Quick Facts

  • Awards

    1 Awards

  • Patients' Choice Award
  • Accepted Insurance

  • BCBS Blue Card
  • United Healthcare
  • Cigna
  • Coventry Health Care
  • BCBS Illinois

Doctors in Team Health Radiology

View all physicians that belong to Team Health Radiology.

Ratings & Comments

32 ratings with 6 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Team Health Radiology when asked is good. Team Health Radiology has been reviewed by 32 patients. The rating is 3.4 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Team Health Radiology as provided by patient reviews is 31 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

Specialties

8 specialties

  • Emergency Medicine

    An emergency physician is a doctor who is an expert in handling conditions of an urgent and extremely dangerous nature. These specialists work in the emergency room (ER) departments of hospitals where they oversee cases involving cardiac distress, trauma, fractures, lacerations and other acute conditions.
    Emergency physicians are specially trained to make urgent life-saving decisions to treat patients during an emergency medical crisis. These doctors diagnose and stabilize patients before they are either well enough to be discharged, or transferred to the appropriate department for long-term care.

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Diagnostic Radiology

    Radiologists help doctors get a closer look at what’s happening inside your body. If your primary care doctor wants to investigate your symptoms further, they may refer you to a radiologist to get an ultrasound or x-ray. Some radiologists specialize in mammography and breast imaging, which is who you see when you need a mammogram. A Radiologist can also determine if bones are broken or fractured after any kind of accident.
    Radiologists are trained to perform MRIs and CT scans, both of which are used to determine the presence of diseases or disorders and help your doctor properly diagnose you. They can detect anything from tumors, bleeding and infections to bone and muscle disorders.

  • Radiology

    A radiologist is a physician who specializes in the use of medical imaging to diagnose and treat illnesses or injuries in patients.
    The different types of medical imaging are X-ray, computed tomography (CT) scans, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasound, and nuclear medicine.
    Radiologists are experts in these different types of tests and can advise a primary care doctor on which test is most appropriate in a specific case. These doctors also assist primary care doctors in analyzing the images produced by these tests in order to determine next steps necessary for treatment.

  • Pediatric Emergency Medicine

    If your child ever becomes unstable and you rush to the hospital, a pediatric emergency medicine specialist will work to quickly diagnose the condition, start treatment and then continue to monitor symptoms until he/she is stable again. They are pediatricians specifically trained to handle medical emergencies and make quick decisions to treat infants and children.
    They have experience treating allergic reactions, poisonings, trauma injuries from accidents and complications that arise from any chronic illnesses, congenital conditions, asthma or diabetes. They can also diagnose the source of severe symptoms like fever, seizures and trouble breathing to get parents more answers.

  • Neuroradiology

    Neuroradiologists focus specifically on diagnosing conditions related to the nervous system, spine, head and neck through radiology. They can identify abnormalities in these areas and help doctors properly diagnose the presence of tumors, aneurysms and even dementia.
    It’s also common for them to consult with patients with persistent headaches or back pains, trauma to a certain area, or any issue that can affect brain function, such as a stroke. Like any radiologist, they are trained to perform x-rays, cat scans, ultrasounds and MRIs, but they work closely with neurologists and neurosurgeons.

  • Hematology and Oncology

    An Oncologist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of different cancers. This physician has extensive knowledge of the different signs and symptoms of cancer, as well as the various methods of treatment.
    Oncologists diagnose cancer through methods such as biopsy, endoscopy, X-ray, blood tests, ultrasound, and different forms of nuclear medicine. They treat cancer through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormone therapy, or antibody treatments.
    If it is determined that a cancer cannot successfully be treated, oncologists then focus on providing palliative care, the use of pain medication to make a dying person more comfortable.

  • Hospitalist

    Hospitalists are physicians who specialize in the care of patients in the hospital. The majority of hospitalists are board-certified internists and have completed the same training as other internal medicine doctors including medical school, residency and board certification examination.
    Hospitalist activities include patient care, teaching, research, and leadership related to hospital care. They have more expertise in caring for complicated hospitalized patients on a daily basis since, unlike other specialists or primary care doctors, they spend most of their day in the hospital.
    They often coordinate the care of their patients and act as the central point of communication among the different doctors and nurses involved in the patient's care. They are also the main physician for family members to contact for updates on a loved one.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Des Moines University
  • University Of Tennessee Health Science Center College Of Medicine
  • Nova Southeastern University
  • Arizona College Of Osteopathic Medicine Of Midwestern University
  • Ohio State University College Of Medicine
  • Universidad Autonoma De Guadalajara
  • University Of California Irvine School Of Medicine
  • University Of Alabama School Of Medicine
  • University Of Missouri Kansas City School Of Medicine
  • Nearby Group Practices

    Team Health Radiology is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near Knoxville, TN.

  • St. Francis Emergency Medicine

    Group Practice

    Knoxville, TN

  • Southeastern Internist Services

    Group Practice

    Knoxville, TN

  • Teamhealth Radiology Services

    Group Practice

    Knoxville, TN

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.