Quick Facts

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease in which your body is unable to maintain a normal blood sugar (glucose) level.

  • Accepted Insurance

  • Aetna
  • Coventry Health Care

Doctors in Hope Hospice

View all physicians that belong to Hope Hospice.
  • Nearby Doctors

    There are no Doctors within 50 miles of Fort Myers, FL that specialze in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Family Medicine, Geriatric Medicine, Internal Medicine, Vascular Surgery, General Practice, Emergency Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics and Critical Care Medicine

  • search for Doctors

Ratings & Comments

13 ratings with 2 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Hope Hospice when asked is excellent. Hope Hospice has been reviewed by 13 patients. The rating is 3.9 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Hope Hospice as provided by patient reviews is 40 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

Location

get directions Hope Hospice
9470 Healthpark Cir
Fort Myers, FL 33908

Specialties

10 specialties

  • Pediatrics

    A pediatrician is a doctor who specializes in the regular care of children, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of illness in children. Young patients are often more complicated to treat because they are still growing and developing.
    While pediatricians may sub-specialize in specific therapy areas like oncology, surgery, ophthalmology, and anesthesiology, in general, pediatricians provide services like vaccinations, health exams, and treatment of common ailments and injuries. In addition, pediatricians are trained to handle the complex emotional and behavioral issues faced by children, especially during puberty.
    Pediatricians normally see their patients from birth until the age of 18, although some may agree to treat patients into their early 20s, if requested.

  • Emergency Medicine

    An emergency physician is a doctor who is an expert in handling conditions of an urgent and extremely dangerous nature. These specialists work in the emergency room (ER) departments of hospitals where they oversee cases involving cardiac distress, trauma, fractures, lacerations and other acute conditions.
    Emergency physicians are specially trained to make urgent life-saving decisions to treat patients during an emergency medical crisis. These doctors diagnose and stabilize patients before they are either well enough to be discharged, or transferred to the appropriate department for long-term care.

  • Critical Care Medicine

    Also sometimes referred to as intensivists, critical care specialists are physicians with specialized training in the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions. Some of these conditions affect vital organs like the heart and lungs, those that make breathing difficult or impossible, and those that affect entire organ systems, like the renal system.
    Critical care specialists are typically found in a hospital's intensive care unit where they monitor patients with life-threatening conditions and make determinations as to the best course of treatment.

  • Hospice and Palliative Medicine

    Hospice care & Palliative medicine specialists focus their practice on pain management, symptom relief and qualify-of-life treatments to relieve the suffering of terminally ill patients. These doctors have specialized expertise in the treatment of patients with serious illnesses, advanced diseases and conditions resulting from catastrophic injury. Though often they work within hospice settings, they prevent and alleviate suffering appropriate at any age and stage of disease and can work alongside practitioners providing curative treatments.
    Hospice care & Palliative medicine focuses on depression, pain, fatigue, constipation, nausea, shortness of breath, loss of appetite and difficulty sleeping, among other conditions. They also alleviate psychosocial distress and other stressors that accompany terminal illnesses. They are skilled in guiding families through legal and ethical decision-making in end-of-life care and can address spiritual issues at these times. By coordinating care across settings by improving communication among providers, they improve access to information for families so that they understand the patient's condition and treatment options.

  • General Practice

    A general practitioner is similar to a family practitioner in that they treat patients of all ages with a variety of health concerns. These doctors treat everyday ailments, some acute and chronic diseases, and also provid health checkups, physicals, inoculations and preventative care.
    General practitioners differ from family practitioners because they are not required to complete an additional residency in family medicine after completing their medical school residency. Like family practitioners, general practitioners will also provide referrals to patients who are in need of a specialist.

  • Geriatric Medicine

    A geriatric specialist is a physician who treats the elderly population and the conditions that most commonly affect them. These doctors have special training in the effects of aging on the body and mind of a patient.
    Geriatric specialists treat common ailments faced by senior citizens, such as frailty, incontinence, memory problems, arthritis, senility, decreased functioning and more.
    In addition, geriatric specialists keep abreast of the different medications that an elderly person is prescribed to treat their more complex health issues in order to decrease adverse side effects and avoid dangerous drug interactions.

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Vascular Surgery

    Vascular surgeons treat and manage disorders in your veins, arteries and your lymphatic system to ensure blood circulation in your heart and in brain is the best it can be. They're well-versed on how your vascular system works with the rest of your body and they can treat conditions that may cause blockages or buildup.
    They can perform many of the same diagnostic testing as interventional radiologists can, such as angiography and MRIs. In addition to diagnosis, they provide critical care and treatment for aneurysms, artery blockages and trauma injuries that involve your veins. They can also help patients manage diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as treat artery disease. Treatment for more serious cases might include bypass surgery or surgery to remove plaque.

  • Family Medicine

    A family practitioner is a doctor who specializes in caring for people of all ages, at all stages of life. Rather than focusing on the treatment of one disease or patient population, family practitioners are often the doctors that people see for their everyday ailments, like cold and flu or respiratory infections, and health screenings. When necessary, family practitioners will provide referrals for conditions that require the expertise of another specialist.
    The doctors may also provide physicals, inoculations, prenatal care, treat chronic diseases, like diabetes and asthma, and provide advice on disease prevention.

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

    An obstetrician & gynecologist, or OB/GYN, is a physician who cares for women throughout their pregnancies, straight through to the delivery of their baby (obstetrician). They also specialize in annual care, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the female reproductive system (gynecologist). Many physicians specialize in both of these fields in order to provide complete overall health services to women at every stage of life.

Doctors in Hope Hospice

  • Dr. Charles G Newton Jr MD

    Vascular Surgery, Hospice and Palliative Medicine

    Fort Myers, FL

    5.0
    (4)
  • Dr. Felicia A Stonedale MD

    Hospice and Palliative Medicine, General Practice, Emergency Medicine

    Fort Myers, FL

    5.0
    (2)
  • Dr. Felicia A Stonedale MD

    Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Emergency Medicine, General Practice

    Fort Myers, FL

    5.0
    (2)
  • Dr. Horace P Dansby MD

    Cardiovascular Disease, Internal Medicine

    Cape Coral, FL

    5.0
    (1)
  • Dr. Bakthavatsalam P Vardhini MD

    Geriatric Medicine, Internal Medicine, Hospice and Palliative Medicine

    Fort Myers, FL

    5.0
    (1)
  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Philadelphia College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Bj Medical College
  • Washington University In St Louis School Of Medicine
  • The University Of Texas School Of Medicine At San Antonio
  • Government Medical College Chandigarh
  • Kansas City University Of Medicine And Biosciences
  • Drexel University College Of Medicine
  • Nearby Group Practices

    We don't have any physicians that practice at Hope Hospice. Here are some Group Practices that specialize in Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Family Medicine, Geriatric Medicine, Internal Medicine, Vascular Surgery, General Practice, Emergency Medicine, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics and Critical Care Medicine near Hope Hospice Fort Myers, FL.

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

The Vitals website is provided for your informational use only. Nothing contained or offered by, on or through Vitals should be construed as medical advice or relied upon for medical diagnosis or treatment. Vitals does not recommend or endorse any particular healthcare provider whose information or ratings appear on this website. We encourage you to read our full Terms of Service.