysfunction, kidney cancer, prostate cancer, testicular cancer, and cystitis. These urological specialists also perform vasectomies and vasectomy reversals.

  • General Surgery

    A surgical specialist is a physician who has additional training in a specific area of surgery.
    The American Board of Medical Specialties acknowledges the following surgical specialties: general surgery, thoracic and cardiac surgery, colon and rectal surgery, obstetrics and gynecological surgery, neurological surgery, ophthalmic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngological surgery, pediatric surgery, plastic surgery, urological surgery, and vascular surgery.
    Some procedures are performed by more than one type of specialist. Also, some surgeons may choose to specialize in specific procedures within their specialty area. For example, a plastic and maxillofacial surgeon may specialize in performing rhinoplasty procedures.

  • Sports Medicine

    A sports medicine specialist is a physician who is trained to diagnose and treat injuries and conditions caused by participation in athletic activities.
    These doctors are generally employed by professional sports teams to care for the athletes who are injured. They have extensive knowledge of the types of injuries that athletes are most susceptible to, such as stress fractures, sprains, concussions, muscle cramps, ACL injuries, and shin splints.
    It is the responsibility of sports medicine specialist to clear athletes to return to the playing field when they are deemed fit. These doctors also advise athletes on how to avoid injury through proper care of their bodies while training.

  • Ophthalmology

    An ophthalmologist has the training to do much more than just prescribe glasses. They are physicians specially trained to diagnose and treat disorders of the eyes and vision. These doctors are experts on the complicated anatomy of the eye and are trained to treat eye diseases through both medical and surgical methods.
    Some common conditions that ophthalmologists treat are cataracts, glaucoma, strabismus, diabetic retinopathy, macular degeneration and amblyopia. In addition, ophthalmologists can provide prescriptions for eye glasses and contact lenses and perform LASIK surgery and other corrective surgeries for refractive errors like myopia (near-sightedness), hyperopia (far-sightedness), astigmatism and presbyopia.

  • Thoracic Surgery

    If you need surgery to treat a complication in your chest, which includes your lungs, esophagus, diaphragm and heart, your doctor will refer you to a thoracic surgeon. They’re trained to offer surgical treatment for tumors and abnormalities in these areas as well as respiratory and heart conditions like lung cancer, heart disease and diseases in the diaphragm.
    Thoracic surgeons are similar to heart surgeons, except they have additional training in the entire cardiorespiratory system and in how your blood vessels work with your lungs and airways. They’re also trained on catheters used in the chest, as well as cardiac and respiratory support systems that might be part of your treatment plan.

  • Family Medicine

    A family practitioner is a doctor who specializes in caring for people of all ages, at all stages of life. Rather than focusing on the treatment of one disease or patient population, family practitioners are often the doctors that people see for their everyday ailments, like cold and flu or respiratory infections, and health screenings. When necessary, family practitioners will provide referrals for conditions that require the expertise of another specialist.
    The doctors may also provide physicals, inoculations, prenatal care, treat chronic diseases, like diabetes and asthma, and provide advice on disease prevention.

  • Neurology

    A neurologist is a physician who diagnoses and treats disorders of the nervous system which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves. These doctors do not perform surgery, but refer patients to neurological surgeons when they determine that surgical intervention is necessary.
    Some of the conditions that neurologists diagnose and treat are epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    In addition to using diagnostic tests like MRI, CT scans, EEG and EMG, neurologists also employ neurological testing to gauge muscle strength and movement, balance, reflexes, sensation, memory, speech, and other cognitive abilities.

  • Neurological Surgery

    A neurological surgeon is a physician who surgically treats disorders of the nervous system, which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves.
    In addition to treating trauma of the head and spine, these doctors also treat disorders like epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    Neurological surgeons can perform surgical procedures on the brain, such as stereotactic surgery, microsurgery, endoscopic surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and endovascular image guided methods.

Ratings & Comments

130 ratings with 32 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Vanderbilt Heart Inst when asked is excellent. Vanderbilt Heart Inst has been reviewed by 130 patients. The rating is 4.3 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Vanderbilt Heart Inst as provided by patient reviews is 22 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Vanderbilt University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Tennessee Health Science Center College Of Medicine
  • Ohio State University College Of Medicine
  • Boston University School Of Medicine
  • University Of Minnesota Medical School
  • Baylor College Of Medicine
  • West Virginia University School Of Medicine
  • Northwestern University The Feinberg School Of Medicine
  • Univerzita Komenskeho
  • University Of Virginia School Of Medicine
  • Medical College Of Georgia School Of Medicine
  • University Of Pennsylvania School Of Medicine
  • University Of Mississippi School Of Medicine
  • Harvard Medical School
  • Nearby Group Practices

    Vanderbilt Heart Inst is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near Nashville, TN.

  • Vanderbilt Emergency Medicine Res. Prgr

    Group Practice

    Nashville, TN

  • Oxford House

    Group Practice

    Nashville, TN

  • South Medical Arts BDLG

    Group Practice

    Nashville, TN

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.