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Quick Facts

  • Awards

    6 Awards

  • Compassionate Doctor Recognition
  • Patients' Choice Award
  • On-Time Doctor Award
  • Top 10 Doctor - City
  • Patient-Centered Medical Home
  • Physician Office Systems Recognition Program
  • Accepted Insurance

  • Humana
  • Aetna
  • Cigna
  • HAP
  • BCBS Michigan

Doctors in Sparrow Family Medical Services

View all physicians that belong to Sparrow Family Medical Services.

Ratings & Comments

455 ratings with 91 comments

The Overall Average Patient Rating of Sparrow Family Medical Services when asked is excellent. Sparrow Family Medical Services has been reviewed by 455 patients. The rating is 4.1 out of 5 stars.

The average wait time to see a doctor at Sparrow Family Medical Services as provided by patient reviews is 17 minutes. By comparison, the national average for a pre-vist wait time is 21 minutes.

Specialties

23 specialties

  • Internal Medicine

    An internist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of conditions that affect the adult population—both acute and chronic.
    These doctors are often who adults see as their primary physicians because they treat a broad range of illnesses that do not require surgical or specialist interventions. They also work to help a patient maintain optimal health in order to prevent the onset of disease.
    In addition to treating the common cold and flu, internists also treat chronic diseases like diabetes and heart disease.

  • Family Medicine

    A family practitioner is a doctor who specializes in caring for people of all ages, at all stages of life. Rather than focusing on the treatment of one disease or patient population, family practitioners are often the doctors that people see for their everyday ailments, like cold and flu or respiratory infections, and health screenings. When necessary, family practitioners will provide referrals for conditions that require the expertise of another specialist.
    The doctors may also provide physicals, inoculations, prenatal care, treat chronic diseases, like diabetes and asthma, and provide advice on disease prevention.

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

    An obstetrician & gynecologist, or OB/GYN, is a physician who cares for women throughout their pregnancies, straight through to the delivery of their baby (obstetrician). They also specialize in annual care, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the female reproductive system (gynecologist). Many physicians specialize in both of these fields in order to provide complete overall health services to women at every stage of life.

  • Pediatrics

    A pediatrician is a doctor who specializes in the regular care of children, as well as the diagnosis and treatment of illness in children. Young patients are often more complicated to treat because they are still growing and developing.
    While pediatricians may sub-specialize in specific therapy areas like oncology, surgery, ophthalmology, and anesthesiology, in general, pediatricians provide services like vaccinations, health exams, and treatment of common ailments and injuries. In addition, pediatricians are trained to handle the complex emotional and behavioral issues faced by children, especially during puberty.
    Pediatricians normally see their patients from birth until the age of 18, although some may agree to treat patients into their early 20s, if requested.

  • Hematology and Oncology

    An Oncologist is a physician who focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of different cancers. This physician has extensive knowledge of the different signs and symptoms of cancer, as well as the various methods of treatment.
    Oncologists diagnose cancer through methods such as biopsy, endoscopy, X-ray, blood tests, ultrasound, and different forms of nuclear medicine. They treat cancer through surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, hormone therapy, or antibody treatments.
    If it is determined that a cancer cannot successfully be treated, oncologists then focus on providing palliative care, the use of pain medication to make a dying person more comfortable.

  • Vascular Surgery

    Vascular surgeons treat and manage disorders in your veins, arteries and your lymphatic system to ensure blood circulation in your heart and in brain is the best it can be. They're well-versed on how your vascular system works with the rest of your body and they can treat conditions that may cause blockages or buildup.
    They can perform many of the same diagnostic testing as interventional radiologists can, such as angiography and MRIs. In addition to diagnosis, they provide critical care and treatment for aneurysms, artery blockages and trauma injuries that involve your veins. They can also help patients manage diabetes, blood pressure and cholesterol as well as treat artery disease. Treatment for more serious cases might include bypass surgery or surgery to remove plaque.

  • Hospitalist

    Hospitalists are physicians who specialize in the care of patients in the hospital. The majority of hospitalists are board-certified internists and have completed the same training as other internal medicine doctors including medical school, residency and board certification examination.
    Hospitalist activities include patient care, teaching, research, and leadership related to hospital care. They have more expertise in caring for complicated hospitalized patients on a daily basis since, unlike other specialists or primary care doctors, they spend most of their day in the hospital.
    They often coordinate the care of their patients and act as the central point of communication among the different doctors and nurses involved in the patient's care. They are also the main physician for family members to contact for updates on a loved one.

