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Quick Facts

  • Awards

    3 Awards

  • Patient-Centered Medical Home Patient-Centered Medical Home
  • Physician Office Systems Recognition Program Physician Office Systems Recognition Program
  • Patients' Choice Award Patients' Choice Award
  • Accepted Insurance

  • BCBS Blue Card
  • United Healthcare
  • Aetna
  • Humana
  • Coventry Health Care

Doctors in Cardiovascular Center at Shands UF

View all physicians that belong to Cardiovascular Center at Shands UF.

Ratings & Comments

29 ratings with 12 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Cardiovascular Center at Shands UF when asked is excellent. Cardiovascular Center at Shands UF has been reviewed by 29 patients. The rating is 4.2 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Cardiovascular Center at Shands UF as provided by patient reviews is 20 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

Specialties

11 specialties

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Pulmonary Disease

    A pulmonologist is a physician who specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of conditions related to the lungs and respiratory tract.
    These specialists are similar to critical care specialists in that their patients often require mechanical ventilation to assist their breathing.
    Pulmonologists diagnose and treat patients with conditions such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, asbestosis, pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, COPD, and emphysema. Exposure and inhalation of certain toxic substances may also warrant the services of a pulmonologist.
    Some of the tools and tests pulmonologists use to diagnose a patient are a stethoscope in order to listen for abnormal breathing sounds, chest X-rays, CT scans, blood tests, bronchoscopy, and polysomnography.

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Critical Care Medicine

    Also sometimes referred to as intensivists, critical care specialists are physicians with specialized training in the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions. Some of these conditions affect vital organs like the heart and lungs, those that make breathing difficult or impossible, and those that affect entire organ systems, like the renal system.
    Critical care specialists are typically found in a hospital's intensive care unit where they monitor patients with life-threatening conditions and make determinations as to the best course of treatment.

  • General Surgery

    A surgical specialist is a physician who has additional training in a specific area of surgery.
    The American Board of Medical Specialties acknowledges the following surgical specialties: general surgery, thoracic and cardiac surgery, colon and rectal surgery, obstetrics and gynecological surgery, neurological surgery, ophthalmic surgery, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthopedic surgery, otolaryngological surgery, pediatric surgery, plastic surgery, urological surgery, and vascular surgery.
    Some procedures are performed by more than one type of specialist. Also, some surgeons may choose to specialize in specific procedures within their specialty area. For example, a plastic and maxillofacial surgeon may specialize in performing rhinoplasty procedures.

  • Thoracic Surgery

    If you need surgery to treat a complication in your chest, which includes your lungs, esophagus, diaphragm and heart, your doctor will refer you to a thoracic surgeon. They’re trained to offer surgical treatment for tumors and abnormalities in these areas as well as respiratory and heart conditions like lung cancer, heart disease and diseases in the diaphragm.
    Thoracic surgeons are similar to heart surgeons, except they have additional training in the entire cardiorespiratory system and in how your blood vessels work with your lungs and airways. They’re also trained on catheters used in the chest, as well as cardiac and respiratory support systems that might be part of your treatment plan.

  • Vascular Surgery

    Vascular surgeons treat and manage disorders in your veins, arteries and your lymphatic system to ensure blood circulation in your heart and in brain is the best it can be. They're well-versed on how your vascular system works with the rest of your body and they can treat conditions that may cause blockages or buildup.
    They can perform many of the same diagnostic testing as interventional radiologists can, such as angiography and MRIs. In addition to diagnosis, they provide critical care and treatment for aneurysms, artery blockages and trauma injuries that involve your veins. They can also help patients manage diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as treat artery disease. Treatment for more serious cases might include bypass surgery or surgery to remove plaque.

  • Interventional Cardiology

    An interventional cardiologist has the same training as a cardiologist and they're well-versed in all types of heart disease and how to diagnose heart problems. The difference is that interventional cardiologists have additional expertise and training on specific interventional treatments for heart disease, such as angioplasties and stents. These methods use catheterization, which reduces recovery time as well as scarring after surgery.

  • Infectious Disease

    An infectious disease specialist has specialized training in the diagnosis and treatment of contagious diseases.
    Infectious diseases, also known as contagious or transmissible diseases, are those that stem from pathogen from a host organism. These infections may spread to other carriers through physical touch, airborne inhalation, bodily fluids or contaminated foods.
    Infectious disease specialists identify whether the disease is caused by bacteria, a virus, a fungus or a parasite often through blood tests and then determine what course of treatment, if any, is necessary.

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

    An endocrinologist is a physician with extensive training in understanding, diagnosing and treating conditions related to the endocrine system. The endocrine system regulates the balance of hormones.
    Conditions of the endocrine system involve an over-abundance, or deficiency of a certain hormone. While there is a range when it comes to the amount of a hormone that is deemed normal in a human, these specialists determine whether a person's amount of hormone is indicative of a health concern. Two conditions this specialist might treat are diabetes and obesity.

  • Cardiology

    Cardiologists are doctors who specialize in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of conditions related to the heart and blood vessels.
    A patient may be referred to a cardiologist if he experiences symptoms like chest pains, shortness of breath, dizziness, or high blood pressure. The physician will then evaluate your symptoms, take your health and family history and your weight. The cardiologist may order additional diagnostic tests, such as an echocardiogram, X-ray or blood tests. If necessary, the cardiologist may also call for a cardiac catheterization - a procedure in which a small tube is inserted into or near the heart that can take pictures of the heart's activity, or relieve blockage.
    Once determining whether there is a heart condition, a cardiologist will treat a patient through cholesterol management, cardiac rehabilitation, and fitness. If surgical intervention is required, like open-heart surgery, a cardiologist will make that determination, but a cardiothoracic surgeon will perform the procedure.

  • Hospital Affiliations

    Cardiovascular Center at Shands UF is affiliated with the following hospitals

  • UF Health Shands Childrens Hospital Gainesville, FL 32610
  • Shands at AGH Gainesville, FL 32601
  • Shands at Lake Shore Lake City, FL 32055
  • Shands at Live Oak Gainesville, FL 32610
  • Shands at Starke Starke, FL 32091
  • Shands at Vista Gainesville, FL 32606
  • Shands Hospital at The Univ. of Florida Gainesville, FL 32610
  • Malcom Randall VA Medical Center Gainesville, FL 32608
  • James A Haley VA Medical Center Tampa, FL 33612
  • Doctors Medical Center Modesto, CA 95350
  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • University Of Florida College Of Medicine
  • New York University School Of Medicine
  • Kasturba Medical College Mangalore
  • University Of Massachusetts Medical School
  • Weill Cornell Medical College
  • University Of South Florida College Of Medicine
  • University Of Tennessee Health Science Center College Of Medicine
  • University Of Alberta Faculty Of Medicine And Dentistry
  • University At Buffalo State University Of New York School Of Medicine & Biomedical Sciences

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

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