  • Cardiovascular Disease
  • Thoracic Surgery

    If you need surgery to treat a complication in your chest, which includes your lungs, esophagus, diaphragm and heart, your doctor will refer you to a thoracic surgeon. They’re trained to offer surgical treatment for tumors and abnormalities in these areas as well as respiratory and heart conditions like lung cancer, heart disease and diseases in the diaphragm.
    Thoracic surgeons are similar to heart surgeons, except they have additional training in the entire cardiorespiratory system and in how your blood vessels work with your lungs and airways. They’re also trained on catheters used in the chest, as well as cardiac and respiratory support systems that might be part of your treatment plan.

  • Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation

    A physiatrist is a doctor who specializes in the rehabilitation and physiological treatment of patients with an illness or injury that affects movement.
    These specialists have extensive knowledge of the nerves, muscles, bone, and brain. Physiatrists are also experts in pain medication.
    Some common conditions that physiatrists treat are rheumatoid arthritis, neurological and spinal disorders and injuries, chronic pain disorders, like fibromyalgia, and musculoskeletal issues, like broken bones and torn muscles.
    These physicians also often coordinate a team of other specialists in order to maximize the patient's recovery, such as occupational therapists, speech therapists, neurologists, orthopedists, and counselors.

  • Critical Care Medicine

    Also sometimes referred to as intensivists, critical care specialists are physicians with specialized training in the diagnosis and management of life-threatening conditions. Some of these conditions affect vital organs like the heart and lungs, those that make breathing difficult or impossible, and those that affect entire organ systems, like the renal system.
    Critical care specialists are typically found in a hospital's intensive care unit where they monitor patients with life-threatening conditions and make determinations as to the best course of treatment.

  • Geriatric Medicine

    A geriatric specialist is a physician who treats the elderly population and the conditions that most commonly affect them. These doctors have special training in the effects of aging on the body and mind of a patient.
    Geriatric specialists treat common ailments faced by senior citizens, such as frailty, incontinence, memory problems, arthritis, senility, decreased functioning and more.
    In addition, geriatric specialists keep abreast of the different medications that an elderly person is prescribed to treat their more complex health issues in order to decrease adverse side effects and avoid dangerous drug interactions.

  • Maternal and Fetal Medicine
  • Neurology

    A neurologist is a physician who diagnoses and treats disorders of the nervous system which is comprised of the brain, spinal cord and nerves. These doctors do not perform surgery, but refer patients to neurological surgeons when they determine that surgical intervention is necessary.
    Some of the conditions that neurologists diagnose and treat are epilepsy, aneurysms, hydrocephalus, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke, spinal disc herniation, and spinal disease.
    In addition to using diagnostic tests like MRI, CT scans, EEG and EMG, neurologists also employ neurological testing to gauge muscle strength and movement, balance, reflexes, sensation, memory, speech, and other cognitive abilities.

  • Psychiatry

    A psychiatrist is a doctor with specific training in the diagnosis and treatment of mental illness.
    He or she can not only provide the counseling necessary to both diagnose and treat a patient, but can also prescribe medication when needed. In some cases, a psychiatrist will only provide the medication and the counseling will be provided by another healthcare specialist, like a certified counselor or psychologist.
    Like other doctors, psychiatrists employ diagnostic tools like CT scans and MRI in order to observe the structure and function of a patient's brain.
    Once a diagnosis is made, these specialists may use behavior or cognitive therapy in order to address the patient's condition, or a multitude of other types of therapy, in conjunction with or in place of medication.

  • Pediatric Gastroenterology

    Pediatric gastroenterologists can treat a variety of diseases and conditions in infants and children related to their liver, pancreas or intestines. If your child has severe or recurrent abdominal pain, constipation or diarrhea, a pediatric gastroenterologist can help you get to the bottom of it. They can also help identify the many possible causes of failure to thrive in infants.
    Other common conditions they treat include Crohn's Disease, inflammatory bowel disease, liver disease, short gut syndrome and hepatitis C, as well as nutritional disorders like celiac disease and lactose intolerance. In order to diagnose and treat your child’s condition, gastroenterologists can perform colonoscopies and other diagnostic testing before deciding on the best treatment plan.

  • Occupational Medicine

    You might work with an occupational therapist when you’re injured or if you have a disability. They rehabilitate and assist patients with every day activities, such as eating, getting dressed, working and attending social events. This includes self-care, leisure and work-related activities that lead to increased independence and development. Their goal is to empower people to still live the life they want despite any physical, developmental, social and/or emotional issues they might face.

  • Gynecology
  • Nephrology

    A nephrologist is a physician who is specially trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the kidneys or renal system.
    A nephrologist will determine through urine analysis, blood test, X-ray, sonogram, or kidney biopsy how well the kidneys are functioning and will then prescribe a special diet and exercise program, medication or dialysis - a process by which a machine filters the blood when the kidney is no longer capable of doing so.

  • Interventional Cardiology

    An interventional cardiologist has the same training as a cardiologist and they're well-versed in all types of heart disease and how to diagnose heart problems. The difference is that interventional cardiologists have additional expertise and training on specific interventional treatments for heart disease, such as angioplasties and stents. These methods use catheterization, which reduces recovery time as well as scarring after surgery.

  • Pediatric Endocrinology

    Endocrinologists treat disorders related to our glands and the hormones they produce. Because hormones play a key role in the growth and development of children, these conditions often pose different threats to children than they do adults. That’s where a pediatric endocrinologist comes in.
    They can diagnose and treat hormonal disorders such as abnormal thyroid function, growth complications and early or delayed puberty. Ambiguous genitals as well as ovarian and testicular dysfunction are also part of their expertise. Childhood obesity, diabetes and problems with low blood sugar also tie back to hormone function and may require consulting with a pediatric endocrinologist.

  • Clinical Cardiac Electrophysiology

    While cardiologists diagnose and treat all types of heart disease, electrophysiologists have extended education in rhythmic disorders, also known as cardiac arrhythmia or an irregular heartbeat. An electrophysiologist typically works closely with a cardiologist and together they can treat arrhythmia, help you prevent blood clots, or restore and control a normal heart rate.
    They can also provide information on medications and devices — such as a pacemaker or an implantable defibrillator — used to control an abnormal heart rate. When it come to treating arrhythmias, there are both invasive and non-invasive treatment options and an electrophysiologist can help you decide which is right for you.

  • Pain Management

    A pain management specialist is a physician with advanced knowledge and training in diagnosing and treating pain. These doctors do not come from one particular discipline, but rather use their respective backgrounds to contribute a varied approach to the field of pain management.
    These specialists use their different skills and training in pain management to treat pain stemming from different causes - whether it's neuropathic pain or headache, or the result of injury, a surgical procedure, cancer or another illness.
    Pain management specialists are primarily trained as anesthesiologists, physiatrists, interventional radiologists, neurologists, osteopaths, or primary care physicians.

  • Education

    Affiliated doctors have gone to the following schools

  • Michigan State University College Of Human Medicine
  • University Of Michigan Medical School
  • Wayne State University School Of Medicine
  • Des Moines University
  • Osmania Medical College
  • Harvard Medical School
  • Medical College Of Georgia School Of Medicine
  • University Of Missouri Kansas City School Of Medicine
  • University Of North Dakota School Of Medicine And Health Sciences
  • University Of California San Diego School Of Medicine
  • Loyola University Chicago Stritch School Of Medicine
  • National Taiwan University
  • University Of South Florida College Of Medicine
  • University Of Puerto Rico School Of Medicine
  • Kirksville College Of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Karnataka Institute Of Medical Sciences
  • King Edward Medical University
  • University Of Chicago Division Of The Biological Sciences The Pritzker School Of Medicine
  • Sackler School Of Medicine
  • Seth Gs Medical College
  • University Of Damascus
  • University Of Connecticut School Of Medicine
  • Medical College Of Wisconsin
  • University Of Texas Medical Branch School Of Medicine
  • Dow Medical College
  • West Virginia University School Of Medicine
  • Saint Louis University School Of Medicine
  • Nearby Group Practices

    Sparrow Family Medical Services is similar to the following 3 Group Pracices near Lansing, MI.

  • Mid Michigan Health Services

    Group Practice

    Lansing, MI

  • MSU Center for Bleeding and Clotting

    Group Practice

    Lansing, MI

  • MSU Physical Medicine and Rehab Clinic

    Group Practice

    Lansing, MI

Information About Group Practices

What is a Group Practice?

According to The Medical Group Management Association, a group practice is any relationship between three or more physicians who share facilities, expenses, profits and other resources like support staff and equipment. Group practices tend to fall into two categories: those that organize around a particular medical specialty and those that encompass several specialties like East Boston Neighborhood Health that specializes in internal medicine

Why Group Practice?

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.

Benefits of Group Practice

As medicine became more complex in the twentieth century, the need for group practices made more sense. Physicians found it impossible to know everything about the emerging drugs and technologies on the medical landscape. In addition, the cost of providing a full range of diagnostic services, such as tests and X-rays, in one location became prohibitive to the individual practitioner. Hence, doctors from various disciplines began to team together in order to provide more comprehensive care to their community of patients.